3

I'm working on a python exercise that requires getting the string return values of function. Here is the sample code that is related to the one I'm currently working on.

def main():
    x = 'the quick'
    y = 'brown fox'
    return x, y

def function1(x, y):
    if x == 'the quick' and y == 'brown fox':
        return 'jump'
    else:
        return 'lazy'

def function2():
    if a == 'jump':
        print('good boy')
    else:
        print('bad boy')

function2(*function1(*main()))

I'm getting positional argument error. How to return the string properly for other function?

  • 1
    Can you paste the error here, I got a different error when I ran your code (i got TypeError: function2() takes no arguments (4 given)). – Joseph Farah Mar 13 '18 at 4:06
  • Good question... However, I would recommend using decorators instead. – A.Wenn Mar 13 '18 at 5:08
  • "TypeError: function2() takes 0 positional arguments but 4 were given" – pythonoverflow Mar 13 '18 at 5:27
0

At first you have to specify parameters for function2: I guess you want to define function2 in this way:

    def function2(a):
        if a == 'jump':
        print('good boy')
    else:
        print('bad boy')

And you may want funtion2 output 'good boy', In this way, you could try:

function2(function1(*main()))

Which will give the output as you want.

  • I forgot to put a parameter and I put an asterisk in function1 which iterates the word instead. Thanks @Lei_Bai – pythonoverflow Mar 13 '18 at 5:22
6

You have not specified that Function2() takes any arguments.

I got your code to run by specifying four function arguments (while only using one):

def main():
    x = 'the quick'
    y = 'brown fox'
    return x, y

def function1(x, y):
    if x == 'the quick' and y == 'brown fox':
        return 'jump'
    else:
        return 'lazy'

def function2(a, b, c, d):
    if a == 'jump':
        print('good boy')
    else:
        print('bad boy')

function2(*function1(*main()))

This returns:

bad boy
  • 1
    Maybe *args and args[0] == 'jump' would be more in the spirit of splatting the return value of function1 into function2? But then being explicit about 4 arguments probably demonstrates what' going on more clearly, so maybe it's better this way. – abarnert Mar 13 '18 at 4:16
  • This also made sense, it shows what happens to returned value. I mistakenly put an asterisk to function1 that splits the returned value. – pythonoverflow Mar 13 '18 at 5:24

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