5

I'm writing a RestFramework and I'm trying to figure out how I can allow the users to create a custom name for a generic controller. I'm registering my generic controllers like so:

public class GenericControllerFeatureProvider : IApplicationFeatureProvider<ControllerFeature>
{
    public void PopulateFeature(IEnumerable<ApplicationPart> parts, ControllerFeature feature)
    {
        foreach (var entityConfig in _entityConfigurations)
        {
            var entityType = entityConfig.Type;
            var typeName = entityType.Name + "Controller";
            if (!feature.Controllers.Any(t => t.Name == typeName))
            {
                var controllerType = typeof(GenericController<>)
                    .MakeGenericType(entityType.AsType())
                    .GetTypeInfo();

               //Normally I would expect there to be an overload to configure the controller name
               //feature.Controllers.Add(controllerType, entityConfig.ControllerName);
            }
        }
    }
}

How ever I need to figure out a way that I can override the route for the controllers. The only information about this in the documentation shows how to create a controller convention like so:

public class GenericControllerNameConvention : Attribute, IControllerModelConvention
{
    public void Apply(ControllerModel controller)
    {
        if (controller.ControllerType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() != 
        typeof(GenericController<>))
        {
            return;
        }

        var entityType = controller.ControllerType.GenericTypeArguments[0];
        controller.ControllerName = entityType.Name;
    }
}

This will not work since it is done at compile time. I need user to be able to override the controller name on Startup, How can I Achieve this?

  • Can you clarify what you mean at startup? You mean that you can add entities as needed and on restart of the application controllers will automatically appear (as routes). ie. EntityA has a method Get so the route would be /entitya/get/ dynamically built? – Nico Mar 15 '18 at 4:26
  • @Nico, Yeah I want the user to be able to override the controller name in the route, so I have a generic controller registered RestController<TDTO> the user should be able to pass in a map that will override the name manually so the route would be Api/ControllerA/4 would correspond get{id} – johnny 5 Mar 15 '18 at 4:29
4

Based on your comment and code you were pretty much on par with how you would achieve this. Note I have cut down the example quite a bit so I could setup a test.

Say I have a basic generic controller as:

public class GenericController<T> : Controller
    where T: class
{

    public IActionResult Get()
    {
        return Content(typeof(T).FullName);
    }
}

I now have a typed controller with Get action. Now most of your code was right on the money. So my Feature Provider as (note i have a static array of types):

public class GenericControllerFeatureProvider : IApplicationFeatureProvider<ControllerFeature>
{
    public void PopulateFeature(IEnumerable<ApplicationPart> parts, ControllerFeature feature)
    {
        foreach (var entityConfig in ControllerEntity.EntityTypes)
        {
            var entityType = entityConfig;
            var typeName = entityType.Name + "Controller";
            if (!feature.Controllers.Any(t => t.Name == typeName))
            {
                var controllerType = typeof(GenericController<>)
                    .MakeGenericType(entityType)
                    .GetTypeInfo();

                feature.Controllers.Add(controllerType);
            }
        }
    }
}

Next the IControllerModelConvention implementation.

public class GenericControllerModelConvention : IControllerModelConvention
{
    public void Apply(ControllerModel controller)
    {
        if (!controller.ControllerType.IsGenericType || controller.ControllerType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() != typeof(GenericController<>))
        {
            return;
        }

        var entityType = controller.ControllerType.GenericTypeArguments[0];
        controller.ControllerName = entityType.Name + "Controller";
        controller.RouteValues["Controller"] = entityType.Name;
    }
}

And finally the startup is where all the magic happens. Basically we register the IControllerModelConvention into the MVC convention options, and then register the FeatureProvider.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    var mvcBuilder = services.AddMvc();
    mvcBuilder.AddMvcOptions(o => o.Conventions.Add(new GenericControllerModelConvention()));
    mvcBuilder.ConfigureApplicationPartManager(c =>
    {
        c.FeatureProviders.Add(new GenericControllerFeatureProvider());
    });
}

From my review two things struck me.

  1. I am not sure why you have your GenericControllerNameConvention as an attribute?
  2. You should implicitly set the Controller Route Value to your entity type (not the type + name).

Given two entities (EntityA and EntityB) the result of the controllers is

/Entitya/get/ prints WebApplication11.Infrastructure.EntityA

/Entityb/get/ prints WebApplication11.Infrastructure.EntityB

  • Thanks, I had my convention as an attribute because that's the only thing I saw in the documentation. I registered a default the controller name convention on my generic so It wouldn't make a name like GenericController`EntityA by default. – johnny 5 Mar 15 '18 at 4:50
  • I believe just setting the controller name in the Convention should be sufficient, however the key is implicitly setting the route value of the controller so the routing middleware can direct the request appropriatly. Glad it works for you. – Nico Mar 15 '18 at 4:55

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