5

I'm new to Python so please be gentle.

I seriously don't know what is wrong with my code.

Here it is:

import numpy as np

def epsilon(t):
    epsilon = (1 - np.exp(-pow(t, 4)))
    return epsilon

def r(t):
    r = pow( (epsilon(t) - 16) / 4, 1/4)
    return r

print(r(0))

Since epsilon(0) = 0, I'd expect (analytically) to get r = (-16/4)^(1/4) = (-1)^(1/4)*sqrt(2) = exp(i pi /4)*sqrt(2) = 1 + 1 i

But instead I get:

RuntimeWarning: invalid value encountered in double_scalars
  r = pow((4 * epsilon(t) - 16) / 4, 1/4)
nan

I've tried to find the error. If I print epsilon(0) I get 0 as expected, and If i set epsilon(0) manually like:

def r(t):
    r = pow( 0 - 16) / 4, 1/4)
    return r
print(r(0))

I get 1 + 1 j. And If I remove the to the power of 1/4, it works and I get -4

import numpy as np

def epsilon(t):
    epsilon = (1 - np.exp(-pow(t, 4)))
    return epsilon

def r(t):
    r = (epsilon(t) - 16) / 4
    return r

print(r(0))

So why do

import numpy as np

def epsilon(t):
    epsilon = (1 - np.exp(-pow(t, 4)))
    return epsilon

def r(t):
    r = pow( (epsilon(t) - 16) / 4, 1/4)
    return r

print(r(0))

I get this error?

1

I noticed that the value returned by epsilon() is of type <class 'numpy.float64'>. The problem occurs when we include this value in Python's built in pow() function. For example, try pow(np.float64(-4.0), 1/4); it breaks too. Perhaps it's due to this:

With mixed operand types, the coercion rules for binary arithmetic operators apply. Built-in Functions: pow()

I managed to fix the issue by casting the result of epsilon() to float.

r = pow( float((epsilon(t) - 16) / 4), 1/4).

  • What are the coercion rules – SmartManoj Mar 11 '18 at 12:20
3

Problem is probably caused by the numpy float thing. (as aswered by Schomes). Fix by convert to 'normal' float.

import numpy as np

def epsilon(t):
    epsilon = (1 - np.exp(-pow(t, 4)))
    return epsilon

def r(t):
    epsi_boy = epsilon(t)
    print(type(epsi_boy)) # numpy float
    epsi_boy = float(epsi_boy) # Convert to non numpy float
    r = pow( (epsi_boy - 16) / 4,  1/4)
    return r

print(r(0))
1

The reason is numpy float64 are like c float, and overload all operations (including) power to work as such. This is the type returned by exp and subsequently in all operations. Note you're trying to compute:

(-4)**(1/4)

which is an imaginary number. Python can handle that, and output the result, but numpy float64s are "real", so the above is an invalid expression. For this reason all the answers here suggesting to convert to float work:

>>> (-4)**(1/4)
(1.0000000000000002+1j)
>>> np.float64(-4)**(1/4)
__main__:1: RuntimeWarning: invalid value encountered in double_scalars
nan
0
from math import exp
def epsilon(t):
    epsilon = (1 - exp(-pow(t, 4)))
    return epsilon


def r(t):
    print(2)
    t=epsilon(t)
    r = pow( ( t- 16) / 4, 1/4)
    return r

print(r(0))

Or

from numpy import exp
def epsilon(t):
    epsilon = (1 - exp(-pow(t, 4)))
    return epsilon


def r(t):
    print(2)
    t=epsilon(t)
    r = pow( float( t- 16) / 4, 1/4)
    return r

print(r(0))

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