2

So... I have code more or less along these lines:

class Foo(bytes):
    def __bytes__(self):
        return b'prefix' + super().__bytes__()

But unique taste for consistency of Python core developers gets in my way, and this attempt fails miserably.

Looking at methods defined on bytes class, I see no way to reproduce its default printing behavior in subclasses.

Or maybe there is a way?

29
  • 2
    super.__bytes__()? You mean super().__bytes__()? Mar 12 '18 at 13:43
  • 1
    Sure, but I was correcting the lack of parenthesis following super. Mar 12 '18 at 13:45
  • 1
    What is the actual question? What are you trying to achieve? Mar 12 '18 at 13:46
  • 2
    @chepner That's not true at all. Otherwise subclassing inbuilt types would be impossible. Dunder methods are part of python's explicit public api. Mar 12 '18 at 13:50
  • 2
    @chepner If you never call dunder methods, you must never subclass. I'm always writing super().__init__() and super().__new__(cls, *args). Mar 12 '18 at 13:58
3

Just to sum up the comments, the answer is as below (I'm surprised you tried the harder method first):

class Foo(bytes):
    def __bytes__(self):
        return b'prefix' + self

I think bytes not implementing __bytes__() is a bit weird though, and I would raise that as an issue with the python dev team.

2
  • 1
    In hindsight it seems obvious that you don't need to have __bytes__ on bytes to get a bytes, but str has __str__, so it is indeed a bit misleading. Also, for a second there I was expecting to get a stack overflow :) Mar 12 '18 at 14:08
  • Close, but not 100%. Now imagine having to use this in super(bytes, Foo) context... super(bytes, Foo).__bytes__() is undefined, but super(bytes, Foo) is not a kind of bytes, it's a special super object...
    – wvxvw
    Mar 12 '18 at 15:13

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