35

I have a simple Visual Studio solution, running ASP.NET Core v2 and building a React app.

Now, I want to install a simple component using the NPM. In this particular example, it could be:

npm install --save react-bootstrap-typeahead

I want this package to work just in my solution and nowhere else.

My result:

When I run this, I get the following nice error which obviously makes some sense. If NPM believes it can find my project file at 'C:\Users\LarsHoldgaard\package.json', it's out of luck. The correct path would be C:\Users\LarsHoldgaard\Documents\Github\Likvido.CreditRisk\Likvido.CreditRisk\Likvido.CreditRisk .

npm : npm WARN saveError ENOENT: no such file or directory, open 'C:\Users\LarsHoldgaard\package.json'
At line:1 char:1
+ npm install --save react-bootstrap-typeahead
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (npm WARN saveEr...d\package.json':String) [], RemoteException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : NativeCommandError

npm

WARN

enoent
 ENOENT: no such file or directory, open 'C:\Users\LarsHoldgaard\package.json'

npm

WARN
 grunt-sass@2.0.0 requires a peer of grunt@>=0.4.0 but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 react-rating@1.0.6 requires a peer of react@>=0.13.0 but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 react-bootstrap-typeahead@2.5.1 requires a peer of react@^0.14.0 || ^15.2.0 || ^16.0.0 but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 react-bootstrap-typeahead@2.5.1 requires a peer of react-dom@^0.14.0 || ^15.2.0 || ^16.0.0 but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 prop-types-extra@1.0.1 requires a peer of react@>=0.14.0 but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 react-overlays@0.8.3 requires a peer of react@^0.14.9 || >=15.3.0 but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 react-overlays@0.8.3 requires a peer of react-dom@^0.14.9 || >=15.3.0 but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 react-onclickoutside@6.7.1 requires a peer of react@^15.5.x || ^16.x but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 react-onclickoutside@6.7.1 requires a peer of react-dom@^15.5.x || ^16.x but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 react-transition-group@2.2.1 requires a peer of react@>=15.0.0 but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 react-transition-group@2.2.1 requires a peer of react-dom@>=15.0.0 but none is installed. You must install peer dependencies yourself.

npm

WARN
 LarsHoldgaard No description

npm

WARN
 LarsHoldgaard No repository field.

npm

WARN
 LarsHoldgaard No README data

npm

WARN
 LarsHoldgaard No license field.

My thinking:

Being a console noob, I would guess I just needed to change my current folder. But if I run dir, I am in the right folder, and I can see my package.json along with other files.

What is the right way to install components?

5
  • It's trying to use the default package location. Review how npm config works, and look here to find the package you've already installed. (I'd offer a better answer but I've forgotten the specifics, I gave up on the tangled mess that is the JS package world after seeing the vast sprawling dependencies that make up practically every package out there. But I do remember npm config took a fair bit of study before I had everything working right.)
    – McGuireV10
    Mar 10, 2018 at 11:09
  • Oops, thought you were trying to find it after install. Well, in any case, configuring npm should clarify everything for you. It does have the concept of global and local packages that you'll want to consider.
    – McGuireV10
    Mar 10, 2018 at 11:10
  • Can you run cd && npm root and paste the output here? Mar 13, 2018 at 12:35
  • @AlexeyAndrushkevich Output: PM> npm root C:\Users\LarsHoldgaard\node_modules Mar 13, 2018 at 14:31
  • 1
    I think the issue is that you are trying to run npm from the Package Manager Console. Open regular command line application by pressing Win-R and type in cmd command. Then in terminal window navigate to your project and then run npm install command as you stated above. Mar 13, 2018 at 15:23

6 Answers 6

36
+50

To avoid navigating manually to the correct directory use the "Open Command Line" extension from Mads Kristensen. It is available for free in the Marketplace. You find it here.

Once installed you can open a command prompt conviently directly from within Visual Studio.

enter image description here

Tipp: Use the Keyboard Shortcut ALT+Space instead of the context menu to open the command prompt.

You can then run your npm command:

npm install react-bootstrap-typeahead

As a side note: As of npm 5.0.0, installed modules are added as a dependency by default, so the --save option is no longer required.

Update 2019:

Developer Command Prompt and Developer Power Shell are now integrated into Visual Studio 2019 ( 16.2 Preview 2 ) - no need for an extension anymore.

You find them under Tools/Command Line

By default no shortcut is assigned - so you have to do this yourself.

enter image description here

1
  • Not terribly important or related, really, but have you ever used Alt+Space for what it actually does, in Windows? It's the only thing that'll make for an easy recovery when the window gets stuck in a really odd position & you can't grab a corner. Even better, the window position sometimes persists after closing and reopening the app. So ... Alt+Space maybe should be left to being a Windows shortcut? Dec 16, 2020 at 22:48
22

I think the easiest way is to simple use the UI, Visual Studio provides.

Create in the root of your project a package.json (Todo so, right click your project, add item and search for NPM. You will find a npm Configuration File):

{
  "name": "SomeName",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "private": true,
  "devDependencies": {
    "react-bootstrap-typeahead": "*"
  }
}

Note that * is for the latest version. This is not recommended. Better to specify the version you want. You will notice, that you have support of intellisence for versions and package names.

Everytime you make changes to the json file, simple press CTRL + S. Visual Studio automaticly calls NPM and restores the packages.

For how to use the command line, other have already answerd. But as being a command line noob myself, I prefer this way.

1
  • Intellisense does not work for me. Any ideas how to enable it?
    – Tigerware
    May 16, 2019 at 12:02
8

You can use the Package Manager Console to run npm command.

To open the Package Manager Console, go to Tools > Nuget Package Manager and select Package Manager Console and then enter your npm command.

enter image description here

enter image description here


Update:

The latest visual studio 16.8.3 onwards, you will find the terminal built into visual studio.

You can find it by right-clicking at your solution or a shortcut Ctrl + `: enter image description here

enter image description here

6
  • 1
    I get an error "The term 'npm' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program..."
    – Jeremy
    Jul 25, 2019 at 16:16
  • 4
    @Jeremy that problem showed because you haven't install NPM. Click here to install nodejs+npm and you will see the command working. Sep 4, 2019 at 14:23
  • 2
    NPM already comes installed at "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2019\Professional\MSBuild\Microsoft\VisualStudio\NodeJs". Surely you're not saying that we need to install 2 separate NodeJS copies?
    – AlexPi
    Dec 20, 2019 at 1:00
  • Not every installation will have nodejs installed by default. It depends on the selection you choose during the installation. If you have nodejs installed in your visual studio folder and it's still not working, you just have to set the environment path pointing to the nodejs folder. Dec 21, 2019 at 2:16
  • 1
    @Yew Hong Tat - Is it safe ? :-) Seriously. I see 7 incarnations of node.exe liberally spread :-) under \Program Files*. VS 17 happily installed NodeJs workload, never complaining that nodejs is missing. Even created a new project and then complained :-)) Standalone install brought python v2.7.17 - not looking at all that 3.6 is on the box. and duplicated 3 cmd links under VS (native and cross tools), "Node.js Tools" are non-existent under Tools and your advice is "just add to the path" ? :-) Compare to how smooth Python integration is (Tools submenu, environments (kind of sandbox) ...).
    – ZXX
    Jan 31, 2020 at 10:30
6
  • In Window's Explorer, navigate to where the package.json file is located in your project.
  • Create a folder named node_modules in the same directory as your package.json file
  • While holding the left [Shift] key, right click in the folder containing the project.json file.
  • From the context menu select 'Open command window here'.
  • Input your npm command npm install --save react-bootstrap-typeahead
1
  • Any feedback for me as to why this answer was downvoted? May 19, 2020 at 13:55
3

I use a different approach, configuring npm per SOLUTION, instead of per PROJECT.
Please refer to my BLOG:

A better way to use Visual Studio with npm ( and Gulp )

It is working fine and you may use Command Line ou Package Manager Console do install/update/uninstall npm packages. I am currently using it with Visual Studio 2019 and ASP.NET Core MVC.

1

Adding my 2 cents from 2021.

Visual Studio comes with built-in npm support, no CLI required. VS can automatically install/restore packages in the background - on project open and/or after making changes to packages.json file. You can enable this here:

enter image description here

For example, here's an article about configuring automatic minification and compilation for js/css files via npm tool, using just naked Visual Studio (DISCLAIMER: I wrote that blog post myself last year)

1
  • This was easy. I am new to this node and npm stuff everything was going over my head... This saved my day. Jul 5 at 7:11

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