0

Why is this program not working?

available_toppings = ["mushrooms", "olives", "green peppers", "pepperoni", "pineapple", "extra cheese"]

requested_toppings = ['mushrooms', 'olives', 'extra cheese']

if requested_toppings in available_toppings:
    for requested_topping in requested_toppings:
        print("Adding " + requested_topping.title() + ".")
    print("Finalising your order.")

else:
    print("sorry we dont have these toppings")

and the output is

sorry we dont have these toppings

6 Answers 6

3

You want to check that requested_toppings list is a subset of available_toppings.

You could use set.issubset() function.

available_toppings = ["mushrooms", "olives", "green peppers", "pepperoni", "pineapple", "extra cheese"]

requested_toppings = ['mushrooms', 'olives', 'extra cheese']

if set(requested_toppings).issubset(available_toppings):
    for requested_topping in requested_toppings:
        print("Adding " + requested_topping.title() + ".")
    print("Finalising your order.")

else:
    print("sorry we dont have these toppings")

This would result in

Adding Mushrooms.
Adding Olives.
Adding Extra Cheese.
Finalising your order.

If you replace, say, olives with shrimps in requested_toppings you would get

sorry we dont have these toppings

as expected.

1

There are two beautiful functions in python, all() and any(). Try to use all():

available_toppings = ["mushrooms", "olives", "green peppers", "pepperoni", "pineapple", "extra cheese"]

requested_toppings = ['mushrooms', 'olives', 'extra cheese']

if all(topping in available_toppings for topping in requested_toppings):
    for requested_topping in requested_toppings:
        print("Adding " + requested_topping.title() + ".")
    print("Finalising your order.")

else:
    print("sorry we dont have these toppings")

What's wrong with your code? You checking if list is an element of another list, like:

>>> [1,2] in [1,2,3]
False
>>> [1,2] in [[1,2],3]
True
1

It looks like you switched the order of the for loop and the if condition. Maybe you wanted the following:

  • For each requested topping, check if it is in available toppings

Instead of checking if the whole requested list is in the other available list, you can try the following:

available_toppings = ["mushrooms", "olives", "green peppers", "pepperoni", "pineapple", "extra cheese"]

requested_toppings = ['mushrooms', 'olives', 'extra cheese']

for requested_topping in requested_toppings:
    if requested_topping in available_toppings:
        print("Adding " + requested_topping.title() + ".")
    else:
        print("sorry we dont have these toppings")

print("Finalising your order.")
2
  • This will start adding toppings even if not all of them available! Mar 14, 2018 at 4:48
  • @Abdo Yes, thanks, it will only add those which are available. Waiting for reply if it has to disregard whole request if any of them is not available. Then, this will be wrong answer and I can remove it.
    – niraj
    Mar 14, 2018 at 4:49
0

Not exactly What you wanted, but very easy to adapt.

available_toppings = ["mushrooms", "olives", "green peppers", "pepperoni", "pineapple", "extra cheese"]
requested_toppings = ["mushrooms", "olives", "extra cheese", "onions"]
RQ = []
for requested in requested_toppings:
    RQ.append(requested)
for available in available_toppings:
    for R in RQ:
        if R in available:print "We have :",R
if R not in available:print "Do not Have : ",R 
RESULTS:
We have : mushrooms
We have : olives
We have : extra cheese
Do not Have :  onions
0

try this:

available_toppings = ["mushrooms", "olives", "green peppers", "pepperoni", "pineapple", "extra cheese"]

requested_toppings = ['mushrooms', 'olives', 'extra cheese']
hasItem = True
for requested_topping in requested_toppings:
    if requested_topping not in available_toppings:   
        hasItem = False   
if hasItem:
    for requested_topping in requested_toppings:
        print("Adding " + requested_topping.title() + ".")
    print("Finalising your order.") 
else:
        print("sorry we dont have these toppings") 
3
  • But this will print spurious "Adding" messages if they have the first few toppings but not all of them.
    – abarnert
    Mar 14, 2018 at 5:02
  • Oh, I see, it seems I misunderstood the expecting result, let me fix it
    – Alucard
    Mar 14, 2018 at 5:30
  • Instead of using hasItem, I have to use set to check if the requested topping is all avaliable like the answer above, otherwise it will be too long to read...like ↑
    – Alucard
    Mar 14, 2018 at 6:00
0

For a different approach—probably not better than the existing answers, in fact probably worse—but it does demonstrate an interesting ideas in a simple way.

try:
    output = []
    # Notice that we're not pre-checking here. So this will
    # work even if requested_toppings is a one-shot iterator.
    for requested_topping in requested_toppings:
        if requested_topping in available_toppings:
            # Don't actually print, because that's irreversible;
            # do it "off to the side" or "in a transaction" that we
            # can "commit" or "rollback".
            output.append("Adding " + requested_topping.title() + ".")
        else:
            # Here's where we "rollback"
            raise KeyError(requested_topping)
except KeyError:
    # Discard the "transaction" by just not doing anything with it.
    # And now we're out of the "pure" section of the code, so we
    # can do I/O without worrying.
    print("sorry we dont have these toppings")
else:
    # "Commit" by just printing the output.
    print(*output, sep='\n')
    # And again, we're out of the pure code now, so just print
    print("Finalising your order.")

To explain a bit more:

The only tricky part of this problem is that you don't want to start adding toppings if you don't have all of them (because then you'd give the customer false hope—and you might have to throw away a whole pizza).

The obvious solution is just to check whether you have all the toppings in advance, by using a subset test (as in Dmitri Chubarov's answer) or an all loop (as in Amaro Vita's) or just a for statement. That works fine in this case, so that's what you should probably do.

But there are some problems where you can't do that. Maybe requested_toppings is an iterator that you either can't repeat, or would be very expensive to repeat. Or maybe it's very hard to test in advance, and all you can do is try all the operations and see if one of them fails. For those problems, you need some way to avoid doing expensive and irreversible things like adding pizza toppings or launching the missiles. That's when you use a solution like this one.

Of course you could do the same thing without an exception, just by using break for rollback and a else clause on the for for commit, but it seems like more people find forelse confusing than exceptions.

One last thing: All of the solutions, including mine, are a little better if you turn available_toppings into a set instead of a list. The only thing you're ever going to do with it is in tests, and that's what sets are made for. (And it's not only a conceptual difference, but a performance one—you can do in tests on a set in constant time, while with a list, it has to check all of the values for each test.)

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