I have a sorted array. I would like to iterate through the array and increment a counter as I find pairs of values. I'm not finding an elegant solution to this.

var pairs = 0
    let colors = [10, 20, 20, 10, 10, 30, 50, 10, 20
    let sortedColors = colors.sorted{ $0 < $1}
    // [10, 10, 10, 10, 20, 20, 20, 30, 50] -> pairs should equal 3

    for i in 0..<colors.count - 1 {
        if sortedColors[i+1] != colors.count && sortedColors[i] == sortedColors[i+1] {
            pairs += 1
        } 
    }

print(pairs)
  • When you say "pairs" do you mean values that occur more than once? Can you define what a "pair of values" is. It's hard to tell from your question. :) – Fogmeister Mar 13 at 16:44
  • values that occur twice. [10,10,10,10] would be two pairs. pairs == 2 – Martin Muldoon Mar 13 at 16:46
  • Sorry, maybe I was a bit quick to dupe-mark this one. Should I re-open? – dfri Mar 13 at 16:46
  • Surely that should be three pairs? (0, 1) (1, 2) (2, 3) are all pairs? OK... in the array [1, 2, 2, 3] is that 1 pair or 0? – Fogmeister Mar 13 at 16:47
  • @dfri I think so :) – Fogmeister Mar 13 at 16:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

An alternative but similar approach as @Sulthan's answer is to use a dictionary to count occurrences rather than NSCountedSet:

let colors = [10, 20, 20, 10, 10, 30, 50, 10, 20]
let numberOfPairs = colors
  .reduce(into: [:]) { counts, num in counts[num, default: 0] += 1 }
  .reduce(0) { cumsum, kv in cumsum + kv.value / 2 } // 3

Or, using shorthand argument names in the two closures:

let numberOfPairs = colors
  .reduce(into: [:]) { $0[$1, default: 0] += 1 }
  .reduce(0) { $0 + $1.value / 2 }

Where above, for the number occurrence count, we make use of @vacawama's answer in the Q&A that I initially used as target for dupe-marking this Q&A.

  • 1
    Thanks for that. I'm glad I asked. I've been studying map, reduce, and filter... still got a long way to go. Cheers! – Martin Muldoon Mar 13 at 17:12

You could as well use new Dictionary syntax like so,

With grouping syntax,

let pairs = Dictionary(grouping: colors){ $0 }
                        .map { $1.count / 2 }
                        .reduce(0, +)
print(pairs)

With uniquing syntax,

let pairs = Dictionary( zip( colors, Array(repeating: 1, count: colors.count)),
                       uniquingKeysWith: +)
                      .reduce(0, { $0 + $1.1 / 2})
  • 1
    Beauty. Nicest answer here, IMO. – Alexander Mar 13 at 18:05
  • 1
    I don't get how the second example works, it seems quite unclear – Alexander Mar 13 at 18:49
  • 1
    @Alexander I also agree that this is neat, but it should be noted that it might not be as efficient as the other two answers, as it unnecessarily creates a number of arrays (the values of the Dictionary; e.g. [50: [50], 10: [10, 10, 10, 10], 20: [20, 20, 20], 30: [30]]) all having the same member repeated a number of times, where the sole information used in these same-element arrays is their count. Nice nonetheless with an alternative approach to the "frequency counting" ones of the other answer! The second approach above (although not as neat) is kind of clever though. – dfri Mar 13 at 19:04
  • 1
    First one, a bit tighter: let pairs = Dictionary(grouping: colors){ $0 }.map { $1.count / 2 }.reduce(0, +) – vacawama Mar 13 at 19:19
  • 1
    @vacawama I wanted to write exactly the same! A single Dictioary.reduce call could be used but I like it better this way. Or just a map over .values. – Sulthan Mar 13 at 19:20

I would just count the repetitions and then divide the number of repetitions by 2 to count the pairs. For example, if a number appears 3 times, there is one pair:

let colors = [10, 20, 20, 10, 10, 30, 50, 10, 20]

let countedSet = NSCountedSet(array: colors)
let pairs = countedSet.map { countedSet.count(for: $0) / 2 }.reduce(0, +)
print(pairs) // 3

Unfortunately, there is no Swift CountedSet yet :(

  • In your array there are only 2 pairs. 20, 20 and 10, 10. – Fogmeister Mar 13 at 16:59
  • @Fogmeister There are two "10" pairs – Sulthan Mar 13 at 16:59
  • 1
    @Fogmeister Note that I have skipped the sorting because I don't need it, therefore I don't have to care which pairs are adjacent. – Sulthan Mar 13 at 17:02
  • 1
    I got that solution too, but used directly map on countedSet and didn't use allObjects in between. Just wondering since I'm not a Swift developer the benefits or potential issues. – Larme Mar 13 at 17:11
  • 1
    @Larme I just didn't realize that I can use map directly. – Sulthan Mar 13 at 17:12

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