0

Following code compile and run on GCC compiler.

#include <stdio.h>

 int arr[10];

 int func()
 {
      printf("In func\n");
      return 0;
 }

int main() 
{
    if (&arr[func()])
        printf("In main\n");
     return 0;
}

Output:

In main

Why does not execute printf("In func\n"); ?

12
  • What does this line of code do if (&arr[func()])? When will the address of any element of arr be zero? Are you sure you have no DOS control characters in your code? Getting any compiler warnings? What? – David C. Rankin Mar 13 '18 at 5:29
  • 1
    Or at least make sure you have 'saved' since you posted the code, then compile with warnings enabled and proceed. – David C. Rankin Mar 13 '18 at 5:38
  • 1
    I just pasted your code and got In func/In main. (gcc 5.4.0) – lockcmpxchg8b Mar 13 '18 at 5:38
  • 3
    @BasileStarynkevitch this is indeed a gcc issue. With gcc 7.3, func() is optimized out of main() completely. Even though it produces output. Earlier versions of gcc handle it fine. Really strange. .string "In func" is stored, the func() function is there, but it is completely omitted from the code generation for main: So @Jayesh ain't crazy. – David C. Rankin Mar 13 '18 at 6:02
  • 1
    Please state whether you are aware of the content of the link provided by @PkmX in their answer. The similarity of the code examples is striking. If you are trying to test StackOverflowers, I vote to applaude PkmX. – Yunnosch Mar 13 '18 at 8:05
3

There seems to be a subtle issue, either intended, or unintended with various combinations of the latest gcc. ver 7.3 on the latest kernel 4.15.8 on Archlinux. For whatever reason the call to func() is omitted for the code generated for main(). e.g.

$ gcc -S -masm=intel -o infunc2.asm infunc2.c

The generated assembly is:

$ cat infunc2.asm
        .file   "infunc2.c"
        .intel_syntax noprefix
        .text
        .comm   arr,40,32
        .section        .rodata
.LC0:
        .string "In func"
        .text
        .globl  func
        .type   func, @function
func:
.LFB0:
        .cfi_startproc
        push    rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        .cfi_offset 6, -16
        mov     rbp, rsp
        .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
        lea     rdi, .LC0[rip]
        call    puts@PLT
        mov     eax, 0
        pop     rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
        ret
        .cfi_endproc
.LFE0:
        .size   func, .-func
        .section        .rodata
.LC1:
        .string "In main"
        .text
        .globl  main
        .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB1:
        .cfi_startproc
        push    rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        .cfi_offset 6, -16
        mov     rbp, rsp
        .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
        lea     rdi, .LC1[rip]
        call    puts@PLT
        mov     eax, 0
        pop     rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
        ret
        .cfi_endproc
.LFE1:
        .size   main, .-main
        .ident  "GCC: (GNU) 7.3.0"
        .section        .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

Note the call to func() is labeled .LFB0: above. The procedure for main: does not call func or .LFB0: at all, despite it being present, and despite the "In func" string being present in .LC0:. I suspect this is not intended behavior.

For example, simple compilation without optimization -O0 the function is not called, e.g.:

$ gcc -g -O0 -o bin/if2 infunc2.c
$ ./bin/if2
In main

Changing the code to store the address of arr[func()] does force func() to be called, e.g.

#include <stdio.h>

int arr[10];

int func()
{
    printf ("In func\n");
    return 0;
}

int main (void)
{
    int *p = &arr[func()];
    if (p)
        printf("In main\n");
    return 0;
}

Then

$ gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -std=gnu11 -Ofast -o bin/infunc infunc.c
$ ./bin/infunc
In func
In main

And the generated assembly supports the different behavior:

$ gcc -S -masm=intel -o infunc.asm infunc.c

$ cat infunc.asm
        .file   "infunc.c"
        .intel_syntax noprefix
        .text
        .comm   arr,40,32
        .section        .rodata
.LC0:
        .string "In func"
        .text
        .globl  func
        .type   func, @function
func:
.LFB0:
        .cfi_startproc
        push    rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        .cfi_offset 6, -16
        mov     rbp, rsp
        .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
        lea     rdi, .LC0[rip]
        call    puts@PLT
        mov     eax, 0
        pop     rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
        ret
        .cfi_endproc
.LFE0:
        .size   func, .-func
        .section        .rodata
.LC1:
        .string "In main"
        .text
        .globl  main
        .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB1:
        .cfi_startproc
        push    rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        .cfi_offset 6, -16
        mov     rbp, rsp
        .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
        sub     rsp, 16
        mov     eax, 0
        call    func
        cdqe
        lea     rdx, 0[0+rax*4]
        lea     rax, arr[rip]
        add     rax, rdx
        mov     QWORD PTR -8[rbp], rax
        cmp     QWORD PTR -8[rbp], 0
        je      .L4
        lea     rdi, .LC1[rip]
        call    puts@PLT
.L4:
        mov     eax, 0
        leave
        .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
        ret
        .cfi_endproc
.LFE1:
        .size   main, .-main
        .ident  "GCC: (GNU) 7.3.0"
        .section        .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

I wish I could provide some logical explanation for the handling here, but I can only document it. Seems we need to talk with the guys on the gcc list.


Side effects discarded in address computation inside 'if'

This seems to be a regression in gcc that will appear depending on whether an individual distro applies enough patching to mask it. It is a gcc bug in work. Bug 84607

4
  • You should report a bug on your Linux distribution. BTW, On Debian/Sid I don't observe that. – Basile Starynkevitch Mar 13 '18 at 6:25
  • That could also explain some recent unexplained issue with the distro :(. Thanks for the feedback. – David C. Rankin Mar 13 '18 at 6:26
  • Maybe your distro has some strange spec file which forces some optimization – Basile Starynkevitch Mar 13 '18 at 6:27
  • I think this is just a pure regression somewhere in the gcc line of things on Arch. There are a couple of unexplained errors on the Arch list today (one mine), whatever is causing this seems like a perfect candidate for the problems. "Houston -- we have a problem..." – David C. Rankin Mar 13 '18 at 6:28
2

This is a gcc bug (#84607) and has been fixed in gcc 7.3.1 or later.

1
  • 1
    This seems to be the source of the basic idea of the code quote in the question. – Yunnosch Mar 13 '18 at 8:01
1

The problem is with your compilation. I use gcc to compile. I compiled your file like this:

gcc main.c -o prog
./prog
In func
In main

Seems good to me. Check the procedure on how to compile with you compiler if you use a different compiler than gcc. Also I use gcc 7.3

2
  • 1
    And with GCC 7.3 the same output happens with -O, -O2, -O3. – Basile Starynkevitch Mar 13 '18 at 6:07
  • GCC 7.3.0 on a Mac shows the bug for me (both this version and the one from GCC Bug #84607 — with -O0, -O1, -O2 or -O3. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '18 at 8:35

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