First thing, I understand (almost) fold functions. Given the function I can work out easily what will happen and how to use it.

The question is about the way it is implemented which leads to slight difference in the function definition which took some time to understand.To make matters worse most example for folds have same type of the list and default case, which does not help in the understranding as these can be different.

Usage: 
  foldr f a xs
  foldl f a xs
where a is the default case 
definition:
  foldr: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b
  foldl: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> [b] -> a

In definition I understand a is the first variable to be passed and b second variable to be passed to function.

Eventually I understood that this is happening due to the fact that when f finally gets evaluated in foldr it is implemented as f x a (i.e. default case is passed as second parameter). But for foldl it is implemented as f a x (i.e. default case is passed as first parameter).

Would not the function definition be same if we had passed the default case as same (either 1st parameter in both or 2nd) in both cases? Was there any particular reason for this choice?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To make things a little clearer, I will rename a couple type variables in your foldl signature...

foldr: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b
foldl: (b -> a -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b

... so that in both cases a stands for the type of the list elements, and b for that of the fold results.

The key difference between foldr and foldl can be seen by expanding their recursive definitions. The applications of f in foldr associate to the right, and the initial value shows up to the right of the elements:

foldr f a [x,y,z] = x `f` (y `f` (z `f` a))

With foldl, it is the other way around: the association is to the left, and the initial value shows up to the left (as Silvio Mayolo emphasises in his answer, that's how it has to be so that the initial value is in the innermost sub-expression):

foldl f a [x,y,z] = ((a `f` x) `f` y) `f` z

That explains why the list element is the first argument to the function given to foldr, and the second to the one given to foldl. (One might, of course, give foldl the same signature of foldr and then use flip f instead of f when defining it, but that would achieve nothing but confusion.)

P.S.: Here is a good, simple example of folds with the types a and b different from each other:

foldr (:) [] -- id
foldl (flip (:)) [] -- reverse

A fold is a type of catamorphism, or a way of "tearing down" a data structure into a scalar. In our case, we "tear down" a list. Now, when working with a catamorphism, we need to have a case for each data constructor. Haskell lists have two data constructors.

[] :: [a]
(:) :: a -> [a] -> [a]

That is, [] is a constructor which takes no arguments and produces a list (the empty list). (:) is a constructor which takes two arguments and makes a list, prepending the first argument onto the second. So we need to have two cases in our fold. foldr is the direct example of a catamorphism.

foldr :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b

The first function will be called if we encounter the (:) constructor. It will be passed the first element (the first argument to (:)) and the result of the recursive call (calling foldr on the second argument of (:)). The second argument, the "default case" as you call it, is for when we encounter the [] constructor, in which case we simply use the default value itself. So it ends up looking like this

foldr (+) 4 [1, 2, 3]
1 + (2 + (3 + 4))

Now, could we have designed foldl the same way? Sure. foldl isn't (exactly) a catamorphism, but it behaves like one in spirit. In foldr, the default case is the innermost value; it's only used at the "last step" of the recursion, when we've run out of list elements. In foldl, we do the same thing for consistency.

foldl (+) 4 [1, 2, 3]
((4 + 1) + 2) + 3

Let's break that down in more detail. foldl can be thought of as using an accumulator to get the answer efficiently.

foldl (+) 4 [1, 2, 3]
foldl (+) (4 + 1) [2, 3]
foldl (+) ((4 + 1) + 2) [3]
foldl (+) (((4 + 1) + 2) + 3) []
-- Here, we've run out of elements, so we use the "default" value.
((4 + 1) + 2) + 3

So I suppose the short answer to your question is that it's more consistent (and more useful), mathematically speaking, to make sure the base case is always at the innermost position in the recursive call, rather than focusing on it being on the left or the right all the time.

  • Thanks for the detailed and, and the code breakdown. However I think your last para "short ans...." might not be very accurate as it is not only about consistency but also correct to ensure that a left associative function try and pass the left value as 1st parameter (left position) while for the right associative function the value is on the right or as second parameter. – peeyush singh Mar 13 at 14:31

Consider the calls foldl (+) 0 [1,2,3,4] and foldr (+) 0 [1,2,3,4] and try to visualize what they do:

foldl (+) 0 [1,2,3,4] = ((((0 + 1) + 2) + 3) + 4)
foldr (+) 0 [1,2,3,4] = (0 + (1 + (2 + (3 + 4))))

Now, let's try to swap the arguments to the call to (+) in each step:

foldl (+) 0 [1,2,3,4] = (4 + (3 + (2 + (1 + 0))))

Note that despite the symmetry this is not the same as the previous foldr. We are still accumulating from the left of the list, I've just changed the order of operands.

In this case, because addition is commutative, we get the same result, but if you try to fold over some non-commutative function, e.g. string concatenation, the result is different. Folding over ["foo", "bar", "baz"], you would obtain "foobarbaz" or "bazbarfoo" (while a foldr would result in "foobarbaz" as well because string concatenation is associative).

In other words, the two definitions as they are make the two functions have the same result for commutative and associative binary operations (like common arithmetic addition/multiplication). Swapping the arguments to the accumulating function breaks this symmetry and forces you to use flip to recover the symmetric behavior.

The two folds yield different results due to their opposite associativity. The base value always shows up within the inner most parens. List traversal happens the same way for both folds.

right fold with (+) using the prefix notation

foldr (+) 10 [1,2,3]
=> + 1 (+ 2 (+ 3 10))
=> + 1 (+ 2 13)
=> + 1 15
=> 16

foldl (+) 10 [1,2,3]
=> + (+ (+ 10 1) 2) 3
=> + (+ 11 2) 3
=> + 13 3
=> 16

both folds evaluate to the same result because (+) is commutative, i.e.

+ a b == + b a

lets see what happens when the function is not commutative, e.g. division or exponentiation

foldl (/) 1 [1, 2, 3]
=> / (/ (/ 1 1) 2) 3
=> / (/ 1 2) 3
=> / 0.5 3
=> 0.16666667

foldr (/) 1 [1, 2, 3]
=> / 1 (/ 2 (/ 3 1))
=> / 1 (/ 2 3)
=> / 1 0.666666667
=> 1.5

now, lets evaluate foldr with function flip (/)

let f = flip (/)
foldr f 1 [1, 2, 3]
=> f 1 (f 2 (f 3 1))
=> f 1 (f 2 0.3333333)
=> f 1 0.16666667
=> 0.16666667

similarly, lets evaluate foldl with f

foldl f 1 [1, 2, 3]
=> f (f (f 1 1) 2) 3
=> f (f 1 2) 3
=> f 2 3
=> 1.5

So, in this case, flipping the order of the arguments of the folding function can make left fold return the same value as a right fold and vice versa. But that is not guaranteed. Example:

foldr (^) 1 [1, 2, 3] = 1
foldl (^) 1 [1, 2, 3] = 1
foldr (flip (^)) 1 [1,2,3] = 1
foldl (flip (^)) 1 [1,2,3] = 9 -- this is the odd case
foldl (flip (^)) 1 $ reverse [1,2,3] = 1 
-- we again get 1 when we reverse this list

incidentally, reverse is equivalent to

foldl (flip (:)) [] 

but try defining reverse using foldr

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