0

I'm trying to print a list with {} curly braces. For example:

the_list = [1, 2, 3]

and I want to print the list as

{1, 2, 3}

How can I do that? Thanks!

2
  • 9
    Do not name lists list in python. It overrides the builtin list Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:23
  • 2
    Also, if all the values in your list are unique, you can print(set(your_list)) ;) Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:25

7 Answers 7

6

You can do this like this:

print('{' + ', '.join([str(x) for x in the_list]) + '}')

', '.join joins each element with a ', '

[str(x) for x in the_list] makes each number a string so it can be joined as above.

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  • 4
    Even shorter: '{' + ', '.join(map(str, the_list)) + '}'.
    – 9000
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:25
  • 1
    Not really: I'm trying to introduce higher-order functions to a Python beginner :)
    – 9000
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:27
  • 1
    Try to never concatenate strings, as it clutters readability and has poor performance issues (as soon as you concatenate more than 2 strings!) Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:42
5

In Python 2, try:

my_list = [1, 2, 3]
print '{{{}}}'.format(', '.join(map(str, my_list)))

In Python 3, try:

my_list = [1, 2, 3]
print(f'{{{", ".join(map(str, my_list))}}}')

Explanation:

Format

Whenever you're looking to get one of your objects in a specific format, check .format() https://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#str.format

It uses {} as placeholders (can be made more complex, that's just a simple example). And to escape { and }, just double it, like so: "{{ }}". This latter string, after formatting, will become "{ }".

In Python 3, you now have f-strings https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0498/ They work the same as ''.format() but they are more readable: ''.format() => f''.

Casting elements into str

Then, you want all your elements (in the list) to be transformed into strings -> map(str, my_list).

Joining elements

And then, you want to glue each of these elements with ", ". In Python, there is a function that does just that: https://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#str.join

', '.join(my_iterable) will do it.

Reserved keywords

And last but not least, do not name your list list. Otherwise, you'll rewrite the builtin list and you won't be able to use lists anymore. Check this answer for a good list of these keywords: https://stackoverflow.com/a/22864250/8933502

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  • 2
    Question is tagged with 3.x, so add the parens needed for 3.x. Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:30
  • @TerryJanReedy Just realized that. I've added the Python 3 answer. Thanks for pointing this out! :-) Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:49
5

print(str(list).replace('[','{').replace(']','}'))

this converts the list to a string and replaces "[]" with "{}"

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  • This is a hack on the representation of the list. Please use the items of the list instead. Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:25
  • 2
    this works for op so its good enough... simple question simple answer no need for complexity @SamuelGIFFARD
    – Garret
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:27
  • 1
    3.x question should get answer for 3.x Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:30
  • 2
    @9000 No, it is faster. I measured using timeit. For the short list of 3, this method takes 3/4 of the time required for GIFFARDS map answer. For long lists (10000) the advantage grows to 1/2 the time (twice as fast). Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:51
  • 1
    At least someone comes with some actual proof and it proves me right nice try ;) thanks for the info @TerryJanReedy
    – Garret
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:53
1

If you want to get hacky:

>>> l = [1, 2, 3]
>>> '{%s}' % str(l).strip('[]')
>>> {1, 2, 3}
1

There are two approaches to answering this question:

A. Modify str(alist) by replacing [] with {}. @Garret modified the str result calling str.replace twice. Another approach is to use str.translate to make both changes at once. A third, and the fastest I found, is to slice off [ and ], keep the content, and add on { and }.

B. Calculate what str(alist)[1:-1] calculates but in Python code and embed the result in {...}. With CPython, the multiple replacements proposed for building the content string are much slower:

import timeit

expressions = (  # Orderd by timing results, fastest first.
    "'{' + str(alist)[1:-1] + '}'",
    "str(alist).replace('[','{').replace(']','}')",
    "str(alist).translate(table)",
    "'{' + ', '.join(map(str, alist)) + '}'",
    "'{{{}}}'.format(', '.join(map(str, alist)))",
    "'{' + ', '.join(str(c) for c in alist) + '}'",
    )

alist = [1,2,3]
table = str.maketrans('[]', '{}')
for exp in expressions:
    print(eval(exp))  # Visually verify that exp works correctly.

alist = [1]*100  # The number can be varied.
n =1000
for exp in expressions:
    print(timeit.timeit(exp, number=n, globals=globals()))

Results with 64-bit 3.7.0b2 on Windows 10:

{1, 2, 3}
{1, 2, 3}
{1, 2, 3}
{1, 2, 3}
{1, 2, 3}
{1, 2, 3}
0.009153687000000021
0.009371952999999988
0.009818325999999988
0.018995990000000018
0.019342450999999983
0.028495214999999963

The relative results are about the same for 1000 and 10000.

EDIT: @Mike Müller independently posted the slice expression, embedded in the following two expressions, with essentially the same timings as the top expression above.

"f'{{{str(alist)[1:-1]}}}'",
"'{%s}' % str(alist)[1:-1]",
0
('{}'.format(the_list)).replace('[','{').replace(']','}')

Result

{1, 2, 3}
4
  • This works, but let's face it, it's a terrible practice.
    – 9000
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:28
  • @9000: The whole thing is peculiar anyway.
    – Bill Bell
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:29
  • I don't think so. If you want to use the heavy machinery of .format, why not "{{{0}}}".format(', '.join(...)).
    – 9000
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:34
  • Definitely. I'm adamant about this. I use .format wherever possible. In fact any time I can make my code more abstruse I do it. It's bait.
    – Bill Bell
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 17:37
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Using Python 3.6 f-strings:

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3]
>>> print(f'{{{str(lst)[1:-1]}}}')
{1, 2, 3}

or with format for Python < 3.6:

>>> print('{{{}}}'.format(str(lst)[1:-1]))
{1, 2, 3}

or with the old, but not deprecated %:

>>> print('{%s}' % str(lst)[1:-1])
{1, 2, 3}

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