16

In Spring Boot 1.5.x, I've had Security configured and in certain profiles (e.g. local), I've added security.basic.enabled=false line to the .properties file to disable all security for that profile. I'm trying to migrate to the new Spring Boot 2, where that configuration property is removed. How can I achieve the same behaviour (without using this property) in Spring Boot 2.0.x?

I've already read Spring-Boot-Security-2.0 and security-changes-in-spring-boot-2-0-m4 and there is nothing regarding this property.

3
  • this property is listed as a breaking change here : github.com/spring-projects/spring-boot/wiki/…
    – KeatsPeeks
    Mar 13, 2018 at 14:33
  • @KeatsPeeks Yes, that's true. That's why I'm asking how can I achieve the same behaviour in Spring Boot 2 (without this property, of course).
    – leonz
    Mar 13, 2018 at 14:36
  • 1
    @dur Yes, that's also true. That's why I'm asking how to do it. Most of the SO answers on disabling the security use that configuration property. All others use Profile annotation to disable the configuration bean for certain profiles, but that is not the behaviour I want since Spring Security requires login by default. I want to disable login completely for those certain profiles.
    – leonz
    Mar 13, 2018 at 15:02

7 Answers 7

17

You have to add a custom Spring Security configuration, see Spring Boot Reference Guide:

28.1 MVC Security

The default security configuration is implemented in SecurityAutoConfiguration and UserDetailsServiceAutoConfiguration. SecurityAutoConfiguration imports SpringBootWebSecurityConfiguration for web security and UserDetailsServiceAutoConfiguration configures authentication, which is also relevant in non-web applications. To switch off the default web application security configuration completely, you can add a bean of type WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter (doing so does not disable the UserDetailsService configuration or Actuator’s security).

For example:

@Configuration
public class ApplicationSecurity extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    public void configure(WebSecurity web) throws Exception {
        web
           .ignoring()
               .antMatchers("/**");
    }
}

To use the configuration only for a profile add @Profile to the class. If you want to enable it by property, add ConditionalOnProperty to the class.

1
  • 2
    Note that if you have multiple security configurations that are not mutually exclusive, you should also define the @Order. For example, if your primary security config uses the default profile (has no @Profile specified) and you add a dev profile to another config, then when you are running with the dev profile active Spring will have to decide which config takes precedence. Jul 27, 2018 at 17:09
10

Here is how I ended up solving the problem. Here is an example of how my security config looked in Spring Boot 1.5.x. Security was disabled with property security.basic.enabled=false:

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    public void configure(WebSecurity web) throws Exception {
        web.ignoring().antMatchers("/upload/**");
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.csrf().disable().authorizeRequests()
                .anyRequest().authenticated()
                .and().httpBasic();
    }
}

Since security.basic.enabled was removed in Spring Boot 2 (but still reserved as property name), I ended up using security.enabled as a custom property. Here's an example of how my config looks in Spring Boot 2:

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Value("${security.enabled:true}")
    private boolean securityEnabled;

    @Override
    public void configure(WebSecurity web) throws Exception {
        if (securityEnabled)
            web.ignoring().antMatchers("/upload/**");
        else
            web.ignoring().antMatchers("/**");
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        if (securityEnabled)
            http.csrf().disable().authorizeRequests()
                    .anyRequest().authenticated()
                    .and().httpBasic();
    }
}
2
  • 1
    I think most complete answer imo.... For security.ignored = "*.js" . what if you want to ignore some static resources do we still use web.ignore()? or its completely different...
    – Eric Huang
    Sep 11, 2018 at 5:14
  • 1
    You can add @ConditionalOnProperty(prefix = "spring", name = "security.enabled") on SecurityConfig class to avoid if-else inside configure()
    – Muzammil
    Oct 2, 2019 at 15:40
5

There is another option to disable security in spring boot 2

@EnableAutoConfiguration(exclude = {SecurityAutoConfiguration.class})

Add this over the main class

0
1

Spring Boot 2.1.3

For a certain profile "dev"

Create a new Spring Configuration class

@Configuration
@EnableAutoConfiguration(exclude = {SecurityAutoConfiguration.class})
@Profile("dev")
public class WebSecurityConfigDisable  {

}

This will disable the spring security.

1

You can disable spring security auto-configuration by excluding SecurityAutoConfiguration.class and ManagementWebSecurityAutoConfiguration.class has to excluded when got spring-boot-actuator dependency

@SpringBootApplication(
exclude = { SecurityAutoConfiguration.class,  
            ManagementWebSecurityAutoConfiguration.class })
public class MySpringBootApplication {

Then you can conditionally configure your custom WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter using profile or config paramter something like this

@Configuration
@ConditionalOnProperty(prefix = "security.custom", name = "enabled", havingValue="true")
@EnableWebSecurity
public class CustomWebSecurityConfiguration extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
0

Actually there are several answers for certain configurations for this question; in my case I have been playing around Spring Boot 2 with Spring Security and JWT. In order to secure my REST endpoints I need to create tokens etc. After I wrote my code and tried to test my endpoints to see if JWT works fine, I end up facing default login page. I tried changing properties file mentioned above and finally I disabled it by adding the @SpringBootApplication(exclude = {SecurityAutoConfiguration.class} ) annotation to my application class.

@SpringBootApplication(exclude = {SecurityAutoConfiguration.class} )
public class JwtWithSpringBootApplication {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(JwtWithSpringBootApplication.class, args);
    }
}
1
  • 1
    Your answered not really the question, because you are only disabling Spring Boot's default configuration, but not your own custom configuration.
    – dur
    Jul 27, 2018 at 17:00
-1

In springboot 2.1.4 I had to do this

@EnableAutoConfiguration(exclude = {SecurityAutoConfiguration.class, SecurityFilterAutoConfiguration.class})
2
  • This caused the following runtime error for me: Parameter 0 of method inMemoryUserDetailsManager in org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.security.servlet.UserDetailsServiceAutoConfiguration required a bean of type 'org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.security.SecurityProperties' that could not be found.
    – Brandon
    May 21, 2019 at 13:40
  • Brandon, sounds like you need security enabled? May 21, 2019 at 22:17

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