19

I have two arrays A = [0,1,2] and B = [2,1,0]. How to check if a number in A is present in B?

3
  • 6
    A.every( e => B.includes(e) ) – Pranav C Balan Mar 11 '18 at 9:10
  • 1
    Or A.some(e => B.includes(e)) if you meant "any number of A present in B". – Jeto Mar 11 '18 at 9:19
  • @PranavCBalan includes is not ES6, but ES7 – dman May 7 '19 at 17:11
65

NOTE: includes is not ES6, but ES2016 Mozilla docs. This will break if you transpile ES6 only.

You can use Array#every method(to iterate and check all element passes the callback function) with Array#includes method(to check number present in B).

A.every( e => B.includes(e) )

const A = [0, 1, 2],
  B = [2, 1, 0],
  C=[2, 1];

console.log(A.every(e => B.includes(e)));
console.log(A.every(e => C.includes(e)));
console.log(C.every(e => B.includes(e)));

To check a single element present in the second array do:

A[0].includes(e) 
//^---index

Or using Array#indexOf method, for older browser.

A[0].indexOf(e) > -1 

Or in case you want to check at least one element present in the second array then you need to use Array#some method(to iterate and check at least one element passes the callback function).

A.some(e => B.includes(e) )

const A = [0, 1, 2],
  B = [2, 1, 0],
  C=[2, 1],D=[4];

console.log(A.some(e => B.includes(e)));
console.log(A.some(e => C.includes(e)));
console.log(C.some(e => B.includes(e)));
console.log(C.some(e => D.includes(e)));

4
  • 1
    That's supposing he meant "all numbers in A are present in B", which I'm not sure he was. – Jeto Mar 11 '18 at 9:17
  • 1
    Be warned that this will not work for arrays containing arrays/objects. – Redwolf Programs Dec 7 '18 at 19:04
  • 1
    Also will be incorrect if A is a subset of B. E.g. A = [0], B = [0,1,2] – Vasil Dininski Apr 26 '19 at 15:35
  • @VasilDininski : agreed, plus this doesn't work if you've A = [1,2,3,3] , B = [1,2,3] , coz it's a normal comparison of variable exist or not !! – whoami - fakeFaceTrueSoul Jul 2 '19 at 19:37
4

Here's a self defined function I use to compare two arrays. Returns true if array elements are similar and false if different. Note: Does not return true if arrays are equal (array.len && array.val) if duplicate elements exist.

var first = [1,2,3];
var second = [1,2,3];
var third = [3,2,1];
var fourth = [1,3];
var fifth = [0,1,2,3,4];

console.log(compareArrays(first, second));
console.log(compareArrays(first, third));
console.log(compareArrays(first, fourth));
console.log(compareArrays(first, fifth));

function compareArrays(first, second){
    //write type error
    return first.every((e)=> second.includes(e)) && second.every((e)=> first.includes(e));
}

2
  • first and third are different - this solution doesn't account for order – dzh May 20 '20 at 6:28
  • Yes like i said Note: Does not return true if arrays are equal (array.len && array.val) if duplicate elements exist. you need to add a bit more code to of use a different alogorithm to detect exact equality. A combination of Array.every() with Array.findIndex() should do the trick. – Kiren James May 21 '20 at 14:37
2

If the intent is to actually compare the array, the following will also account for duplicates

const arrEq = (a, b) => {
  if (a.length !== b.length) {
    return false
  }
  const aSorted = a.sort()
  const bSorted = b.sort()


  return aSorted
    .map((val, i) => bSorted[i] === val)
    .every(isSame => isSame)
}

Hope this helps someone :D

1

If you just need to know whether A and B has same entries, simply

JSON.stringify(A.concat().sort()) === JSON.stringify(B.concat().sort())

Note: If there are null and undefined in each array, it will be true. Because JSON#stringify converts undefined to null.

JSON.stringify([null].concat().sort()) === JSON.stringify([undefined].concat().sort()) 
// true

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