8

I am a C beginner and this is my C code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

main()
{
    printf("Hello, World!\n");
    return 'sss';
}

That will show an error. So how can I return a string in C code?

  • 6
    main must return an int, no ifs, ands, or buts. What exactly do you expect to happen to this string? (Though the "string" is really a character constant since it uses ' delimiters instead of ") – James McNellis Feb 8 '11 at 3:45
  • 1
    An error? Copy the error message exactly. What, precisely, did you expect to happen? – Josh Lee Feb 8 '11 at 3:49
  • 2
    There is a semicolon missing after the return statement; that is likely to be the error. Returning 'sss' from main will technically work (since it is an int), but it is definitely not what is desired. – Jeremiah Willcock Feb 8 '11 at 3:55
  • 1
    This question needs to be clarified, many answers here assume that you're asking about: "How do I return a string to the operating system in C?" – Arafangion Mar 15 '11 at 14:20
  • 2
    Possible duplicate of Returning C string from a function – Ashish Ahuja Mar 14 '16 at 10:45
12

If you are looking to return a string from a function (other than main), you should do something like this.

#include <stdio.h>

const char * getString();

int main()
{
    printf("Hello, World!\n");
    printf("%s\n", getString());
    return 0;
}

const char * getString()
{
    const char *x = "abcstring";
    return x;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Careful, string literals are const - but the compiler doesn't always know this! – Martin Beckett Feb 8 '11 at 4:38
  • @Martin Beckett, how about add const before the declaration? Such as const char *. – Thomson Feb 8 '11 at 4:49
  • @MartinBeckett, What do you mean by "but the compiler doesn't always know this"? – Pacerier May 12 '15 at 19:19
  • @Pacerier there are no rules (AFAIK) about what happens to the memory occupied by the string when that function exits. It may depending on your architecture be in read only program segment or in data memory. So even if it "works" don't rely on it. – Martin Beckett May 12 '15 at 21:34
  • @MartinBeckett, Are you saying that when we read the string (the line printf("%s\n", getString());), we may actually get rubbish data? – Pacerier May 24 '15 at 14:30
4

The magic is in the key word static which preserves the memory content of the string even after the function ends. (You can consider it like extending the scope of the variable.)

This code takes one character each time, then concatenates them in a string and saves it into a file:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>

char* strbsmallah ()
{
  static char input[50];
  char position = 0, letter;
  scanf("%c", &letter);
  while (letter != '~') { // Press '~' to end your text
    input[position] = letter;
    ++position;
    scanf("%c", &letter);
  }
  input[position] = '\0';
  char *y;
  y = (char*) &input;
  //printf("%s\n ", y);
  return y;
}

int main() {
  printf("\n");
  FILE *fp;
  fp = fopen("bsmallah.txt", "w+");
  fprintf(fp, strbsmallah());

  while (!_kbhit())
    ;

  return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • But it will overwrite memory if typing more than 50 characters(?). – Peter Mortensen Apr 30 at 13:51
  • What is _kbhit()? Is it specific to a particular platform (say, Windows)? – Peter Mortensen Apr 30 at 13:52
2

You could do this in a way similar to scanf. In other words:

void foo(char **value_to_return) {
    *value_to_return = malloc(256); // Store 256 characters
    strcpy(*value_to_return, "deposited string");
}

int main() {
    char *deposit;
    foo(&deposit);
    printf("%s", deposit);
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
1

You don't return a string. Applications exit with an integer exit code.

Conventionally, exiting with a return of 0 will always show that your application exited without error / completed. You return an integer other than 0 to show that your application exited abnormally.

You could throw an exception and handle it with a logging method higher in the call stack, or you could just return something other than 0 and make sure you had it documented in your release notes as to what each error integer means.

| improve this answer | |
1

Sadly there is no way to do that.

You could add something to the end of your C program like:

int main()
{
    int err = 0; // 0 is "success" is most C programs
    printf("Hello, World!!\n");

    switch( err )
    {
      case 0:
        printf("Program shutdown successfully!\n");
        break;
      case 1:
        printf("We had an issue somewhere. Please fix your input data\n");
        break;
      //case 2, 3, etc...
    };

   return err;
}
| improve this answer | |
-1

You might be able to use environment variables for that. Not sure though.

| improve this answer | |

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