14

I'm trying to create a dataset from a CSV file with 784-bit long rows. Here's my code:

import tensorflow as tf

f = open("test.csv", "r")
csvreader = csv.reader(f)
gen = (row for row in csvreader)
ds = tf.data.Dataset()
ds.from_generator(gen, [tf.uint8]*28**2)

I get the following error:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-22-4b244ea66c1d> in <module>()
     12 gen = (row for row in csvreader_pat_trn)
     13 ds = tf.data.Dataset()
---> 14 ds.from_generator(gen, [tf.uint8]*28**2)

~/Documents/Programming/ANN/labs/lib/python3.6/site-packages/tensorflow/python/data/ops/dataset_ops.py in from_generator(generator, output_types, output_shapes)
    317     """
    318     if not callable(generator):
--> 319       raise TypeError("`generator` must be callable.")
    320     if output_shapes is None:
    321       output_shapes = nest.map_structure(

TypeError: `generator` must be callable.

The docs said that I should have a generator passed to from_generator(), so that's what I did, gen is a generator. But now it's complaining that my generator isn't callable. How can I make the generator callable so I can get this to work?

EDIT: I'd like to add that I'm using python 3.6.4. Is this the reason for the error?

3 Answers 3

14

The generator argument (perhaps confusingly) should not actually be a generator, but a callable returning an iterable (for example, a generator function). Probably the easiest option here is to use a lambda. Also, a couple of errors: 1) tf.data.Dataset.from_generator is meant to be called as a class factory method, not from an instance 2) the function (like a few other in TensorFlow) is weirdly picky about parameters, and it wants you to give the sequence of dtypes and each data row as tuples (instead of the lists returned by the CSV reader), you can use for example map for that:

import csv
import tensorflow as tf

with open("test.csv", "r") as f:
    csvreader = csv.reader(f)
    ds = tf.data.Dataset.from_generator(lambda: map(tuple, csvreader),
                                        (tf.uint8,) * (28 ** 2))
1
  • thank you for simple and clear explanation Apr 27 at 10:18
4

Yuck, two years later... But hey! Another solution! :D

This might not be the cleanest answer but for generators that are more complicated, you can use a decorator. I made a generator that yields two dictionaries, for example:

>>> train,val = dataloader("path/to/dataset")
>>> x,y = next(train)
>>> print(x)
{"data": [...], "filename": "image.png"}

>>> print(y)
{"category": "Dog", "category_id": 1, "background": "park"}

When I tried using the from_generator, it gave me the error:

>>> ds_tf = tf.data.Dataset.from_generator(
    iter(mm),
    ({"data":tf.float32, "filename":tf.string},
    {"category":tf.string, "category_id":tf.int32, "background":tf.string})
    )
TypeError: `generator` must be callable.

But then I wrote a decorating function

>>> def make_gen_callable(_gen):
        def gen():
            for x,y in _gen:
                 yield x,y
        return gen
>>> train_ = make_gen_callable(train)
>>> train_ds = tf.data.Dataset.from_generator(
    train_,
    ({"data":tf.float32, "filename":tf.string},
    {"category":tf.string, "category_id":tf.int32, "background":tf.string})
    )

>>> for x,y in train_ds:
        break

>>> print(x)
{'data': <tf.Tensor: shape=(320, 480), dtype=float32, ... >,
 'filename': <tf.Tensor: shape=(), dtype=string, ...> 
}

>>> print(y)
{'category': <tf.Tensor: shape=(), dtype=string, numpy=b'Dog'>,
 'category_id': <tf.Tensor: shape=(), dtype=int32, numpy=1>,
 'background': <tf.Tensor: shape=(), dtype=string, numpy=b'Living Room'>
}

But now, note that in order to iterate train_, one has to call it

>>> for x,y in train_():
        do_stuff(x,y)
        ...
2
  • def make_gen_callable(_gen):... parts really does the help. Key point is that no arguments should be passed to gen() inside the make_gen_callable(). I don't need to make 2 different callable generators after adopting this. Jan 16 at 0:00
  • You can do yield from _gen instead of from x,y in _gen: yield x,y (this is in general the preferred way to "pass through" a generator, as it has several advantages over a for loop). In this case, however, you could return the wrapped generator directly, so even something like train_ = lambda: train should work.
    – jdehesa
    Apr 27 at 11:08
3

From the docs, which you linked:

The generator argument must be a callable object that returns an object that support the iter() protocol (e.g. a generator function)

This means you should be able to do something like this:

import tensorflow as tf
import csv

with open("test.csv", "r") as f:
    csvreader = csv.reader(f)
    gen = lambda: (row for row in csvreader)
    ds = tf.data.Dataset()
    ds.from_generator(gen, [tf.uint8]*28**2)

In other words, the function you pass must produce a generator when called. This is easy to achieve when making it an anonymous function (a lambda).

Alternatively try this, which is closer to how it is done in the docs:

import tensorflow as tf
import csv


def read_csv(file_name="test.csv"):
    with open(file_name) as f:
        reader = csv.reader(f)
        for row in reader:
            yield row

ds = tf.data.Dataset.from_generator(read_csv, [tf.uint8]*28**2)

(If you need a different file name than whatever default you set, you can use functools.partial(read_csv, file_name="whatever.csv").)

The difference is that the read_csv function returns the generator object when called, whereas what you constructed is already the generator object and equivalent to doing:

gen = read_csv()
ds = tf.data.Dataset.from_generator(gen, [tf.uint8]*28**2)  # does not work
5
  • 1
    Really? The example in the docs is a plain old generator function with yield not a function that returns a generator isn't it? Mar 14, 2018 at 14:24
  • Oh yeah, you're right, Chris. gen is a generator in the docs, not a function returning a generator.
    – Sahand
    Mar 14, 2018 at 14:25
  • 1
    @Chris_Rands Yes, that is weird. So apparently a generator defined as a function also works.
    – Graipher
    Mar 14, 2018 at 14:25
  • @Chris_Rands I think the difference is that if you call that function (which is a generator) it returns the generator object. Whereas the (x for x in ...) is already the generator object itself.
    – Graipher
    Mar 14, 2018 at 14:30
  • 2
    Yes I understand the difference, but I honestly think the name should be clearer from tensor's part like from_generator_function Mar 14, 2018 at 14:35

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