5

After much Googling, I cannot find a clear example how to avoid programming every catch to ascertain if a Promise rejection error is programmatic or operational. Compare this to the Node callback pattern of providing callback(error, params...), where operational errors are cleanly provided in the error parameter, and programmatic errors are processed through throw chains.

Please tell me I'm making a noob mistake and there's an easy answer for this I've missed.


EDIT Node v10.0.0 now solves this exact problem by adding error codes.

Thanks to RisingStack for delivering this to my inbox:

https://blog.risingstack.com/node-js-10-lts-feature-breakdown

...and officially but rather terse (as always):

https://nodejs.org/api/errors.html#errors_error_code


Consider a common example:

function logMeIn (email, password, login_token) {
    selectFromDbByEmailAndCheckPwAndReturnId (email, password)
    .then(id => { return updateUserIdLoginToken(id, login_token); })
    .catch(error => {
        // all rejects and throws end up here
        console.log(error);
    })
})

function selectFromDbByEmailAndCheckPwAndReturnId (email, password) {
   return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      db.sql.query( /* params */, (error, results) => {
          blarg = 1; // <-- reference error, programmatic
          // do your SELECT * FROM Users where email=? ... etc.
          if (error) {
               return reject(error); // <-- operational sql error
          :
          :
          if (resultsRowsFromQuery.length === 0) {
             // vvvvv operational error: user not found
             return reject(new Error("User not in database"));
          }
          :
          // hash password & salt, etc etc etc ...
          :
          return resolve(resultRowsFromQuery[0].id);
      });
   });
}
// no need to code out updateUserIdLoginToken...

In this example catch will catch the programmatic error and both operational errors, and I have to program catch to determine which. If I wanted to return to the user the fact that their email is not found, I can't just use the message, because I might accidentally return a reference error message. (Awkward!)

However, compare with the the sql.query pattern and it is very clear that the error is operational, because blarg=1 would bubble up to higher levels were it not in a promise.

I see very little documentation on what the reject value should be, and how to differentiate. I've considered using resolve(new Error()) so that my success fulfillment function determines if there was an operational error and .catch is saved for programmatic errors, but that's just silly.

There's a lot of bad info out there because it often references bluebird, Q, A+ and ES6 over the past 7 years... hard to find examples for ES6 Node/7/9 ... [I've even seen links that claim using .then(func A(), func B()).catch() will send the programmatic errors to B and not to catch(). LOL.]

Thoughts?

EDIT #1: Request for promise-free example:

function logMeIn (email, password, login_token) {
  try {
    selectFromDbByEmailAndCheckPwAndReturnId (email, password, (error, id) => {
      if (error) {
        console.log("Operational error:", error)
        return;
      }
      // no error, got id, do next step...
      updateUserIdLoginToken(id, login_token, error => { 
         // do next thing, like return res.render() or something...
      });
    });
  } catch (e) {
    console.error("Programmatic error:", e);
  }
})

function selectFromDbByEmailAndCheckPwAndReturnId (email, password, callback) {
  db.sql.query( /* params */, (error, results) => {
      blarg = 1; // <-- reference error, programmatic
      // do your SELECT * FROM Users where email=? ... etc.
      if (error) {
         return callback(error, null);
      }
      :
      :
      if (resultsRowsFromQuery.length === 0) {
         // vvvvv operational error: user not found
         return callback(new Error("User not in database"), null);
      }
      :
      // hash password & salt, etc etc etc ...
      :
      return callback(null, id);
  });
}
20
  • Didn't you ask this before ... about 7 minutes before this question? Why close that question only to ask the exact question again? (no, I didn't downvote either question, before you ask) Mar 11, 2018 at 22:56
  • @JaromandaX .. Yeah that was me, but I asked the question in a dickish way and figured that's why I got downvoted, so I cleaned it up and resubmitted.
    – user3909192
    Mar 11, 2018 at 23:00
  • 1
    @Alnitak 99.99% of code is not correctly written. You can't expect it to be, Java's checked errors are now rather considered harmful. The debate ran for decades. Also, the return resolve(..) thing is a kind of best practice to prevent accidentally continuing the current function. Mar 12, 2018 at 0:11
  • 1
    @TamasHegedus interesting point re: the return - I always have my resolve / reject calls in separate branches. As for the other point, it was more about mixing .catch() and catch. If you've got upstream code that might throw unexpectedly, it might be better to try / catch that at point of call rather than let unhandled exceptions bubble into a .catch() block.
    – Alnitak
    Mar 12, 2018 at 0:25
  • 1
    @TamasHegedus - return resolve() is not best practice unless the return is actually needed for proper flow control. There are lots of cases where the resolve() is at the end of a branch of flow and the function will end anyway. Just like there's no need to put a blank return in a regular function, there's no need to do return resolve() either if the return isn't needed. Do you go around putting empty and unnecessary return statements in regular functions and call that best practice?
    – jfriend00
    Mar 12, 2018 at 0:33

4 Answers 4

2

You expect too much from both node-style and promise based code. Neither kind of asynchronous functions differentiate between the concepts of operational and programmatic errors, you can literally throw/reject anything, that's why you did not find much documentation about it. Both patterns are primitives for asynchronous code flow, nothing more. The node-style version is a bit awkward because that allows for both synchronous and asynchronous errors to be propagated (you need both try-catch, and if(error) to handle all errors). Although they should use only the asynchronous version. Using both "error channels" in a single function is not a feature, it's just misbehaving code.

Neither node-style nor promise based asynchronous code should throw regular synchronous errors. So don't use these two different error propagation channels to differentiate between programmatic and operational errors.

So to answer the question, how do you differentiate between them? Just as you would do with regular synchronous code, you have to introduce your own abstraction:

  • either make every service function return some kind of Result type which would have a field for operational errors (See rust's error handling: https://doc.rust-lang.org/book/first-edition/error-handling.html)
  • or create an OperationalError class, use as many subclasses as you want, and make your top level code differentiate between OperationalError-s and any other kinds of errors. This is what I recommend.
  • or use what your framework provides, although I did not find any good examples for this
2
  • "you have to introduce your own abstraction". Thanks. I wanted to check first before doing that, making sure I wasn't missing something and about to re-invent the wheel, but it seems like there is no wheel, just tools.
    – user3909192
    Mar 12, 2018 at 2:25
  • Just came here to say that Node 10 solves my problem by adding error codes.
    – user3909192
    May 7, 2018 at 3:31
2

In callback based code, you have to handle with errors yourself and if required throw the error. The async call won't simply throw the error. Now if you want the promise way of implementation, of course the only way is to treat even error as if they are success and then handle it in the "then" chain... not in catch chain. That's the only way to be certain if there is any error. However as you would be aware, in promises, you can resolve only one data not a comma separated list of data. So, you should follow a standard just as traditional callbacks says, first param would be error and following would be responses if any.

As per your example :

function logMeIn (email, password, login_token) {
    selectFromDbByEmailAndCheckPwAndReturnId (email, password)
    .then(response => { 
      if(response.error) {
        // Operational error
      } else {
        // successful response
      }
    })
    .catch(error => {
        // programmatic errors;
        console.log(error);
    })
})

function selectFromDbByEmailAndCheckPwAndReturnId (email, password) {
   return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      db.sql.query( /* params */, (error, results) => {
          blarg = 1; // <-- reference error, programmatic
          // do your SELECT * FROM Users where email=? ... etc.
          if (error) {
               return resolve({ error }); // <-- operational sql error
          :
          :
          if (resultsRowsFromQuery.length === 0) {
             // vvvvv operational error: user not found
             return resolve({ error: new Error("User not in database") });
          }
          :
          // hash password & salt, etc etc etc ...
          :
          return resolve({ result: resultRowsFromQuery[0].id });
      });
   });
}
1
  • "only way is to treat even error as if they are success" ... that's exactly where I was headed but was approaching it with caution since I haven't seen many examples of "real world" node code, just blogger's 101 examples. thanks!
    – user3909192
    Mar 12, 2018 at 2:23
1

I cannot find a clear example how to avoid programming every catch to ascertain if a Promise rejection error is programmatic or operational.

This is because there isn't one. In standards and by design, promise handling MUST catch program errors by placing try/catch blocks around calls to

  • Promise executor functions,
  • callbacks registered by then or .catch on a promise (onFulfilled or orRejected handlers), and
  • calls to the then method of a promise-like object created in a different code library

and if an error is caught, reject the promise being constructed, or that was returned by then or catch, with the error. No wriggle room.

There is some expectation that in a perfect world developers will read the error message and debug programmatic errors before putting code into production.

So in untested code you would need to re-insert try/catch statements in executor and handler code to catch program errors. Process errors caught by catch as you wish and throw it again if you want to reject the promise for the same reason.

You could also throw your own kind of special object in such a catch block for programmatic errors that could be tested and detected by .catch handlers further down the promise chain.

2
  • "This is because there isn't one." I had that feeling, but this stuff is evolving so rapidly that it seems best practices of one year become documented methods a year or two later. Just asking the experts to see what their experience has been. Thanks!
    – user3909192
    Mar 12, 2018 at 2:30
  • Sure. At the end of the day the only examinable difference will be in the error object or reason value. "Best practice" suggests use of an Error object for rejection, to just checking the type of object will not help.
    – traktor
    Mar 12, 2018 at 3:14
0

Node JS doesn't provide any built-in mechanism to do this. But it is possible to do this manually by checking the 'type' parameter of the error object inside catch statement.

In case of programming error, the value in type will be one of EvalError,RangeError,ReferenceError,SyntaxError,TypeErro or URIError.

If you don't want to do this manually then take a look at bounce npm module.

1
  • I did try doing a typeof check for a reject string, but one of the NPM modules I was using (forget which) was throwing a string, so I could not be certain only my error strings would be caught and not have to be parsed. I like the idea of using resolve to handle operational errors and catch to handle programmatic (as shown above by @binariedMe)
    – user3909192
    Mar 12, 2018 at 18:51

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