72

As we know if n is not a perfect square, then sqrt(n) would not be an integer. Since I need only the integer part, I feel that calling sqrt(n) wouldn't be that fast, as it takes time to calculate the fractional part also.

So my question is,

Can we get only the integer part of sqrt(n) without calculating the actual value of sqrt(n)? The algorithm should be faster than sqrt(n) (defined in <math.h> or <cmath>)?

If possible, you can write the code in asm block also.

8
  • 27
    Most CPUs perform sqrt in hardware, so it's unlikely that you'll be able to go faster by computing only the integer part.
    – Gabe
    Feb 8, 2011 at 6:44
  • Here is an interesting link for a more deterministic algorithm: embedded-systems.com/98/9802fe2.htm
    – leppie
    Feb 8, 2011 at 6:46
  • 3
    @Gabe: sqrt() in the C library is unlikely to be implemented directly as a hardware sqrt instruction on all machines, since the hardware might not handle all the corner cases required by IEEE 754. If you don't care, you might use inline asm or gcc's -ffast-math to get directly at the hardware. Feb 8, 2011 at 7:04
  • May be this link can help you.
    – Emil
    Feb 8, 2011 at 7:05
  • 13
    did you profile your application? Are you sure you need to improve the sqrt(n) speed? Feb 8, 2011 at 12:56

12 Answers 12

23

I would try the Fast Inverse Square Root trick.

It's a way to get a very good approximation of 1/sqrt(n) without any branch, based on some bit-twiddling so not portable (notably between 32-bits and 64-bits platforms).

Once you get it, you just need to inverse the result, and takes the integer part.

There might be faster tricks, of course, since this one is a bit of a round about.

EDIT: let's do it!

First a little helper:

// benchmark.h
#include <sys/time.h>

template <typename Func>
double benchmark(Func f, size_t iterations)
{
  f();

  timeval a, b;
  gettimeofday(&a, 0);
  for (; iterations --> 0;)
  {
    f();
  }
  gettimeofday(&b, 0);
  return (b.tv_sec * (unsigned int)1e6 + b.tv_usec) -
         (a.tv_sec * (unsigned int)1e6 + a.tv_usec);
}

Then the main body:

#include <iostream>

#include <cmath>

#include "benchmark.h"

class Sqrt
{
public:
  Sqrt(int n): _number(n) {}

  int operator()() const
  {
    double d = _number;
    return static_cast<int>(std::sqrt(d) + 0.5);
  }

private:
  int _number;
};

// http://www.codecodex.com/wiki/Calculate_an_integer_square_root
class IntSqrt
{
public:
  IntSqrt(int n): _number(n) {}

  int operator()() const 
  {
    int remainder = _number;
    if (remainder < 0) { return 0; }

    int place = 1 <<(sizeof(int)*8 -2);

    while (place > remainder) { place /= 4; }

    int root = 0;
    while (place)
    {
      if (remainder >= root + place)
      {
        remainder -= root + place;
        root += place*2;
      }
      root /= 2;
      place /= 4;
    }
    return root;
  }

private:
  int _number;
};

// http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_inverse_square_root
class FastSqrt
{
public:
  FastSqrt(int n): _number(n) {}

  int operator()() const
  {
    float number = _number;

    float x2 = number * 0.5F;
    float y = number;
    long i = *(long*)&y;
    //i = (long)0x5fe6ec85e7de30da - (i >> 1);
    i = 0x5f3759df - (i >> 1);
    y = *(float*)&i;

    y = y * (1.5F - (x2*y*y));
    y = y * (1.5F - (x2*y*y)); // let's be precise

    return static_cast<int>(1/y + 0.5f);
  }

private:
  int _number;
};


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  if (argc != 3) {
    std::cerr << "Usage: %prog integer iterations\n";
    return 1;
  }

  int n = atoi(argv[1]);
  int it = atoi(argv[2]);

  assert(Sqrt(n)() == IntSqrt(n)() &&
          Sqrt(n)() == FastSqrt(n)() && "Different Roots!");
  std::cout << "sqrt(" << n << ") = " << Sqrt(n)() << "\n";

  double time = benchmark(Sqrt(n), it);
  double intTime = benchmark(IntSqrt(n), it);
  double fastTime = benchmark(FastSqrt(n), it);

  std::cout << "Number iterations: " << it << "\n"
               "Sqrt computation : " << time << "\n"
               "Int computation  : " << intTime << "\n"
               "Fast computation : " << fastTime << "\n";

  return 0;
}

And the results:

sqrt(82) = 9
Number iterations: 4096
Sqrt computation : 56
Int computation  : 217
Fast computation : 119

// Note had to tweak the program here as Int here returns -1 :/
sqrt(2147483647) = 46341 // real answer sqrt(2 147 483 647) = 46 340.95
Number iterations: 4096
Sqrt computation : 57
Int computation  : 313
Fast computation : 119

Where as expected the Fast computation performs much better than the Int computation.

Oh, and by the way, sqrt is faster :)

8
  • This is for floating point but nawaz just needs integer values. Feb 8, 2011 at 7:32
  • @Saeed: an integer can be trivially converted to a float (back and forth) and I am curious about the applicability of this method. It certainly is the only branchless method without a pre-computed table that I could think of. After that... I guess we could benchmark :) ? Feb 8, 2011 at 7:36
  • Yes it can, but I think methods (like article I referenced) are faster (because they are just care about integer parts) but yes should benchmark this ways. Feb 8, 2011 at 7:52
  • @Saeed: done, as expected the Fast Inverse Trick performs better, being branchless pays off I guess Feb 8, 2011 at 8:44
  • @Saeed: normally you've got all the includes. I wonder what -ffast-math would give for sqrt. Feb 8, 2011 at 9:01
17

Edit: this answer is foolish - use (int) sqrt(i)

After profiling with proper settings (-march=native -m64 -O3) the above was a lot faster.


Alright, a bit old question, but the "fastest" answer has not been given yet. The fastest (I think) is the Binary Square Root algorithm, explained fully in this Embedded.com article.

It basicly comes down to this:

unsigned short isqrt(unsigned long a) {
    unsigned long rem = 0;
    int root = 0;
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < 16; i++) {
        root <<= 1;
        rem <<= 2;
        rem += a >> 30;
        a <<= 2;

        if (root < rem) {
            root++;
            rem -= root;
            root++;
        }
    }

    return (unsigned short) (root >> 1);
}

On my machine (Q6600, Ubuntu 10.10) I profiled by taking the square root of the numbers 1-100000000. Using iqsrt(i) took 2750 ms. Using (unsigned short) sqrt((float) i) took 3600ms. This was done using g++ -O3. Using the -ffast-math compile option the times were 2100ms and 3100ms respectively. Note this is without using even a single line of assembler so it could probably still be much faster.

The above code works for both C and C++ and with minor syntax changes also for Java.

What works even better for a limited range is a binary search. On my machine this blows the version above out of the water by a factor 4. Sadly it's very limited in range:

#include <stdint.h>

const uint16_t squares[] = {
    0, 1, 4, 9,
    16, 25, 36, 49,
    64, 81, 100, 121,
    144, 169, 196, 225,
    256, 289, 324, 361,
    400, 441, 484, 529,
    576, 625, 676, 729,
    784, 841, 900, 961,
    1024, 1089, 1156, 1225,
    1296, 1369, 1444, 1521,
    1600, 1681, 1764, 1849,
    1936, 2025, 2116, 2209,
    2304, 2401, 2500, 2601,
    2704, 2809, 2916, 3025,
    3136, 3249, 3364, 3481,
    3600, 3721, 3844, 3969,
    4096, 4225, 4356, 4489,
    4624, 4761, 4900, 5041,
    5184, 5329, 5476, 5625,
    5776, 5929, 6084, 6241,
    6400, 6561, 6724, 6889,
    7056, 7225, 7396, 7569,
    7744, 7921, 8100, 8281,
    8464, 8649, 8836, 9025,
    9216, 9409, 9604, 9801,
    10000, 10201, 10404, 10609,
    10816, 11025, 11236, 11449,
    11664, 11881, 12100, 12321,
    12544, 12769, 12996, 13225,
    13456, 13689, 13924, 14161,
    14400, 14641, 14884, 15129,
    15376, 15625, 15876, 16129,
    16384, 16641, 16900, 17161,
    17424, 17689, 17956, 18225,
    18496, 18769, 19044, 19321,
    19600, 19881, 20164, 20449,
    20736, 21025, 21316, 21609,
    21904, 22201, 22500, 22801,
    23104, 23409, 23716, 24025,
    24336, 24649, 24964, 25281,
    25600, 25921, 26244, 26569,
    26896, 27225, 27556, 27889,
    28224, 28561, 28900, 29241,
    29584, 29929, 30276, 30625,
    30976, 31329, 31684, 32041,
    32400, 32761, 33124, 33489,
    33856, 34225, 34596, 34969,
    35344, 35721, 36100, 36481,
    36864, 37249, 37636, 38025,
    38416, 38809, 39204, 39601,
    40000, 40401, 40804, 41209,
    41616, 42025, 42436, 42849,
    43264, 43681, 44100, 44521,
    44944, 45369, 45796, 46225,
    46656, 47089, 47524, 47961,
    48400, 48841, 49284, 49729,
    50176, 50625, 51076, 51529,
    51984, 52441, 52900, 53361,
    53824, 54289, 54756, 55225,
    55696, 56169, 56644, 57121,
    57600, 58081, 58564, 59049,
    59536, 60025, 60516, 61009,
    61504, 62001, 62500, 63001,
    63504, 64009, 64516, 65025
};

inline int isqrt(uint16_t x) {
    const uint16_t *p = squares;

    if (p[128] <= x) p += 128;
    if (p[ 64] <= x) p +=  64;
    if (p[ 32] <= x) p +=  32;
    if (p[ 16] <= x) p +=  16;
    if (p[  8] <= x) p +=   8;
    if (p[  4] <= x) p +=   4;
    if (p[  2] <= x) p +=   2;
    if (p[  1] <= x) p +=   1;

    return p - squares;
}

A 32 bit version can be downloaded here: https://gist.github.com/3481770

7
  • Try my branchless variant and see if it's faster. Aug 26, 2012 at 17:02
  • @R.: nope, it's slower by around a factor 3.
    – orlp
    Aug 26, 2012 at 17:10
  • Is your compiler perhaps using cmov for your version? Aug 26, 2012 at 17:10
  • You might also try this simplified version with (implementation-defined) signed right-shift: for (s=squares, i=128; i; i=i>>1) s += s[i]-x-1>>31 & i; return s-squares; Aug 26, 2012 at 17:13
  • 1
    @R.: nope it doesn't use cmov. Also, hand unrolling the loop actually is faster by around 20%. Here is the asm output for both versions (note that I made the 32 bit version): gist.github.com/3481749 The full 32 bit version can be downloaded here: gist.github.com/3481770
    – orlp
    Aug 26, 2012 at 17:19
6

If you don't mind an approximation, how about this integer sqrt function I cobbled together.

int sqrti(int x)
{
    union { float f; int x; } v; 

    // convert to float
    v.f = (float)x;

    // fast aprox sqrt
    //  assumes float is in IEEE 754 single precision format 
    //  assumes int is 32 bits
    //  b = exponent bias
    //  m = number of mantissa bits
    v.x  -= 1 << 23; // subtract 2^m 
    v.x >>= 1;       // divide by 2
    v.x  += 1 << 29; // add ((b + 1) / 2) * 2^m

    // convert to int
    return (int)v.f;
}

It uses the algorithm described in this Wikipedia article. On my machine it's almost twice as fast as sqrt :)

2
  • 4
    Technically this breaks the strict aliasing rule. It doesn't seem to cause a problem under recent gcc (4.9), but the compliant way of doing it would be union { float f; int32_t x } v; v.f = (float) x; v.x -= ... return (int)((float)v.x);. Apr 22, 2015 at 19:35
  • 1
    Not bad it serves me to learn something, but how do you people measure speed? all the sqrt(int) functions I found on www are slower than std::sqrt. acording to my measuerments. your function is 27% slower and 3% less accurate btw. than std Sep 27, 2019 at 18:05
5

While I suspect you can find a plenty of options by searching for "fast integer square root", here are some potentially-new ideas that might work well (each independent, or maybe you can combine them):

  1. Make a static const array of all the perfect squares in the domain you want to support, and perform a fast branchless binary search on it. The resulting index in the array is the square root.
  2. Convert the number to floating point and break it into mantissa and exponent. Halve the exponent and multiply the mantissa by some magic factor (your job to find it). This should be able to give you a very close approximation. Include a final step to adjust it if it's not exact (or use it as a starting point for the binary search above).
14
  • 2
    If you want to square the 'index' at every step of your binary search, be my guest. It will be slooooooow. That's why I suggested precalculating them. Note that I said static const. There is no cost to computing it because it happened before your program was compiled. And even if you support the full range of 32-bit integers, your table will only be 256kb. Feb 8, 2011 at 6:56
  • 2
    I have used strategy 1 in a high performance context and it worked beautifully. I further enhanced the performance of the search using the knowledge that the next sqrt to be taken was likely to be close to the previous one (the context was graphical) ad it made a staggering performance difference.
    – Elemental
    Feb 8, 2011 at 7:11
  • 2
    @R.. : I don't think (1) will be faster than sqrt; binary searching on a list of 999999 integers would most likely to be slow than sqrt!
    – Nawaz
    Feb 8, 2011 at 7:18
  • 2
    @Nawaz: given you apparently care enough to ask the question, how about benchmarking it before condemning it. Much will depend on your exact hardware.... Feb 8, 2011 at 7:35
  • 3
    @Nawaz and R: I actually implemented it much better now. It's not branchless but it blows everything else so far out of the water: gist.github.com/3481607
    – orlp
    Aug 26, 2012 at 16:52
4

To do integer sqrt you can use this specialization of newtons method:

Def isqrt(N):

    a = 1
    b = N

    while |a-b| > 1
        b = N / a
        a = (a + b) / 2

    return a

Basically for any x the sqrt lies in the range (x ... N/x), so we just bisect that interval at every loop for the new guess. Sort of like binary search but it converges must faster.

This converges in O(loglog(N)) which is very fast. It also doesn't use floating point at all, and it will also work well for arbitrary precision integers.

3
  • 2
    I tried that one on iPhone hardware, but it seemed to be slow because of the 'b = N / a' operation. Aug 1, 2013 at 17:19
  • 2
    @AndrewTomazos — Unfortunately, your function fails to return the correct answer for N ∈ { 0, 3, 8, 48, 63, 120, 143, ... }. Jul 18, 2015 at 7:19
  • This is only useful if integer division is much more efficient than FP sqrt. Or maybe if you need to handle integers that are too large to have exact float representations. Modern x86 hardware (Intel Haswell) can convert to float and back, and do a double-precision FP sqrt, in about 25 clock cycles latency. A single 32bit integer division has 22 to 29 cycles latency. Integer Newton iterations don't do well from a throughput perspective, either. Dec 26, 2015 at 22:42
4

This is so short that it 99% inlines:

static inline int sqrtn(int num) {
    int i = 0;
    __asm__ (
        "pxor %%xmm0, %%xmm0\n\t"   // clean xmm0 for cvtsi2ss
        "cvtsi2ss %1, %%xmm0\n\t"   // convert num to float, put it to xmm0
        "sqrtss %%xmm0, %%xmm0\n\t" // square root xmm0
        "cvttss2si %%xmm0, %0"      // float to int
        :"=r"(i):"r"(num):"%xmm0"); // i: result, num: input, xmm0: scratch register
    return i;
}

Why clean xmm0? Documentation of cvtsi2ss

The destination operand is an XMM register. The result is stored in the low doubleword of the destination operand, and the upper three doublewords are left unchanged.

GCC Intrinsic version (runs only on GCC):

#include <xmmintrin.h>
int sqrtn2(int num) {
    register __v4sf xmm0 = {0, 0, 0, 0};
    xmm0 = __builtin_ia32_cvtsi2ss(xmm0, num);
    xmm0 = __builtin_ia32_sqrtss(xmm0);
    return __builtin_ia32_cvttss2si(xmm0);
}

Intel Intrinsic version (tested on GCC, Clang, ICC):

#include <xmmintrin.h>
int sqrtn2(int num) {
    register __m128 xmm0 = _mm_setzero_ps();
    xmm0 = _mm_cvt_si2ss(xmm0, num);
    xmm0 = _mm_sqrt_ss(xmm0);
    return _mm_cvtt_ss2si(xmm0);
}

^^^^ All of them require SSE 1 (not even SSE 2).

Note: This is exactly how GCC calculates (int) sqrt((float) num) with -Ofast. If you want higher accuracy for larger i, then we can calculate (int) sqrt((double) num) (as noted by Gumby The Green in the comments):

static inline int sqrtn(int num) {
    int i = 0;
    __asm__ (
        "pxor %%xmm0, %%xmm0\n\t"
        "cvtsi2sd %1, %%xmm0\n\t"
        "sqrtsd %%xmm0, %%xmm0\n\t"
        "cvttsd2si %%xmm0, %0"
        :"=r"(i):"r"(num):"%xmm0");
    return i;
}

or

#include <xmmintrin.h>
int sqrtn2(int num) {
    register __v2df xmm0 = {0, 0};
    xmm0 = __builtin_ia32_cvtsi2sd(xmm0, num);
    xmm0 = __builtin_ia32_sqrtsd(xmm0);
    return __builtin_ia32_cvttsd2si(xmm0);
}
4
  • Do you really need to zero xmm0 before you copy a value into it? Also, inlining can disable optimization for surrounding code. What about using builtins (ie __builtin_ia32_cvtsi2ss, __builtin_ia32_sqrtss __builtin_ia32_cvtss2si) from here? When in comes to using inline asm, less is more. Jun 29, 2018 at 20:03
  • 1
    The Intel Intrinsic version doesn't round down - it rounds to the nearest int. To fix this, add a t to its last line: return _mm_cvtt_ss2si(xmm0);. These are 5-6x faster than sqrt() on my machine) but wrong answers start appearing when num >= 16,785,407 due to rounding errors on the float. To fix this in the GCC Intrinsic version, change the first line to __v2df xmm0 = {0, 0}; and replace each ss with sd (warning: cuts the speed in half). I don't see a _mm_cvt_si2sd() in Intel's Intrinsics Guide for some reason. May 10, 2019 at 2:24
  • Are you sure that cvtsi2ss %1 is actually safe? Assuming %1 is edi, then there could be some bits in upper part of rdi. Maybe you wouldn't notice it in your own tests, but it could happen in principle. Aug 17, 2020 at 18:52
  • @J.Schultke Good catch I'll initialize i
    – MCCCS
    Aug 17, 2020 at 19:48
3

In many cases, even exact integer sqrt value is not needed, enough having good approximation of it. (For example, it often happens in DSP optimization, when 32-bit signal should be compressed to 16-bit, or 16-bit to 8-bit, without loosing much precision around zero).

I've found this useful equation:

k = ceil(MSB(n)/2); - MSB(n) is the most significant bit of "n"


sqrt(n) ~= 2^(k-2)+(2^(k-1))*n/(2^(2*k))); - all multiplications and divisions here are very DSP-friendly, as they are only 2^k.

This equation generates smooth curve (n, sqrt(n)), its values are not very much different from real sqrt(n) and thus can be useful when approximate accuracy is enough.

1
  • Thanks for sharing. This is very useful on μcontrollers that do not have a floating point unit.
    – Bram
    Apr 19 at 5:09
3

The following solution computes the integer part, meaning floor(sqrt(x)) exactly, with no rounding errors.

Problems With Other Approaches

  • using float or double is neither portable nor precise enough
  • @orlp's isqrt gives insane results like isqrt(100) = 15
  • approaches based on huge lookup tables are not practical beyond 32 bits
  • using a fast inverse sqrt is very imprecise, you're better off using sqrtf
  • Newton's approach requires expensive integer division and a good initial guess

My Approach

Mine is based on the bit-guessing approach proposed on Wikipedia. Unfortunately the pseudo-code provided on Wikipedia has some errors so I had to make some adjustments:

// C++20 also provides std::bit_width in its <bit> header
unsigned char bit_width(unsigned long long x) {
    return x == 0 ? 1 : 64 - __builtin_clzll(x);
}

template <typename Int, std::enable_if_t<std::is_unsigned<Int, int = 0>>
Int sqrt(const Int n) {
    unsigned char shift = bit_width(n);
    shift += shift & 1; // round up to next multiple of 2

    Int result = 0;

    do {
        shift -= 2;
        result <<= 1; // make space for the next guessed bit
        result |= 1;  // guess that the next bit is 1
        result ^= result * result > (n >> shift); // revert if guess too high
    } while (shift != 0);

    return result;
}

bit_width can be evaluated in constant time and the loop will iterate at most ceil(bit_width / 2) times. So even for a 64-bit integer, this will be at worst 32 iterations of basic arithmetic and bitwise operations.

The compile output is only around 20 instructions.

Performance

I have benchmarked my methods against float-bases ones by generating inputs uniformly. Note that in the real world most inputs would be much closer to zero than to std::numeric_limits<...>::max().

  • for uint32_t this performs about 25x worse than using std::sqrt(float)
  • for uint64_t this performs about 30x worse than using std::sqrt(double)

Accuracy

This method is always perfectly accurate, unlike approaches using floating point math.

  • Using sqrtf can provide incorrect rounding in the [228, 232) range. For example, sqrtf(0xffffffff) = 65536, when the square root is actually 65535.99999.
  • Double precision doesn't work consistently for the [260, 264) range. For example, sqrt(0x3fff...) = 2147483648, when the square root is actually 2147483647.999999.

The only thing that covers all 64-bit integers is x86 extended precision long double, simply because it can fit an entire 64-bit integer.

Conclusion

As I said, this the only solution that handles all inputs correctly, avoids integer division and doesn't require lookup tables. In summary, if you need a method that is independent of precision and doesn't require gigantic lookup tables, this is your only option. It might be especially useful in a constexpr context where performance isn't critical and where it could be much more important to get a 100% accurate result.

Alternative Approach Using Newton's Method

Newton's method can be quite fast when starting with a good guess. For our guess, we will round down to the next power of 2 and compute the square root in constant time. For any number 2x, we can obtain the square root using 2x/2.

template <typename Int, std::enable_if_t<std::is_unsigned_v<Int>, int> = 0>
Int sqrt_guess(const Int n)
{
    Int log2floor = bit_width(n) - 1;
    // sqrt(x) is equivalent to pow(2, x / 2 = x >> 1)
    // pow(2, x) is equivalent to 1 << x
    return 1 << (log2floor >> 1);
}

Note that this is not exactly 2x/2 because we lost some precision during the rightshift. Instead it is 2floor(x/2). Also note that sqrt_guess(0) = 1 which is actually necessary to avoid division by zero in the first iteration:

template <typename Int, std::enable_if_t<std::is_unsigned_v<Int>, int> = 0>
Int sqrt_newton(const Int n)
{
    Int a = sqrt_guess(n);
    Int b = n;
    
    // compute unsigned difference
    while (std::max(a, b) - std::min(a, b) > 1) {
        b = n / a;
        a = (a + b) / 2;
    }

    // a is now either floor(sqrt(n)) or ceil(sqrt(n))
    // we decrement in the latter case
    // this is overflow-safe as long as we start with a lower bound guess
    return a - (a * a > n);
}

This alternative approach performs roughly equivalent to the first proposal, but is usually a few percentage points faster. However, it heavily relies on efficient hardware division and result can vary heavily.

The use of sqrt_guess makes a huge difference. It is roughly five times faster than using 1 as the initial guess.

2

Why nobody suggests the quickest method?

If:

  1. the range of numbers is limited
  2. memory consumption is not crucial
  3. application launch time is not critical

then create int[MAX_X] filled (on launch) with sqrt(x) (you don't need to use the function sqrt() for it).

All these conditions fit my program quite well. Particularly, an int[10000000] array is going to consume 40MB.

What's your thoughts on this?

1
  • 10
    The array is too large, a cache miss may be more expensive than the sqrt calculation.
    – Ricbit
    Nov 18, 2012 at 21:28
1

On my computer with gcc, with -ffast-math, converting a 32-bit integer to float and using sqrtf takes 1.2 s per 10^9 ops (without -ffast-math it takes 3.54 s).

The following algorithm uses 0.87 s per 10^9 at the expense of some accuracy: errors can be as much as -7 or +1 although the RMS error is only 0.79:

uint16_t SQRTTAB[65536];

inline uint16_t approxsqrt(uint32_t x) { 
  const uint32_t m1 = 0xff000000;
  const uint32_t m2 = 0x00ff0000;
  if (x&m1) {
    return SQRTTAB[x>>16];
  } else if (x&m2) {
    return SQRTTAB[x>>8]>>4;
  } else {
    return SQRTTAB[x]>>8;
  }
}

The table is constructed using:

void maketable() {
  for (int x=0; x<65536; x++) {
    double v = x/65535.0;
    v = sqrt(v);
    int y = int(v*65535.0+0.999);
    SQRTTAB[x] = y;
  }
}

I found that refining the bisection using further if statements does improve accuracy, but it also slows things down to the point that sqrtf is faster, at least with -ffast-math.

1
  • Two-stage tables might perform well here as well.
    – rsaxvc
    Jul 7, 2017 at 22:06
1

Or just do a binary search, cant write a simpler version imo:

uint16_t sqrti(uint32_t num)
{
    uint16_t ret = 0;
    for(int32_t i = 15; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        uint16_t temp = ret | (1 << i);
        if(temp * temp <= num)
        {
            ret = temp;
        }
    }
    return ret;
}
0

If you need performance on computing square root, I guess you will compute a lot of them. Then why not caching the answer? I don't know the range for N in your case, nor if you will compute many times the square root of the same integer, but if yes, then you can cache the result each time your method is called (in an array would be the most efficient if not too large).

0

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