73

I have JS array with strings, for example:

var strArray = [ "q", "w", "w", "e", "i", "u", "r"];

I need to compare for duplicate strings inside array, and if duplicate string exists, there should be alert box pointing to that string.

I was trying to compare it with for loop, but I don't know how to write code so that array checks its own strings for duplicates, without already pre-determined string to compare.

3
  • Consecutive duplicates, or duplicates of any sort? If you threw another 'q' in there at the end, should that count as a duplicate or not?
    – kshetline
    Mar 11 '18 at 0:19
  • Duplicates of any sort. It can be in in the middle of the array, or at the end of the array, or any other combination.
    – Bengall
    Mar 11 '18 at 0:24
  • In my tests, the fastest method is this one.
    – ashleedawg
    Aug 29 '20 at 21:09

12 Answers 12

123

The findDuplicates function (below) compares index of all items in array with index of first occurrence of same item. If indexes are not same returns it as duplicate.

let strArray = [ "q", "w", "w", "w", "e", "i", "u", "r"];
let findDuplicates = arr => arr.filter((item, index) => arr.indexOf(item) != index)

console.log(findDuplicates(strArray)) // All duplicates
console.log([...new Set(findDuplicates(strArray))]) // Unique duplicates

1
  • 14
    This doesn't return a unique array, duplicates will be included more than once if they're duplicated more than once in the array. xxxyyyxxx for example.
    – Zee
    Jun 7 '19 at 4:35
91

Using ES6 features

  • Because each value in the Set has to be unique, the value equality will be checked.

function checkIfDuplicateExists(arr) {
    return new Set(arr).size !== arr.length
}
  
var arr = ["a", "a", "b", "c"];
var arr1 = ["a", "b", "c"];

console.log(checkIfDuplicateExists(arr)); // true
console.log(checkIfDuplicateExists(arr1)); // false

15
var strArray = [ "q", "w", "w", "e", "i", "u", "r", "q"];
var alreadySeen = [];

strArray.forEach(function(str) {
  if (alreadySeen[str])
    alert(str);
  else
    alreadySeen[str] = true;
});

I added another duplicate in there from your original just to show it would find a non-consecutive duplicate.

Updated version with arrow function:

const strArray = [ "q", "w", "w", "e", "i", "u", "r", "q"];
const alreadySeen = [];

strArray.forEach(str => alreadySeen[str] ? alert(str) : alreadySeen[str] = true);
5
  • This solution works great, too! Thanks. Shame I can't accept (green checkmark) your answer also.
    – Bengall
    Mar 11 '18 at 0:58
  • Nice one. This particular logic easily allows for "Any" behavior (that is, I can short-circuit the loop when I find that there is any duplicate).
    – wildbagel
    Aug 28 '20 at 16:19
  • Can I clarify something please? Does the above expression alreadySeen[str] = true just add that str item to the alreadySeen array? Is it the same as alreadySeen.push(str)?
    – Ben Clarke
    Oct 25 at 8:04
  • @BenClarke, no, because a push word add str as an element of the array, whereas alreadySeen[str] = true adds str as an index of the array, using the array as a hash table. A Set object could be used here instead, perhaps with greater clarity.
    – kshetline
    Oct 25 at 8:46
  • @kshetline Ok thank you for clarifying. That's a bit too advanced for me though :) Is that method called anything in particular? I'd like to learn more about it
    – Ben Clarke
    Oct 25 at 14:13
9

You could take a Set and filter to the values that have already been seen.

var array = ["q", "w", "w", "e", "i", "u", "r"],
    seen = array.filter((s => v => s.has(v) || !s.add(v))(new Set));

console.log(seen);

0
6

Using some function on arrays: If any item in the array has an index number from the beginning is not equals to index number from the end, then this item exists in the array more than once.

// vanilla js
function hasDuplicates(arr) {
    return arr.some( function(item) {
        return arr.indexOf(item) !== arr.lastIndexOf(item);
    });
}
1
  • Hi, your function is what I need (return only a boolean) but I don't know ES6, can you write it in "simple" javascript please ?
    – Eve
    Jul 16 '19 at 14:11
1
   var elems = ['f', 'a','b','f', 'c','d','e','f','c'];

    elems.sort();

    elems.forEach(function (value, index, arr){

        let first_index = arr.indexOf(value);
        let last_index = arr.lastIndexOf(value);

         if(first_index !== last_index){

         console.log('Duplicate item in array ' + value);

         }else{

         console.log('unique items in array ' + value);

         }

    });
1

function hasDuplicates(arr) {
    var counts = [];

    for (var i = 0; i <= arr.length; i++) {
        if (counts[arr[i]] === undefined) {
            counts[arr[i]] = 1;
        } else {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

// [...]

var arr = [1, 1, 2, 3, 4];

if (hasDuplicates(arr)) {
  alert('Error: you have duplicates values !')
}

Simple Javascript (if you don't know ES6)

function hasDuplicates(arr) {
    var counts = [];

    for (var i = 0; i <= arr.length; i++) {
        if (counts[arr[i]] === undefined) {
            counts[arr[i]] = 1;
        } else {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

// [...]

var arr = [1, 1, 2, 3, 4];

if (hasDuplicates(arr)) {
  alert('Error: you have duplicates values !')
}
0

Use object keys for good performance when you work with a big array (in that case, loop for each element and loop again to check duplicate will be very slowly).

var strArray = ["q", "w", "w", "e", "i", "u", "r"];

var counting = {};
strArray.forEach(function (str) {
    counting[str] = (counting[str] || 0) + 1;
});

if (Object.keys(counting).length !== strArray.length) {
    console.log("Has duplicates");

    var str;
    for (str in counting) {
        if (counting.hasOwnProperty(str)) {
            if (counting[str] > 1) {
                console.log(str + " appears " + counting[str] + " times");
            }
        }
    }
}
0

This is the simplest solution I guess :

function diffArray(arr1, arr2) {
  return arr1
    .concat(arr2)
    .filter(item => !arr1.includes(item) || !arr2.includes(item));
}
0
 const isDuplicate = (str) =>{
   return new Set(str.split("")).size === str.length;
}
2
  • 1
    Can you explain why this works? Since this question is rather old, it's a good idea to clearly articulate why it is useful. Oct 8 at 21:37
  • The above method is a predicate method which means is only returning boolean value. Since set take only unique value, I split the string to array of character then I parse the array of character to the set constructor for removing any duplicate character. Which mean if duplicate exist in the character array, the set will contain on the unique ones, after that I compare the length of the original string against the set size. If the length are the same it means no duplicate else it means there is. Oct 10 at 7:00
0

You have to create an empty array then check each element of the given array if the new array already has the element it will alert you. Something like this.

  var strArray = [ "q", "w", "w", "e", "i", "u", "r"];
  let newArray =[];
  function check(arr){
  for(let elements of arr){
  if(newArray.includes(elements)){
  alert(elements)
  }
 else{
 newArray.push(elements);
 }
 }
 return newArray.sort();
  }
check(strArray);
-1

You could use reduce:

const arr = ["q", "w", "w", "e", "i", "u", "r"]
arr.reduce((acc, cur) => { 
  if(acc[cur]) {
    acc.duplicates.push(cur)
  } else {
    acc[cur] = true //anything could go here
  }
}, { duplicates: [] })

Result would look like this:

{ ...Non Duplicate Values, duplicates: ["w"] }

That way you can do whatever you want with the duplicate values!

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.