92

I would like to implement a method with the following signature

dynamic Cast(object obj, Type castTo);

Anyone know how to do that? obj definitely implements castTo but needs to be cast properly in order to have some of my app's runtime binding stuff work out.

Edit: If some of the answers don't make sense it's because I initially accidentally typed dynamic Cast(dynamic obj, Type castTo); - I mean the input should be object or some other guaranteed base class

3
  • Are you saying that you need to dynamically call an implicit or explicit conversion operator?
    – Gabe
    Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 19:47
  • either one but at the moment, explicit Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 19:48
  • 2
    Related (I was looking for C#'s version of dynamic_cast and Google brought me here, but the answer is in another thread): stackoverflow.com/questions/9316159/…
    – Jason C
    Commented Oct 27, 2019 at 23:20

9 Answers 9

136

I think you're confusing the issues of casting and converting here.

  • Casting: The act of changing the type of a reference which points to an object. Either moving up or down the object hierarchy or to an implemented interface
  • Converting: Creating a new object from the original source object of a different type and accessing it through a reference to that type.

It's often hard to know the difference between the 2 in C# because both of them use the same C# operator: the cast.

In this situation you are almost certainly not looking for a cast operation. Casting a dynamic to another dynamic is essentially an identity conversion. It provides no value because you're just getting a dynamic reference back to the same underlying object. The resulting lookup would be no different.

Instead what you appear to want in this scenario is a conversion. That is morphing the underlying object to a different type and accessing the resulting object in a dynamic fashion. The best API for this is Convert.ChangeType.

public static dynamic Convert(dynamic source, Type dest) {
  return Convert.ChangeType(source, dest);
}

EDIT

The updated question has the following line:

obj definitely implements castTo

If this is the case then the Cast method doesn't need to exist. The source object can simply be assigned to a dynamic reference.

dynamic d = source;

It sounds like what you're trying to accomplish is to see a particular interface or type in the hierarchy of source through a dynamic reference. That is simply not possible. The resulting dynamic reference will see the implementation object directly. It doesn't look through any particular type in the hierarchy of source. So the idea of casting to a different type in the hierarchy and then back to dynamic is exactly identical to just assigning to dynamic in the first place. It will still point to the same underlying object.

5
  • Hey Jared, I am looking for casting, but you do make a good point, I mistyped the question, it should be from object (or some other base class) to dynamic. Will correct it now. Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 20:05
  • 1
    @George in that case why not just cast to dynamic directly? There shouldn't be a need for this method if the underlying operation is truly a cast
    – JaredPar
    Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 20:06
  • the use case is an object of BaseType is passed in, and I have a IList<dynamic> handlers where each handler implements IHandle<T> where T : BaseType. I need to run all the handlers that apply to this particular type since dynamic cannot guess correctly (might be because IHandle is covariant). I got it working using reflection but oy vey. Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 20:13
  • 1
    in C# there is no such thing as "Casting" in the sense of changing the type of a reference. In C# conversions and casts are the same. incidentally when you upcast an object up its inheritance tree, it's type doesn't change or need to change because it is an object of the higher type. Casting 'int' to 'double' creates a new 'double' equal to the original 'int' , although Casting an 'HttpWerbRequest' to 'WebRequest' doesn't do anything, because 'HttpWebRequest' is a 'WebRequest'. and the reference type vs value type part....
    – AK_
    Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:15
  • 3
    nice code... but why call the method Convert? System namespace trap. call it DynamicConvert or similar.
    – phil soady
    Commented Oct 5, 2013 at 14:36
47

This should work:

public static dynamic Cast(dynamic obj, Type castTo)
{
    return Convert.ChangeType(obj, castTo);
}

Edit

I've written the following test code:

var x = "123";
var y = Cast(x, typeof(int));
var z = y + 7;
var w = Cast(z, typeof(string)); // w == "130"

It does resemble the kind of "typecasting" one finds in languages like PHP, JavaScript or Python (because it also converts the value to the desired type). I don't know if that's a good thing, but it certainly works... :-)

5
  • 1
    Hmm, about to try it but wouldn't this always return this downcast to object? Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 19:53
  • @Keith: just tested it, and it does work with String (which is a class, not a value type).
    – rsenna
    Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 20:00
  • 7
    Only because String is IConvertible. The type you use must be produced using the IConvertible methods, because the method just makes the appropriate Convert.ToABCD() call. So, it still limits your ability to convert between reference types. String happens to be the exception, since IConvertible requires you to implement ToString.
    – KeithS
    Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 20:08
  • 3
    Yeah, this doesn't work for entity types (which is my use-case) Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 20:09
  • 2
    @George Mauer: So your use-case does not make sense to me. As @JaredPar answer explains, an object is an object - if you are already using a dynamic reference to it, you should be able to access its methods and/or properties without any problem. So maybe the problem is your use-case... BTW, that's why I (wrongly) assumed you were just trying to get a fast conversion method for simple typed values.
    – rsenna
    Commented Feb 8, 2011 at 20:11
13

I realize this has been answered, but I used a different approach and thought it might be worth sharing. Also, I feel like my approach might produce unwanted overhead. However, I'm not able to observer or calculate anything happening that is that bad under the loads we observe. I was looking for any useful feedback on this approach.

The problem with working with dynamics is that you can't attach any functions to the dynamic object directly. You have to use something that can figure out the assignments that you don't want to figure out every time.

When planning this simple solution, I looked at what the valid intermediaries are when attempting to retype similar objects. I found that a binary array, string (xml, json) or hard coding a conversion (IConvertable) were the usual approaches. I don't want to get into binary conversions due to a code maintainability factor and laziness.

My theory was that Newtonsoft could do this by using a string intermediary.

As a downside, I am fairly certain that when converting the string to an object, that it would use reflection by searching the current assembly for an object with matching properties, create the type, then instantiate the properties, which would require more reflection. If true, all of this can be considered avoidable overhead.

C#:

//This lives in a helper class
public static ConvertDynamic<T>(dynamic data)
{
     return Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(data));
}

//Same helper, but in an extension class (public static class),
//but could be in a base class also.
public static ToModelList<T>(this List<dynamic> list)
{
    List<T> retList = new List<T>();
    foreach(dynamic d in list)
    {
        retList.Add(ConvertDynamic<T>(d));
    }
}

With that said, this fits another utility I've put together that lets me make any object into a dynamic. I know I had to use reflection to do that correctly:

public static dynamic ToDynamic(this object value)
{
    IDictionary<string, object> expando = new ExpandoObject();

    foreach (PropertyDescriptor property in TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(value.GetType()))
        expando.Add(property.Name, property.GetValue(value));

    return expando as ExpandoObject;
}

I had to offer that function. An arbitrary object assigned to a dynamic typed variable cannot be converted to an IDictionary, and will break the ConvertDynamic function. For this function chain to be used it has to be provided a dynamic of System.Dynamic.ExpandoObject, or IDictionary<string, object>.

1
  • 1
    Now that I am in the future, I know dynamics were exactly designed to hold functions parsed from Python scripts. So, ya, they can hold functions, and yes, this is not the best. I wouldn't use my second code example anymore, even if it works. It adds overhead.
    – JRodd
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 3:50
10

Best I got so far:

dynamic DynamicCast(object entity, Type to)
{
    var openCast = this.GetType().GetMethod("Cast", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
    var closeCast = openCast.MakeGenericMethod(to);
    return closeCast.Invoke(entity, new[] { entity });
}
static T Cast<T>(object entity) where T : class
{
    return entity as T;
}
6
  • Pretty much what I ended up with after your initial comment.
    – KeithS
    Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 20:11
  • 3
    It doesn't make sense to me. How is the call DynamicCast(obj, typeof(Foo)) any different from (dynamic)obj, except that you get a null reference in the case where obj (which has compile-time type object) happens not to be a Foo? Also, the constraint where T : object is meaningless and disallowed. Commented May 2, 2013 at 13:05
  • 1
    @JeppeStigNielsen It's a matter of boxing. Suppose you have Person with a GetFullName method and Professor : Person which overrides GetFullName to suffix it with "PhD". Now suppose that entity is of type Professor but cast as a Person outside of our method, maybe that's how its loaded by an ORM or a model binder or something. if you call ((dynamic)entitity).GetFullName() it will run Person.GetFullName(). It's been a long time since this issue has come up for me so the specifics might be a bit wrong but it had to do with this. Commented May 2, 2013 at 14:46
  • 2
    It still doesn't make sense. First of all, "boxing" as you write has to do with value types (like structs) being put into reference type variables. Your example with Professor and Person necessarily involves classes, not structs. Secondly, if Professor overrides the method, the virtual dispatch will ensure that the "most derived" implementation is used. Even if method hiding was taking place, the method DynamicCast above wouldn't be helpful. In all cases, DynamicCast(obj, typeof(Foo)) is equivalent, as it seems, to (obj is Foo) ? (dynamic)obj : null. Just use (dynamic)obj. Commented May 2, 2013 at 15:17
  • 4
    You seem to believe that (dynamic)(BaseClass)x can behave differently than (dynamic)(DerivedClass)x when x is an instance of DerivedClass. But where should this difference come from? The object doesn't remember what type of references once referred to it. Commented May 2, 2013 at 15:18
7

The opensource framework Dynamitey has a static method that does late binding using DLR including cast conversion among others.

dynamic Cast(object obj, Type castTo){
    return Dynamic.InvokeConvert(obj, castTo, explict:true);
}

The advantage of this over a Cast<T> called using reflection, is that this will also work for any IDynamicMetaObjectProvider that has dynamic conversion operators, ie. TryConvert on DynamicObject.

3

Try a generic:

public static T CastTo<T>(this dynamic obj, bool safeCast) where T:class
{
   try
   {
      return (T)obj;
   }
   catch
   {
      if(safeCast) return null;
      else throw;
   }
}

This is in extension method format, so its usage would be as if it were a member of dynamic objects:

dynamic myDynamic = new Something();
var typedObject = myDynamic.CastTo<Something>(false);

EDIT: Grr, didn't see that. Yes, you could reflectively close the generic, and it wouldn't be hard to hide in a non-generic extension method:

public static dynamic DynamicCastTo(this dynamic obj, Type castTo, bool safeCast)
{
   MethodInfo castMethod = this.GetType().GetMethod("CastTo").MakeGenericMethod(castTo);
   return castMethod.Invoke(null, new object[] { obj, safeCast });
}

I'm just not sure what you'd get out of this. Basically you're taking a dynamic, forcing a cast to a reflected type, then stuffing it back in a dynamic. Maybe you're right, I shouldn't ask. But, this'll probably do what you want. Basically when you go into dynamic-land, you lose the need to perform most casting operations as you can discover what an object is and does through reflective methods or trial and error, so there aren't many elegant ways to do this.

3
  • 2
    This doesn't work (without reflection) if T isn't known at compile type.
    – jason
    Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 19:49
  • @KiethS, Type is provided during runtime. I know, don't ask. I suppose I could write this and use reflection to close the generic but there's got to be a better way. Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 19:49
  • 1
    @George: I don't believe you'll be able to get around using reflection here. Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 19:51
2

Slight modification on @JRodd version to support objects coming from Json (JObject)

public static dynamic ToDynamic(this object value)
    {
        IDictionary<string, object> expando = new ExpandoObject();

        //Get the type of object 
        Type t = value.GetType();

        //If is Dynamic Expando object
        if (t.Equals(typeof(ExpandoObject)))
        {
            foreach (PropertyDescriptor property in TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(value.GetType()))
                expando.Add(property.Name, property.GetValue(value));
        }
        //If coming from Json object
        else if (t.Equals(typeof(JObject)))
        {
            foreach (JProperty property in (JToken)value)
                expando.Add(property.Name, property.Value);
        }
        else //Try converting a regular object
        {
            string str = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(value);
            ExpandoObject obj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<ExpandoObject>(str);

            return obj;
        }

       

        return expando as ExpandoObject;
    }
2

You can use the expression pipeline to achieve this:

 public static Func<object, object> Caster(Type type)
 {
    var inputObject = Expression.Parameter(typeof(object));
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<object,object>>(Expression.Convert(inputObject, type), inputPara).Compile();
 }

which you can invoke like:

object objAsDesiredType = Caster(desiredType)(obj);

Drawbacks: The compilation of this lambda is slower than nearly all other methods mentioned already

Advantages: You can cache the lambda, then this should be actually the fastest method, it is identical to handwritten code at compile time

-4

Alternatively:

public static T Cast<T>(this dynamic obj) where T:class
{
   return obj as T;
}
3
  • 5
    The requirement seems to be that the type is specified at runtime.
    – Jimmy
    Commented Feb 7, 2011 at 19:51
  • The first parameter of an extension method cannot be of type 'dynamic' Commented Jul 16, 2020 at 11:33
  • He was using it to say any type could be there. This is not bad if you don't take it super literal, and a psudo example.
    – JRodd
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 3:58

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