I am trying to print the tuple new_zoo given below without brackets:

zoo=('python','elephant','penguin')
new_zoo=('monkey','camel',zoo)

I know usually we can use ', '.join(...). But because here the new_zoo tuple contains a inside tuple zoo, so when I use ', '.join(new_zoo) it shows:

TypeError: sequence item 2: expected str instance, tuple found

Can anyone help me with this question?

  • You can just add the tuples together: new_zoo=('monkey','camel') + zoo – dotcomly Mar 13 at 20:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to add the tuples instead of nesting them:

>>> new_zoo = ('monkey', 'camel') + zoo

Another way to create a flattened tuple is to use star unpacking (colloquially known as splat sometimes):

>>> new_zoo = ('monkey', 'camel', *zoo)
>>> print(new_zoo)
('monkey', 'camel', 'python', 'elephant', 'penguin')

You can assemble the string directly in this case: ', '.join(new_zoo).

If you need to process a nested tuple, the most general way would be a recursive solution:

>>> new_zoo = ('monkey', 'camel', zoo)
>>> def my_join(tpl):
...    return ', '.join(x if isinstance(x, str) else my_join(x) for x in tpl)
>>> my_join(new_zoo)
monkey, camel, python, elephant, penguin

First, you are adding zoo to your tuple new_zoo. You should unwrap it to extend new_zoo instead.

zoo = ('python', 'elephant', 'penguin')
new_zoo = ('monkey', 'camel', *zoo) # ('monkey', 'camel', 'python', 'elephant', 'penguin')

Then for printing, one clean way to do is to unwrap your tuple in print and provide a separator.

print(*new_zoo, sep=', ')
# prints: monkey, camel, python, elephant, penguin

If you want to store the printed string, there you can use str.join.

new_zoo_string = ', '.join(new_zoo) # 'monkey, camel, python, elephant, penguin'

You have to join the contents of zoo as well:

zoo=('python','elephant','penguin')
new_zoo=('monkey','camel',','.join(zoo))
final_zoo = ','.join(new_zoo)

Output:

'monkey,camel,python,elephant,penguin'

However, you can also iterate over the contents of new_zoo and apply str.join:

zoo=('python','elephant','penguin')
new_zoo=('monkey','camel',zoo)
final_zoo = ','.join([i if not isinstance(i, tuple) else ','.join(i) for i in new_zoo])

Output:

'monkey,camel,python,elephant,penguin'

TypeError: sequence item 2: expected str instance, tuple found

As the error message says: The item 2 in new_zoo (remember to start counting from 0, so it's the last item) needs to be of str type for join, but it is a tuple instead.

It seems that you want to extend your zoo tuple, but you're plugging it as an item into zoo instead. So to speak, you're putting a box into another box, instead of the items in the first box into the second one.

You probably meant to do something like this:

new_zoo=('monkey','camel')+zoo

Just track the tuple and then use recursion , Now no matter how many nested tuple you have :

zoo=('python','elephant','penguin')
zoo1=('example1','example2',zoo)
zoo2=('example3','example4',zoo1)
new_zoo=('monkey','camel',zoo2)

def flat_tuple(tuple_s):
    final=[]
    for i in tuple_s:
        if isinstance(i,tuple):
            final.extend(flat_tuple(i))
        else:
            final.append(i)

    return final


for sub in flat_tuple(new_zoo):
    print(sub)

output:

monkey
camel
example3
example4
example1
example2
python
elephant
penguin
zoo = ('python', 'elephant', 'penguin')
new_zoo = ('monkey', 'camel', zoo)


# One liner
print(', '.join(map(lambda x: x if isinstance(x, str) else ', '.join(x) if hasattr(x, '__iter__') else str(x), new_zoo)))

# Recursive and powerful
def req_join(x):
    if isinstance(x, str):
        return x
    elif hasattr(x, '__iter__'):
        return ', '.join(map(req_join, x))
    else:
        return str(x)
big_zoo = ('cat', new_zoo, range(5), 'dog', 123, ('lev1', ('lev2', ('lev3', ('lev4', ('lev5', range(5)))))))
print(req_join(big_zoo))

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