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How to compare the strings on characters, check that the strings consist of the same symbols using T-SQL?

For example:

  • 'aaabbcd' vs 'ddbca' (TRUE): both strings consist of the same symbols
  • 'abcddd' vs 'cda' (FALSE): both strings do not consist of the same symbols
2

An inline method.

This uses a numbers table

CREATE TABLE dbo.Numbers (number INT PRIMARY KEY);

INSERT INTO dbo.Numbers
SELECT TOP 8000 ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY @@SPID)
FROM sys.all_columns c1, 
     sys.all_columns c2

A version without but with lesser performance is in the edit history if you'd prefer trading off performance against not having to use one.

WITH T(S1, S2) 
     AS (SELECT 'aaabbcd', 
                'ddbca' 
         UNION ALL 
         SELECT 'abcddd', 
                'cda')
SELECT * 
FROM   T 
       CROSS APPLY (SELECT CASE WHEN Min(Cnt) = 2 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS Flag 
                    FROM   (SELECT Count(*) AS Cnt 
                            FROM   (SELECT 1                           AS s, 
                                           Substring(S1, N1.number, 1) AS c 
                                    FROM   dbo.Numbers N1 
                                    WHERE  N1.number <= Len(S1) 
                                    UNION 
                                    SELECT 2                           AS s, 
                                           Substring(S2, N2.number, 1) AS c 
                                    FROM   dbo.Numbers N2 
                                    WHERE  N2.number <= Len(S2)) D1 
                            GROUP  BY c) D2 
                    ) Ca 
  • Instead of OVER ( ORDER BY @@spid) go with OVER ( ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) it will prevent an unnecessary sort. – Alan Burstein Mar 12 '18 at 1:40
  • @AlanBurstein Sql server realises that @@SPID is a constant. There is no sort for this dbfiddle.uk/… – Martin Smith Mar 12 '18 at 2:00
  • it's an odd thing but, when you are using sys.all_columns for your "dummy" data, the optimizer is, for some reason, kinder to ORDER BY (SELECT NULL) than it is to ORDER BY @@SPID. Compare the execution plan of both these: SELECT TOP 100 ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY @@SPID) number FROM sys.all_columns; SELECT TOP 100 ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) number FROM sys.all_columns; – Alan Burstein Mar 12 '18 at 20:05
  • 1
    @AlanBurstein - The join type between syscolpars and sysobjvalues? The plans look the same if an explicit option (merge join) hint is added so not sure if there is any particular reason why it didn't get to that or just a quirk in this case. Just looking at your tests at the moment - I'll add a version with a permanent numbers table into the mix as obviously the definition of Nums has some extraneous stuff that isn't going to help performance. – Martin Smith Mar 12 '18 at 20:19
3

If performance is important then I would suggest a purely set-based solution using Ngrams8k.

This will give you the correct answer:

SELECT AllSame = COALESCE(MAX(0),1)
FROM dbo.ngrams8k(@string1, 1) ng1
FULL JOIN dbo.ngrams8k(@string2, 1) ng2 ON ng1.token = ng2.token
WHERE ng1.token IS NULL OR ng2.token IS NULL;

To use this logic against a table you could use CROSS APPLY like so:

-- Sample data
DECLARE @table TABLE (string1 varchar(100), string2 varchar(100));
INSERT @table VALUES ('aaabbcd','ddbca'),('abcddd','cda');

-- Solution using CROSS APPLY
SELECT * 
FROM @table t
CROSS APPLY
(
  SELECT AllSame = COALESCE(MAX(0),1)
  FROM dbo.ngrams8k(t.string1, 1) ng1
  FULL JOIN dbo.ngrams8k(t.string2, 1) ng2 ON ng1.token = ng2.token
  WHERE ng1.token IS NULL OR ng2.token IS NULL
) x;

Results:

string1   string2   AllSame
--------- --------- --------
aaabbcd   ddbca     1
abcddd    cda       0

Not only will this be the fastest solution presented thus far, notice that we're getting the job done with as little code possible.

UPDATE TO INCLUDE COMPARE PERFORMANCE TO MARTIN SMITH'S SOLUTION

-- sample data
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#sample') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #sample;
SELECT TOP (10000)
  string1 = replicate('a',abs(checksum(newid())%5))+replicate('b',abs(checksum(newid())%4))+
            replicate('c',abs(checksum(newid())%5))+replicate('d',abs(checksum(newid())%4))+
            replicate('e',abs(checksum(newid())%5))+replicate('f',abs(checksum(newid())%4)),
  string2 = replicate('a',abs(checksum(newid())%5))+replicate('b',abs(checksum(newid())%4))+
            replicate('c',abs(checksum(newid())%5))+replicate('d',abs(checksum(newid())%4))+
            replicate('e',abs(checksum(newid())%5))+replicate('f',abs(checksum(newid())%4))
INTO #sample
FROM sys.all_columns a, sys.all_columns b;

SET NOCOUNT ON;
SET STATISTICS TIME ON;
PRINT 'ajb serial'+char(10)+replicate('-',50);
SELECT flag 
FROM #sample t
CROSS APPLY
(
  SELECT Flag = COALESCE(MAX(0),1)
  FROM dbo.ngrams8k(t.string1, 1) ng1
  FULL JOIN dbo.ngrams8k(t.string2, 1) ng2 ON ng1.token = ng2.token
  WHERE ng1.token IS NULL OR ng2.token IS NULL
) x
OPTION (MAXDOP 1);

PRINT 'ajb parallel'+char(10)+replicate('-',50);
SELECT flag 
FROM #sample t
CROSS APPLY
(
  SELECT Flag = COALESCE(MAX(0),1)
  FROM dbo.ngrams8k(t.string1, 1) ng1
  FULL JOIN dbo.ngrams8k(t.string2, 1) ng2 ON ng1.token = ng2.token
  WHERE ng1.token IS NULL OR ng2.token IS NULL
) x
OPTION (querytraceon 8649);

PRINT 'M Smith - serial'+char(10)+replicate('-',50);
WITH Nums AS 
(
  SELECT TOP (100) ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) number
  FROM sys.all_columns 
)
SELECT flag
FROM #sample T
CROSS APPLY (SELECT CASE WHEN Min(Cnt) = 2 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS Flag 
             FROM   (SELECT Count(*) AS Cnt 
                     FROM   (SELECT 1                           AS s, 
                                    Substring(t.string1, N1.number, 1) AS c 
                             FROM   Nums N1 
                             WHERE  N1.number <= Len(t.string1) 
                             UNION 
                             SELECT 2                           AS s, 
                                    Substring(t.string2, N2.number, 1) AS c 
                             FROM   Nums N2 
                             WHERE  N2.number <= Len(t.string2)) D1 
                     GROUP  BY c) D2 
             ) Ca 
OPTION (MAXDOP 1);
SET STATISTICS TIME OFF;

Results:

ajb serial
--------------------------------------------------
 SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 656 ms,  **elapsed time = 660 ms**.

ajb parallel
--------------------------------------------------
 SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 1281 ms,  **elapsed time = 204 ms**.

M Smith serial
--------------------------------------------------
 SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 1390 ms,  **elapsed time = 1393 ms**.

Note that I did not test Martin's solution with a parallel plan because, as is, that query cannot run in parallel.

  • 1
    "fastest solution" claim needs some results of testing. Though if you do decide to do so use an indexed numbers table in mine too. – Martin Smith Mar 12 '18 at 2:17
  • @MartinSmith - I prepared a performance test and added it to my original post for your review. Cheers! – Alan Burstein Mar 12 '18 at 19:58
  • 1
    +1 for the stats and test rig - with an indexed numbers table these are the stats I got i.stack.imgur.com/aMKQC.png – Martin Smith Mar 12 '18 at 20:46
1

You can use this'%your-search-string%' to find your string contains any substring.

SELECT * FROM TableName
WHERE Name LIKE '%searchText%'

You can use the stored procedure for checking that characters of the string.

CREATE PROCEDURE IsStringMatching
(
@originalString NVARCHAR(32) ,
@stringToBeChecked NVARCHAR(32),
@IsMatching BIT OUTPUT
)
AS
BEGIN
     DECLARE @inputStringCount INT = LEN(@originalString);
     DECLARE @loopCount INT = 0, @temp INT; 
     DECLARE @char VARCHAR;
     SET @IsMatching = 1
     WHILE @loopCount < @inputStringCount
        BEGIN
            SET @char = SUBSTRING(@originalString,@loopCount+1,1);
             SET @temp =  CHARINDEX(@char, @stringToBeChecked,1);
             IF(@temp = 0)
                BEGIN
                    SET @IsMatching = 0;
                    BREAK;
                END             
            SET @loopCount = @loopCount + 1;
        END;    
END

You can validate like this:

DECLARE @IsMatching BIT;
SELECT EXECUTE IsStringMatchingQ 'aaabbcd', 'ABC';
SELECT @IsMatching
  • OP wants to know if the same set of characters are used in both strings, regardless of order. – jarlh Mar 11 '18 at 20:49
  • How could the TRUE condition in the example happens if we are checking if the characters are of same set. A bit confusing though. – Farshan Mar 11 '18 at 21:06
  • The letters a, b, c and d in both strings - TRUE. a, b c and d in one string, but only a, c, and d in other string - FALSE. – jarlh Mar 11 '18 at 21:12
  • Awesome job on this, this function does appear to validate if the 2nd string contains all the same characters as the first string. If the OP indicates that both strings need to have the exact same characters (irrespective of the count), then this won't work unfortunately. You can test by abcd and abcdXYZ, the result is @IsMatching=1. – Brien Foss Mar 11 '18 at 22:42

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