1

This question already has an answer here:

I have just started this week to learn ASP.Net core 2.0 with EF Core and MVC using C#. So i am a complete Noob.

Is they a way to create a dynamic Switch (SortOrder) using a dynamic parameters pulled from a Model/restful API? this is so my Switch statements don't end up 30+ cases deep.

i am looking for something on the lines of this Sudo:

switch (sortOrder)
{
    default:
        Tickets = Tickets.OrderBy(s => s.ID);
        break;
    foreach (string Tick in Tickets)
        {
        case Tick :
           Tickets = Tickets.OrderBy(T => Tick);
           break;
 }

for reference part of my TicketController

public async Task<IActionResult> Index(string sortOrder, string searchString)
{
    //sorting
    ViewData["NameSortParm"] = String.IsNullOrEmpty(sortOrder) ? "ID" : "";
    ViewData["DateSortParm"] = sortOrder == "ID" ? "Environment" : "Date";
    ViewData["CurrentFilter"] = searchString;

    var Tickets = from s in _context.MyTickets
                   select s;
    // search
    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(searchString))
    {
        Tickets = Tickets.Where(T => T.ID.ToString().Contains(searchString)
                               || T.Environment.Contains(searchString)
                               || T.YourRef.Contains(searchString)
                               || T.Priority.Contains(searchString)
                               || T.Type.Contains(searchString)
                               || T.ProductName.Contains(searchString)
                               || T.Environment.Contains(searchString)
                               || T.Version.Contains(searchString)
                               || T.Description.Contains(searchString)
                               || T.Status.Contains(searchString)
                               || T.Contact.Contains(searchString));
    }
    ////sorting
    //switch (sortOrder)
    //{
    //    case "ID":
    //        Tickets = Tickets.OrderByDescending(s => s.ID);
    //        break;
    //    case "Date":
    //        Tickets = Tickets.OrderBy(s => s.CreatedDate);
    //        break;
    //    case "Environment":
    //        Tickets = Tickets.OrderBy(s => s.Environment);
    //        break;
    //    default:
    //        Tickets = Tickets.OrderBy(s => s.ID);
    //        break;
    //}

    switch (sortOrder)
    {
        default:
            Tickets = Tickets.OrderBy(s => s.ID);
            break;
        foreach (string Tick in Tickets)
            {
                case Col :
            Tickets = Tickets.OrderBy(T => Col)
       }


    }


    // return results
    return View(await Tickets.AsNoTracking().ToListAsync());
}

marked as duplicate by DavidG c# Mar 13 '18 at 12:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Have a look into OData. You can pass through filtering and ordering (among other options) when creating a OData compliant REST-API. See odata.org/documentation/odata-version-2-0/uri-conventions Section 4.2 This is supported by WCF as well as ASP.NET Web API. – Fildor Mar 13 '18 at 11:42
  • Consider using Dynamic LINQ – user3559349 Mar 13 '18 at 11:49
  • I've flagged this as a duplicate question, but take a look at this answer on how to order using expressions which is relevant with Entity Framework. – DavidG Mar 13 '18 at 12:02
0

This will use reflection to sort by a property matching the sortOrder string:

    Tickets = Tickets.OrderBy(s => s.GetProperty(sortOrder).GetValue(s));

The sortOrder will need to exactly match the name of the property you want to sort by ("CreatedDate", not "Date").

Alternatively you can change your method signature to accept a function instead of a string for the sortOrder:

public async Task<IActionResult> Index(Func<Ticket, object> sortOrder, string searchString)
{
    ...

    Tickets = Tickets.OrderBy(s => sortOrder(s));

    ...
}

And you can call this passing (s => s.Environment, ...

  • This will cause the ordering to happen in the client app rather than the database though... – DavidG Mar 13 '18 at 11:54
  • Or more likely this will just throw errors – DavidG Mar 13 '18 at 11:55
  • Both true. Need exception handling! – Steve Harris Mar 13 '18 at 11:55
  • No, I mean if Tickets is an IQueryable, using something like EF Core, it will get passed along to the provider which will explode when trying to figure out what to do. So, what you are proposing is not possible unless you force the ordering to happen on the client. – DavidG Mar 13 '18 at 11:57
  • The only way to do this with EF would be to create an Expression manually, and that's pretty complex though I'm sure there will be a dupe on the site somewhere. – DavidG Mar 13 '18 at 12:00

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.