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This question already has an answer here:

Currently I am working on an animation for a website which involves two elements having their position changed over a period of time and usually reset to their initial position. Only one element will be visible at a time and everything ought to run as smoothly as possible.

Before you ask, a CSS-only solution is not possible as it is dynamically generated and must be synchronised. For the sake of this question, I will be using a very simplified version which simply consists of a box moving to the right. I shall be referring only to this latter example unless explicitly stated for the remainder of this question to keep things simple.

Anyway, the movement is handled by the CSS transition property being set so that the browser can do the heavy lifting for that. This transition must then be done away with in order to reset the element's position in an instant. The obvious way of doing so would be to do just that then reapply transition when it needs to get moving again, which is also right away. However, this isn't working. Not quite. I'll explain.

Take a look at the JavaScript at the end of this question or in the linked JSFiddle and you can see that is what I'm doing, but setTimeout is adding a delay of 25ms in between. The reason for this is (and it's probably best you try this yourself) if there is either no delay (which is what I want) or a very short delay, the element will either intermittently or continually stay in place, which isn't the desired effect. The higher the delay, the more likely it is to work, although in my actual animation this causes a minor jitter because the animation works in two parts and is not designed to have a delay.

This does seem like the sort of thing that could be a browser bug but I've tested this on Chrome, Firefox 52 and the current version of Firefox, all with similar results. I'm not sure where to go from here as I have been unable to find this issue reported anywhere or any solutions/workarounds. It would be much appreciated if someone could find a way to get this reliably working as intended. :)


Here is the JSFiddle page with an example of what I mean.

The markup and code is also pasted here:

var box = document.getElementById("box");
//Reduce this value or set it to 0 (I
//want rid of the timeout altogether)
//and it will only function correctly
//intermittently.
var delay = 25;

setInterval(function() {
  box.style.transition = "none";
  box.style.left = "1em";

  setTimeout(function() {
    box.style.transition = "1s linear";
    box.style.left = "11em";
  }, delay);
}, 1000);
#box {
  width: 5em;
  height: 5em;
  background-color: cyan;
  position: absolute;
  top: 1em;
  left: 1em;
}
<div id="box"></div>

marked as duplicate by LGSon css Mar 15 '18 at 6:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2

Force the DOM to recalculate itself before setting a new transition after reset. This can be achieved for example by reading the offset of the box, something like this:

var box = document.getElementById("box");

setInterval(function(){
      box.style.transition = "none";
      box.style.left = "1em";
      let x = box.offsetLeft; // Reading a positioning value forces DOM to recalculate all the positions after changes
      box.style.transition = "1s linear";
      box.style.left = "11em";  
    }, 1000);
body {
  background-color: rgba(0,0,0,0);
}

#box {
  width: 5em;
  height: 5em;
  background-color: cyan;
  position: absolute;
  top: 1em;
  left: 1em;
}
<div id="box"></div>

See also a working demo at jsFiddle.

Normally the DOM is not updated when you set its properties until the script will be finished. Then the DOM is recalculated and rendered. However, if you read a DOM property after changing it, it forces a recalculation immediately.

What happens without the timeout (and property reading) is, that the style.left value is first changed to 1em, and then immediately to 11em. Transition takes place after the script will be fihished, and sees the last set value (11em). But if you read a position value between the changes, transition has a fresh value to go with.

  • That simple solution seems to work really well. Thanks for editing your answer to add an explanation as to why it works! – spacer GIF Mar 14 '18 at 20:50
2

Instead of making the transition behave as an animation, use animation, it will do a much better job, most importantly performance-wise and one don't need a timer to watch it.

With the animation events one can synchronize the animation any way suited, including fire of a timer to restart or alter it.

Either with some parts being setup with CSS

var box = document.getElementById("box");
box.style.left = "11em";    // start

box.addEventListener("animationend", animation_ended, false);

function animation_ended (e) {
  if (e.type == 'animationend') {
    this.style.left = "1em";
  }
}
#box {
  width: 5em;
  height: 5em;
  background-color: cyan;
  position: absolute;
  top: 1em;
  left: 1em;
  animation: move_me 1s linear 4;
}
@keyframes move_me {
  0% { left: 1em; }
}
<div id="box"></div>

Or completely script based

var prop = 'left', value1 = '1em', value2 = '11em'; 

var s = document.createElement('style');
s.type = 'text/css';
s.innerHTML = '@keyframes move_me {0% { ' + prop + ':' + value1 +' }}';
document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(s);

var box = document.getElementById("box");
box.style.animation = 'move_me 1s linear 4';
box.style.left = value2;      // start

box.addEventListener("animationend", animation_ended, false);

function animation_ended (e) {
  if (e.type == 'animationend') {
    this.style.left = value1;
  }
}
#box {
  width: 5em;
  height: 5em;
  background-color: cyan;
  position: absolute;
  top: 1em;
  left: 1em;
}
<div id="box"></div>

  • It definitely looks better. – Teemu Mar 14 '18 at 20:22
  • @Teemu How is this a CSS only solution? ... The style is set with script – LGSon Mar 14 '18 at 20:23
  • @Teemu I updated my answer to be more clear how-to. – LGSon Mar 14 '18 at 20:33
  • 1
    My snippet doesn't redraw, it only calculates. Also, transitioned elements are out of the textflow, recalculating the position is a light-weight task to browsers, as well as rendering the page after the script execution. – Teemu Mar 14 '18 at 21:49
  • 1
    @spacerGIF All that is perfectly fine :) – LGSon Mar 15 '18 at 14:31

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