2

When using aggregate() by columns you specify which columns you want to e.g summarise over in a list.

For instance:

aggregate(mtcars$qsec, by = list(as.factor(mtcars$cyl),
                                      as.factor(mtcars$carb)), FUN = sum)

 Group.1 Group.2      x
1       4       1  96.89
2       6       1  39.66
3       4       2 113.62
4       8       2  68.24
5       8       3  53.00
6       6       4  70.68
7       8       4  98.97
8       6       6  15.50
9       8       8  14.60

Why is a list() necessary here, why not a vector?

  • 2
    In your example you have two vectors in by=. BTW: I prefer the formula interface of aggregate(), e.g.: aggregate(qsec ~ cyl, data=mtcars, FUN = sum) – jogo Mar 13 '18 at 9:16
  • 2
    aggregate(qsec ~ cyl + carb, data=mtcars, FUN = sum) – jogo Mar 13 '18 at 9:24
  • 1
    Thanks, that is a better syntax but I'm still interested in an answer of my question :) – FilipW Mar 13 '18 at 9:53
  • 1
    In that case you don't give aggregate the data but the column names. How is aggregate supposed to know, that it should look in mtcars for these names and not somewhere else? aggregate wants data, not names of data. That's what fortune(85) says. If you want something different, you can go ahead and write yourself a wrapper function. – Bernhard Mar 13 '18 at 10:11
  • 3
    But this is concatenating the vectors and leads to a single vector twice the length. You want two different vectors of the same length, not a single longer one. – Bernhard Mar 13 '18 at 10:29

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