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Both this answer on Stack Overflow and cppreference.com suggest turning off stream synchronization to improve performance, arguing that stream synchronization would disable buffering.

Now this is what I do not understand. Why can't synchronized streams simply share buffers? I imagined that if the streams are synchronized, std::fputc(stdout, c); could simply be implemented in terms of std::cout << c; or the other way round (or using a common primitive). So whenever C I/O is mixed with C++ I/O, synchronized streams would even have an advantage over non-synchronized ones! Fewer buffers, fewer cache misses.

The current C++ standard draft seems to be with me here. In the footnote where sync_with_stdio() is specified, it says "In practical terms, synchronization usually means that a standard iostream object and a standard stdio object share a buffer." Is it possible that the links I posted above merely document some imperfect implementations and their performance implications?

Also, because I do not see any theoretical disadvantage of non-synchronized streams, I am wondering why these exist in the first place.

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  • As a side note, cppreference suggests that sync_with_stdio() impacts the thread safety of the standard streams. I think that is just plain wrong. Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 15:08
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    std::streambuf and whatever buffers underpin stdio can't be the same (they have different interfaces). So, from my reading of the link, std::streambuf implementation outputs to stdio buffer without doing any buffering itself. So they do share a buffer but iostreams have one extra layer of indirection to get to it. Also they must have additional thread locking so as to remain thread-safe with stdio operations.
    – Galik
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 15:19
  • I don't quite follow. Synchronization or not, both share the same device, which must always be accessed mutually exclusively. So a single mutex to protect both cin and stdin at the same time should suffice, no? Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 15:43
  • Well C++ doesn't have access to the ultimate device, that's the shell's responsibility. But even so, before you get to the device you have the shared buffer which needs a mutex between stdio and iostream. I suppose they could share a mutex for that, but that would couple both libraries together quite strongly and I have no idea what demons lie there. Regardless I think iostream probably has to have its own independent locking to fulfill its thread-safe obligations across all streams, not just cin/cout. So I suspect it has to lock two mutexes to sync with stdio.
    – Galik
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 16:06
  • @purefanatic sync_with_stdio() impacts the thread safety of the standard streams as specified in eel.is/c++draft/iostream.objects#overview-5
    – Cubbi
    Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 1:46

2 Answers 2

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std::fputc(stdout, c); could simply be implemented in terms of std::cout << c; or the other way round (or using a common primitive)

It is actually "the other way round". The synchronized std::cout is an unbuffered stream, and each std::cout << c; immediately executes std::fputc(stdout, c);.

synchronized streams would even have an advantage over non-synchronized ones! Fewer buffers, fewer cache misses

It's just one buffer either way: stdout's when synchronized or std::cout's when not. On my gcc/libstdc++, the main difference is that one is 1024 bytes and the other is 8191 (seriously). It might be interesting to profile the three existing implementations of the standard library (libstdc++, libc++, and MSVC) to spot the differences and what causes them. It may very well be that they are "imperfect implementations" - there is no reason unsynchronized std::cout << c; should ever be slower than (always synchronized) std::fputc(stdout, c);.

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  • "each std::cout << c; immediately executes std::fputc(stdout, c);." that seems reasonable, nice. But are you sure about "It's just one buffer either way: stdout's when synchronized or std::cout's when not." Wouldn't C-style I/O still use stdout's buffer in the non-synchronized case, while C++-style I/O would use its own? In this case, two buffers would be coexisting. That's why my point is rather the other way round. I think that there should be no reason for synchronized I/O being slower than unsynchronized I/O! Commented Mar 17, 2018 at 18:17
  • yes, C I/O uses stdout's buffer. I meant "for C++ I/O" there's one buffer either way. As for slowness, synchronized incurs the cost of a mutex. That's why C I/O usually comes with nonportable unsynchronized API, such as GNU putchar_unlocked
    – Cubbi
    Commented Mar 18, 2018 at 3:52
  • 8191 or is it 8192? defined as BUFSIZ (note: 8192 on Nix's and 512 on windows) The base macro in gcc source is _IO_BUFSIZ Commented Mar 25, 2018 at 6:06
  • @DavidC.Rankin yes, stdio_filebuf says it uses BUFSIZ, but when I run with strace, I am seeing calls to write() with the size of 8191
    – Cubbi
    Commented Mar 25, 2018 at 15:01
  • Lord knows where the extra byte goes, there is no question it is defined as 8192 in the source. -- If that's the only byte I lose in a day -- it's been a good day. Commented Mar 25, 2018 at 17:57
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There is a perfect answer here that I recommend reading. According to that answer originally writen by Ionut, "If you disable the synchronization, then C++ streams are allowed to have their own independent buffers". It is also discussed here in this book, in chapter 11 I think.

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