4

Suppose I'm trying to create a collector that aggregates data into a resource that has to be closed after usage. Is there any way to implement something similar to a finally block in a Collector? In the successful case this could be done in the finisher method, but there does not seem to be any method invoked in case of exceptions.

The goal would be to implement an operation like the following in a clean way and without having to collect the stream into an in-memory list first.

stream.collect(groupingBy(this::extractFileName, collectToFile()));
  • 1
    so you're thinking of something like Collector#onError? If so, there is no such thing, you would have to do that yourself... – Eugene Mar 15 '18 at 10:55
  • 1
    @Eugene Yes, or maybe a way to cleanly attach an onClose method the the stream being collected. – Jörn Horstmann Mar 15 '18 at 10:57
  • @FedericoPeraltaSchaffner I'd like each group to be closed and the exception be propagated. In my example, the accumulator provided by Collector.supplier() could implement Closeable and should behave like it was invoked in a try-with-resources block. – Jörn Horstmann Mar 15 '18 at 14:18
  • @FedericoPeraltaSchaffner any checked exception would have to be wrapped into unchecked ones, like UncheckedIOException. But I think the question is more general than file io. Either on successful completion or any exception I'd like to close a resource. Looking at some more, I could probably wrap all the collector functions to do this, but there would still be the edge case of any exception inside the stream processing itself. I don't think there are any guarantees that these never throw. – Jörn Horstmann Mar 15 '18 at 18:11
  • @FedericoPeraltaSchaffner that is actually the very first idea in a comment I had (deleted it, since it seemed too dumb :| ). you could wrap every method from the collector indeed, but my doubt is that while some thread caught an exception and some other thread is/will plan to write to the same file. These threads need to communicate somehow, I thought the OP will provide details in how he wants to handle such cases – Eugene Mar 15 '18 at 20:11
1

The only way I think you could fulfil your requirement would be by means of a close handler supplied to the Stream.onClose method. Suppose you have the following class:

class CloseHandler implements Runnable {
    List<Runnable> children = new ArrayList<>();

    void add(Runnable ch) { children.add(ch); }

    @Override
    public void run() { children.forEach(Runnable::run); }
}

Now, you'd need to use your stream as follows:

CloseHandler closeAll = new CloseHandler();
try (Stream<Something> stream = list.stream().onClose(closeAll)) {
    // Now collect
    stream.collect(Collectors.groupingBy(
        this::extractFileName, 
        toFile(closeAll)));
}

This uses the try-with-resources construct, so that the stream is automatically closed either when consumed or if an error occurs. Note that we're passing the closeAll close handler to the Stream.onClose method.

Here's a sketch of your downstream collector, which will collect/write/send elements to the Closeable resource (note that we're also passing the closeAll close handler to it):

static Collector<Something, ?, Void> toFile(CloseHandler closeAll) {

    class Acc {

        SomeResource resource; // this is your closeable resource

        Acc() {
            try {
                resource = new SomeResource(...); // create closeable resource
                closeAll.add(this::close);        // this::close is a Runnable
            } catch (IOException e) {
                throw new UncheckedIOException(e);
            }
        }

        void add(Something elem) {
            try {
                // TODO write/send to closeable resource here
            } catch (IOException e) {
                throw new UncheckedIOException(e);
            }
        }

        Acc merge(Acc another) {
            // TODO left as an exercise
        }

        // This is the close handler for this particular closeable resource
        private void close() {
            try {
                // Here we close our closeable resource
                if (resource != null) resource.close();
            } catch (IOException ignored) {
            }
        }
    }
    return Collector.of(Acc::new, Acc::add, Acc::merge, a -> null);
}

So, this uses a local class (named Acc) to wrap the closeable resource, and declares methods to add an element of the stream to the closeable resource, and also to merge two Acc instances in case the stream is parallel (left as an exercise, in case it's worth the effort).

Collector.of is used to create a collector based on the Acc class' methods, with a finisher that returns null, as we don't want to put anything in the map created by Collectors.groupingBy.

Finally, there's the close method, which closes the wrapped closeable resource in case it has been created.

When the stream is implicitly closed by means of the try-with-resources construct, the CloseHandler.run method will be automatically executed, and this will in turn execute all the child close handlers previously added when each Acc instance was created.

| improve this answer | |
  • the merge is what mostly stopped me from posting something like this... Unless the OP comes with details about what exactly happens when a ThreadA throws an Exception (in the merge) and ThreadB wants to write to the same file, not even sure this is part of the requirement – Eugene Mar 16 '18 at 8:18
  • ... without having to collect the stream into an in-memory list first so it seems there is some IO/DB/JMS whatever. If the OP confirm I would gladly upvote btw – Eugene Mar 16 '18 at 12:30
  • Thanks, the combination of a mutable onClose callback, where each accumulator gets registered solves the problem quite nicely. I'm not concerned about parallel processing at the moment, whether a merge operation is possible (and faster than just sequential processing) depends too much on the resource. Actually a followup question would be whether sequential streams are guaranteed to never call the combiner method of a collector. – Jörn Horstmann Mar 16 '18 at 13:50
  • @JörnHorstmann that is guaranteed by the spec, check the Collector javadocs. – Federico Peralta Schaffner Mar 16 '18 at 14:09
0

Ok I have took a look on Collectors implementation, you need CollectorImpl to create custom collector but its not public. So I implement new one using its copy (last 2 method you might be interested in):

public class CollectorUtils<T, A, R> implements Collector<T, A, R> {

    static final Set<Collector.Characteristics> CH_ID = Collections
            .unmodifiableSet(EnumSet.of(Collector.Characteristics.IDENTITY_FINISH));

    private final Supplier<A> supplier;
    private final BiConsumer<A, T> accumulator;
    private final BinaryOperator<A> combiner;
    private final Function<A, R> finisher;
    private final Set<Characteristics> characteristics;

    CollectorUtils(Supplier<A> supplier, BiConsumer<A, T> accumulator, BinaryOperator<A> combiner,
            Function<A, R> finisher, Set<Characteristics> characteristics) {
        this.supplier = supplier;
        this.accumulator = accumulator;
        this.combiner = combiner;
        this.finisher = finisher;
        this.characteristics = characteristics;
    }

    CollectorUtils(Supplier<A> supplier, BiConsumer<A, T> accumulator, BinaryOperator<A> combiner,
            Set<Characteristics> characteristics) {
        this(supplier, accumulator, combiner, castingIdentity(), characteristics);
    }

    @Override
    public BiConsumer<A, T> accumulator() {
        return accumulator;
    }

    @Override
    public Supplier<A> supplier() {
        return supplier;
    }

    @Override
    public BinaryOperator<A> combiner() {
        return combiner;
    }

    @Override
    public Function<A, R> finisher() {
        return finisher;
    }

    @Override
    public Set<Characteristics> characteristics() {
        return characteristics;
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    private static <I, R> Function<I, R> castingIdentity() {
        return i -> (R) i;
    }

    public static <C extends Collection<File>> Collector<String, ?, C> toFile() {
        return new CollectorUtils<>((Supplier<List<File>>) ArrayList::new, (c, t) -> {
            c.add(toFile(t));
        }, (r1, r2) -> {
            r1.addAll(r2);
            return r1;
        }, CH_ID);
    }

    private static File toFile(String fileName) {
        try (Closeable type = () -> System.out.println("Complete! closing file " + fileName);) {
            // stuff
            System.out.println("Converting " + fileName);

            return new File(fileName);
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        throw new RuntimeException("Failed to create file");

    }

}

Then I call stream as below:

public static void main(String[] args) {
        Stream.of("x.txt", "y.txt","z.txt").collect(CollectorUtils.toFile());
    }

Output:

Convertingx.txt
closing filex.txt
Convertingy.txt
closing filey.txt
Convertingz.txt
closing filez.txt
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This differs in what I want to achieve, the goal would be to write the contents of the stream to different files, depending on some grouping key. And this requires the FileOutputStream to be closed at some point, even on exceptions. BTW, you can use Collector.of as a factory method instead of implementing the interface yourself. – Jörn Horstmann Mar 15 '18 at 12:09
  • @JörnHorstmann thanks Collector.of really cool didnt know that – HRgiger Mar 15 '18 at 12:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.