2

I already tried to find a solution to my problem but I didn't find it so I post it here.

I want to read a file and then create two 1D arrays from the data I got. the file is like that:

  • 1st line: number of data to collect
  • other lines: data i want to get

Here is my file :

7
1.  4.1
2.  8.2
5  19.5
12 50
20  78
30  50.05
50  5

7 is the number of line I want to get (I want all the lines from 1. to 50).

The code I wrote return me a segmentation fault but I don't understand why.
Here is what I wrote :

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <math.h>
    #include <stdlib.h> 

    int main(void)
    {
      /* DECLARATION OF CONSTANTS AND VARIABLES */
      FILE* fichier = NULL;
      double* x = NULL;
      double* y = NULL;
      int k,n = 0;

     /* OPENING FILE */
      fichier = fopen("donnees1.txt", "r+");

          if (fichier != NULL)
             {
              fscanf(fichier, "%d", &n);

              /* creating dynamic array of x and y */
              x = malloc(n * sizeof(int));
              y = malloc(n * sizeof(int));

              if (x == NULL)
                 {
                  printf("failed to allocate.\n");
                  exit(0);
                 }

              for(k = 0; k < n; k++)
                 {
                  fscanf(fichier, "%lf %lf", &x[k], &y[k]);
                  printf("%lf %lf\n", x[k],y[k]);
                 }
              /* Closing file */
              fclose(fichier);
             }
          else
            {
             printf("Cannot open the file.\n");
            }

      /* Freeing memory */
      free(x);
      free(y);
      return 0;
    }

This is what the program is returning me :

1.000000 4.100000
2.000000 8.200000
5.000000 19.500000
12.000000 50.000000
20.000000 78.000000
30.000000 50.050000
50.000000 5.000000
Segmentation fault

Thank you for your help and for your attention !

  • 2
    Are x and y pointers to double or int? On almost all platforms sizeof(double) > sizeof(int). – Some programmer dude Mar 14 '18 at 10:08
  • Why would the compiler complain about this ? – Tom's Mar 14 '18 at 10:11
  • Yes thank you, I realized it too when I read my post. Sorry for the inconvenience ! – LutinRose Mar 14 '18 at 10:11
  • 1
    Your code has a problem. What happens If malloc returns NULL on Y? Y= malloc() ? You check X, but you do not check Y. You call free() on unchecked Pointer (Y) and this is not a good approach. – Michi Mar 14 '18 at 10:18
  • @Michi you're right, thank you. – LutinRose Mar 14 '18 at 10:20
5

The code I wrote return me a segmentation fault ? segmentation fault causing statement is below as memory allocation for x and y is not correct.

x = malloc(n * sizeof(int));
y = malloc(n * sizeof(int));

(because on most machines sizeof(double) is bigger than sizeof(int) so there's not enough room for the array elements after a while)

It should be

x = malloc(n * sizeof(*x)); /* it works for any type */
y = malloc(n * sizeof(*y));
  • that's the way of doing it to avoid type mistakes. Can you elaborate on how it didn't work earlier? – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 10:12
  • I edited to add the info I wanted you to add :) feel free to revert (but I don't think you will). – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 10:43
  • I didn't saw your previous comment otherwise i could have edited. @Jean-FrançoisFabre Edited part added more clarity in my answer. thanks for that. – Achal Mar 14 '18 at 10:50
5

Nevermind, I found the solution.
It's just that I use malloc badly. I wrote

x = malloc(n * sizeof(int));

When I should have written

x = malloc(n * sizeof(double));
  • it's a classic, but difficult to close as duplicate. I'm keeping this question as duplicate target. Nice try at answering, thanks for letting us know that it fixed the issue – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 10:12
  • 2
    Better, it should be "x = malloc (n * sizeof(*x))" and you can't have mismatch type, even if you change the type of "x" – Tom's Mar 14 '18 at 10:12

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