108

I need to convert one into 1, two into 2 and so on.

Is there a way to do this with a library or a class or anything?

5

19 Answers 19

142

The majority of this code is to set up the numwords dict, which is only done on the first call.

def text2int(textnum, numwords={}):
    if not numwords:
      units = [
        "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight",
        "nine", "ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen",
        "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen",
      ]

      tens = ["", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety"]

      scales = ["hundred", "thousand", "million", "billion", "trillion"]

      numwords["and"] = (1, 0)
      for idx, word in enumerate(units):    numwords[word] = (1, idx)
      for idx, word in enumerate(tens):     numwords[word] = (1, idx * 10)
      for idx, word in enumerate(scales):   numwords[word] = (10 ** (idx * 3 or 2), 0)

    current = result = 0
    for word in textnum.split():
        if word not in numwords:
          raise Exception("Illegal word: " + word)

        scale, increment = numwords[word]
        current = current * scale + increment
        if scale > 100:
            result += current
            current = 0

    return result + current

print text2int("seven billion one hundred million thirty one thousand three hundred thirty seven")
#7100031337
9
  • 1
    FYI, this won't work with dates. Try: print text2int("nineteen ninety six") # 115
    – Nick Ruiz
    Commented May 13, 2014 at 14:26
  • 28
    The correct way of writing 1996 as a number in words is "one thousand nine hundred ninety six". If you want to support years, you'll need different code.
    – recursive
    Commented May 13, 2014 at 15:08
  • There's a ruby gem by Marc Burns that does it. I recently forked it to add support for years. You can call ruby code from python.
    – dimid
    Commented Mar 5, 2015 at 20:14
  • 1
    It breaks for 'hundred and six' try . print(text2int("hundred and six")) .. also print(text2int("thousand")) Commented Feb 26, 2017 at 8:43
  • 2
    "which one would expect". I suppose different users have different expectations. Personally, mine is that it wouldn't be called with that input, since it's not valid number. It's two.
    – recursive
    Commented Oct 23, 2019 at 20:33
44

I have just released a python module to PyPI called word2number for the exact purpose. https://github.com/akshaynagpal/w2n

Install it using:

pip install word2number

make sure your pip is updated to the latest version.

Usage:

from word2number import w2n

print w2n.word_to_num("two million three thousand nine hundred and eighty four")
2003984
5
  • 2
    Tried your package. Would suggest handling strings like: "1 million" or "1M". w2n.word_to_num("1 million") throws an error.
    – Ray
    Commented May 4, 2016 at 19:50
  • 1
    @Ray Thanks for trying it out. Can you please raise an issue at github.com/akshaynagpal/w2n/issues . You can also contribute if you want to. Else, I will definitely look at this issue in the next release. Thanks again! Commented May 4, 2016 at 20:33
  • 16
    Robert, Open source software is all about people improving it collaboratively. I wanted a library, and saw people wanted one too. So made it. It may not be ready for production level systems or conform to the textbook buzzwords. But, it works for the purpose. Also, it would be great if you could submit a PR so that it can be improved further for all users. Commented Aug 7, 2016 at 6:27
  • does it do calculations ? Say: nineteen % fifty-seven ? or any other operator i.e. +, 6, * and /
    – S.Jackson
    Commented Nov 5, 2020 at 9:28
  • 1
    It does not as of now @S.Jackson . Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 0:58
19

I needed something a bit different since my input is from a speech-to-text conversion and the solution is not always to sum the numbers. For example, "my zipcode is one two three four five" should not convert to "my zipcode is 15".

I took Andrew's answer and tweaked it to handle a few other cases people highlighted as errors, and also added support for examples like the zipcode one I mentioned above. Some basic test cases are shown below, but I'm sure there is still room for improvement.

def is_number(x):
    if type(x) == str:
        x = x.replace(',', '')
    try:
        float(x)
    except:
        return False
    return True

def text2int (textnum, numwords={}):
    units = [
        'zero', 'one', 'two', 'three', 'four', 'five', 'six', 'seven', 'eight',
        'nine', 'ten', 'eleven', 'twelve', 'thirteen', 'fourteen', 'fifteen',
        'sixteen', 'seventeen', 'eighteen', 'nineteen',
    ]
    tens = ['', '', 'twenty', 'thirty', 'forty', 'fifty', 'sixty', 'seventy', 'eighty', 'ninety']
    scales = ['hundred', 'thousand', 'million', 'billion', 'trillion']
    ordinal_words = {'first':1, 'second':2, 'third':3, 'fifth':5, 'eighth':8, 'ninth':9, 'twelfth':12}
    ordinal_endings = [('ieth', 'y'), ('th', '')]

    if not numwords:
        numwords['and'] = (1, 0)
        for idx, word in enumerate(units): numwords[word] = (1, idx)
        for idx, word in enumerate(tens): numwords[word] = (1, idx * 10)
        for idx, word in enumerate(scales): numwords[word] = (10 ** (idx * 3 or 2), 0)

    textnum = textnum.replace('-', ' ')

    current = result = 0
    curstring = ''
    onnumber = False
    lastunit = False
    lastscale = False

    def is_numword(x):
        if is_number(x):
            return True
        if word in numwords:
            return True
        return False

    def from_numword(x):
        if is_number(x):
            scale = 0
            increment = int(x.replace(',', ''))
            return scale, increment
        return numwords[x]

    for word in textnum.split():
        if word in ordinal_words:
            scale, increment = (1, ordinal_words[word])
            current = current * scale + increment
            if scale > 100:
                result += current
                current = 0
            onnumber = True
            lastunit = False
            lastscale = False
        else:
            for ending, replacement in ordinal_endings:
                if word.endswith(ending):
                    word = "%s%s" % (word[:-len(ending)], replacement)

            if (not is_numword(word)) or (word == 'and' and not lastscale):
                if onnumber:
                    # Flush the current number we are building
                    curstring += repr(result + current) + " "
                curstring += word + " "
                result = current = 0
                onnumber = False
                lastunit = False
                lastscale = False
            else:
                scale, increment = from_numword(word)
                onnumber = True

                if lastunit and (word not in scales):                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
                    # Assume this is part of a string of individual numbers to                                                                                                                                                                                                                
                    # be flushed, such as a zipcode "one two three four five"                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
                    curstring += repr(result + current)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
                    result = current = 0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

                if scale > 1:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
                    current = max(1, current)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

                current = current * scale + increment                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
                if scale > 100:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
                    result += current                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
                    current = 0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

                lastscale = False                                                                                                                                                                                                              
                lastunit = False                                                                                                                                                
                if word in scales:                                                                                                                                                                                                             
                    lastscale = True                                                                                                                                                                                                         
                elif word in units:                                                                                                                                                                                                             
                    lastunit = True

    if onnumber:
        curstring += repr(result + current)

    return curstring

Some tests...

one two three -> 123
three forty five -> 345
three and forty five -> 3 and 45
three hundred and forty five -> 345
three hundred -> 300
twenty five hundred -> 2500
three thousand and six -> 3006
three thousand six -> 3006
nineteenth -> 19
twentieth -> 20
first -> 1
my zip is one two three four five -> my zip is 12345
nineteen ninety six -> 1996
fifty-seventh -> 57
one million -> 1000000
first hundred -> 100
I will buy the first thousand -> I will buy the 1000  # probably should leave ordinal in the string
thousand -> 1000
hundred and six -> 106
1 million -> 1000000
3
  • 2
    I took your answer and fixed some bugs. Added support for "twenty ten" -> 2010 and all tens in general. You can find it here: github.com/careless25/text2digits
    – stackErr
    Commented Mar 31, 2019 at 2:51
  • does it do calculations ? Say: nineteen % fifty-seven ? or any other operator i.e. +, 6, * and /
    – S.Jackson
    Commented Nov 5, 2020 at 9:29
  • @S.Jackson it does not do calculations. If your text snippet is a valid equation in python I suppose you could use this to first do the conversion to integers, and then eval the result (assuming you are familiar and comfortable with the security concerns of that). So "ten + five" becomes "10 + 5", then eval("10 + 5") gives you 15. This would only handle the simplest of cases though. No floats, parenthesis to control order, support for saying plus/minus/etc in speech-to-text.
    – totalhack
    Commented Jan 12, 2021 at 14:47
17

If anyone is interested, I hacked up a version that maintains the rest of the string (though it may have bugs, haven't tested it too much).

def text2int (textnum, numwords={}):
    if not numwords:
        units = [
        "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight",
        "nine", "ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen",
        "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen",
        ]

        tens = ["", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety"]

        scales = ["hundred", "thousand", "million", "billion", "trillion"]

        numwords["and"] = (1, 0)
        for idx, word in enumerate(units):  numwords[word] = (1, idx)
        for idx, word in enumerate(tens):       numwords[word] = (1, idx * 10)
        for idx, word in enumerate(scales): numwords[word] = (10 ** (idx * 3 or 2), 0)

    ordinal_words = {'first':1, 'second':2, 'third':3, 'fifth':5, 'eighth':8, 'ninth':9, 'twelfth':12}
    ordinal_endings = [('ieth', 'y'), ('th', '')]

    textnum = textnum.replace('-', ' ')

    current = result = 0
    curstring = ""
    onnumber = False
    for word in textnum.split():
        if word in ordinal_words:
            scale, increment = (1, ordinal_words[word])
            current = current * scale + increment
            if scale > 100:
                result += current
                current = 0
            onnumber = True
        else:
            for ending, replacement in ordinal_endings:
                if word.endswith(ending):
                    word = "%s%s" % (word[:-len(ending)], replacement)

            if word not in numwords:
                if onnumber:
                    curstring += repr(result + current) + " "
                curstring += word + " "
                result = current = 0
                onnumber = False
            else:
                scale, increment = numwords[word]

                current = current * scale + increment
                if scale > 100:
                    result += current
                    current = 0
                onnumber = True

    if onnumber:
        curstring += repr(result + current)

    return curstring

Example:

 >>> text2int("I want fifty five hot dogs for two hundred dollars.")
 I want 55 hot dogs for 200 dollars.

There could be issues if you have, say, "$200". But, this was really rough.

1
12

I needed to handle a couple extra parsing cases, such as ordinal words ("first", "second"), hyphenated words ("one-hundred"), and hyphenated ordinal words like ("fifty-seventh"), so I added a couple lines:

def text2int(textnum, numwords={}):
    if not numwords:
        units = [
        "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight",
        "nine", "ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen",
        "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen",
        ]

        tens = ["", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety"]

        scales = ["hundred", "thousand", "million", "billion", "trillion"]

        numwords["and"] = (1, 0)
        for idx, word in enumerate(units):  numwords[word] = (1, idx)
        for idx, word in enumerate(tens):       numwords[word] = (1, idx * 10)
        for idx, word in enumerate(scales): numwords[word] = (10 ** (idx * 3 or 2), 0)

    ordinal_words = {'first':1, 'second':2, 'third':3, 'fifth':5, 'eighth':8, 'ninth':9, 'twelfth':12}
    ordinal_endings = [('ieth', 'y'), ('th', '')]

    textnum = textnum.replace('-', ' ')

    current = result = 0
    for word in textnum.split():
        if word in ordinal_words:
            scale, increment = (1, ordinal_words[word])
        else:
            for ending, replacement in ordinal_endings:
                if word.endswith(ending):
                    word = "%s%s" % (word[:-len(ending)], replacement)

            if word not in numwords:
                raise Exception("Illegal word: " + word)

            scale, increment = numwords[word]
        
         current = current * scale + increment
         if scale > 100:
            result += current
            current = 0

    return result + current`
2
  • 2
    Note: This returns zero for hundredth, thousandth etc. Use one hundredth to get 100!
    – rohithpr
    Commented Mar 26, 2016 at 18:50
  • 1
    mutable default argument is antipattern
    – Neil
    Commented Sep 6, 2021 at 13:27
6

Here's the trivial case approach:

>>> number = {'one':1,
...           'two':2,
...           'three':3,}
>>> 
>>> number['two']
2

Or are you looking for something that can handle "twelve thousand, one hundred seventy-two"?

1
  • 1
    This helped me, thanks. Useful answer when the text is coming encoded from something like a questionnaire with only a limited number of textual number options. Commented Mar 6, 2023 at 21:25
6
def parse_int(string):
    ONES = {'zero': 0,
            'one': 1,
            'two': 2,
            'three': 3,
            'four': 4,
            'five': 5,
            'six': 6,
            'seven': 7,
            'eight': 8,
            'nine': 9,
            'ten': 10,
            'eleven': 11,
            'twelve': 12,
            'thirteen': 13,
            'fourteen': 14,
            'fifteen': 15,
            'sixteen': 16,
            'seventeen': 17,
            'eighteen': 18,
            'nineteen': 19,
            'twenty': 20,
            'thirty': 30,
            'forty': 40,
            'fifty': 50,
            'sixty': 60,
            'seventy': 70,
            'eighty': 80,
            'ninety': 90,
              }

    numbers = []
    for token in string.replace('-', ' ').split(' '):
        if token in ONES:
            numbers.append(ONES[token])
        elif token == 'hundred':
            numbers[-1] *= 100
        elif token == 'thousand':
            numbers = [x * 1000 for x in numbers]
        elif token == 'million':
            numbers = [x * 1000000 for x in numbers]
    return sum(numbers)

Tested with 700 random numbers in range 1 to million works well.

1
  • This does not work for numbers in the hundreds-of-millions.
    – Eric
    Commented Mar 13, 2022 at 18:40
4

Make use of the Python package: WordToDigits

pip install wordtodigits

It can find numbers present in word form in a sentence and then convert them to the proper numeric format. Also takes care of the decimal part, if present. The word representation of numbers could be anywhere in the passage.

3

This could be easily be hardcoded into a dictionary if there's a limited amount of numbers you'd like to parse.

For slightly more complex cases, you'll probably want to generate this dictionary automatically, based on the relatively simple numbers grammar. Something along the lines of this (of course, generalized...)

for i in range(10):
   myDict[30 + i] = "thirty-" + singleDigitsDict[i]

If you need something more extensive, then it looks like you'll need natural language processing tools. This article might be a good starting point.

3

I was looking for a library that will help me support all above and more edge case scenarios like ordinal numbers(first, second), bigger numbers , operators, etc and I found this numwords-to-nums

You can install via

pip install numwords_to_nums

Here's a basic example

from numwords_to_nums.numwords_to_nums import NumWordsToNum
num = NumWordsToNum()
   
result = num.numerical_words_to_numbers("twenty ten and twenty one")
print(result)  # Output: 2010 and 21
   
eval_result = num.evaluate('Hey calculate 2+5')
print(eval_result) # Output: 7

result = num.numerical_words_to_numbers('first')
print(result) # Output: 1st
1

Made change so that text2int(scale) will return correct conversion. Eg, text2int("hundred") => 100.

import re

numwords = {}


def text2int(textnum):

    if not numwords:

        units = [ "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six",
                "seven", "eight", "nine", "ten", "eleven", "twelve",
                "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen", "sixteen", "seventeen",
                "eighteen", "nineteen"]

        tens = ["", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", 
                "seventy", "eighty", "ninety"]

        scales = ["hundred", "thousand", "million", "billion", "trillion", 
                'quadrillion', 'quintillion', 'sexillion', 'septillion', 
                'octillion', 'nonillion', 'decillion' ]

        numwords["and"] = (1, 0)
        for idx, word in enumerate(units): numwords[word] = (1, idx)
        for idx, word in enumerate(tens): numwords[word] = (1, idx * 10)
        for idx, word in enumerate(scales): numwords[word] = (10 ** (idx * 3 or 2), 0)

    ordinal_words = {'first':1, 'second':2, 'third':3, 'fifth':5, 
            'eighth':8, 'ninth':9, 'twelfth':12}
    ordinal_endings = [('ieth', 'y'), ('th', '')]
    current = result = 0
    tokens = re.split(r"[\s-]+", textnum)
    for word in tokens:
        if word in ordinal_words:
            scale, increment = (1, ordinal_words[word])
        else:
            for ending, replacement in ordinal_endings:
                if word.endswith(ending):
                    word = "%s%s" % (word[:-len(ending)], replacement)

            if word not in numwords:
                raise Exception("Illegal word: " + word)

            scale, increment = numwords[word]

        if scale > 1:
            current = max(1, current)

        current = current * scale + increment
        if scale > 100:
            result += current
            current = 0

    return result + current
2
  • I think the correct english spelling of 100 is "one hundred".
    – recursive
    Commented Apr 27, 2011 at 20:14
  • @recursive you're absolutely right, but the advantage this code has is that it handles "hundredth" (perhaps that's what Dawa was trying to highlight). From the sound of the description, the other similar code needed "one hundredth" and that isn't always the commonly used term (eg as in "she picked out the hundredth item to discard")
    – Neil
    Commented Dec 29, 2016 at 23:05
1

A quick solution is to use the inflect.py to generate a dictionary for translation.

inflect.py has a number_to_words() function, that will turn a number (e.g. 2) to it's word form (e.g. 'two'). Unfortunately, its reverse (which would allow you to avoid the translation dictionary route) isn't offered. All the same, you can use that function to build the translation dictionary:

>>> import inflect
>>> p = inflect.engine()
>>> word_to_number_mapping = {}
>>>
>>> for i in range(1, 100):
...     word_form = p.number_to_words(i)  # 1 -> 'one'
...     word_to_number_mapping[word_form] = i
...
>>> print word_to_number_mapping['one']
1
>>> print word_to_number_mapping['eleven']
11
>>> print word_to_number_mapping['forty-three']
43

If you're willing to commit some time, it might be possible to examine inflect.py's inner-workings of the number_to_words() function and build your own code to do this dynamically (I haven't tried to do this).

1

There's a ruby gem by Marc Burns that does it. I recently forked it to add support for years. You can call ruby code from python.

  require 'numbers_in_words'
  require 'numbers_in_words/duck_punch'

  nums = ["fifteen sixteen", "eighty five sixteen",  "nineteen ninety six",
          "one hundred and seventy nine", "thirteen hundred", "nine thousand two hundred and ninety seven"]
  nums.each {|n| p n; p n.in_numbers}

results:
"fifteen sixteen" 1516 "eighty five sixteen" 8516 "nineteen ninety six" 1996 "one hundred and seventy nine" 179 "thirteen hundred" 1300 "nine thousand two hundred and ninety seven" 9297

7
  • Please don't call ruby code from python or python code from ruby. They're close enough that something like this should just get ported over.
    – yekta
    Commented Oct 10, 2016 at 11:51
  • 1
    Agreed, but until it's ported, calling ruby code is better than nothing.
    – dimid
    Commented Oct 10, 2016 at 12:59
  • Its not very complex, below @recursive has provided logic (with few lines of code) which can be used.
    – yekta
    Commented Oct 10, 2016 at 13:00
  • It actually looks to me that "fifteen sixteen" is wrong? Commented Oct 29, 2016 at 10:21
  • @yekta Right, I think recursive's answer is good within the scope of a SO answer. However, the gem provides a complete package with tests and other features. Anyhow, I think both have their place.
    – dimid
    Commented Oct 29, 2016 at 16:37
0

I took @recursive's logic and converted to Ruby. I've also hardcoded the lookup table so its not as cool but might help a newbie understand what is going on.

WORDNUMS = {"zero"=> [1,0], "one"=> [1,1], "two"=> [1,2], "three"=> [1,3],
            "four"=> [1,4], "five"=> [1,5], "six"=> [1,6], "seven"=> [1,7], 
            "eight"=> [1,8], "nine"=> [1,9], "ten"=> [1,10], 
            "eleven"=> [1,11], "twelve"=> [1,12], "thirteen"=> [1,13], 
            "fourteen"=> [1,14], "fifteen"=> [1,15], "sixteen"=> [1,16], 
            "seventeen"=> [1,17], "eighteen"=> [1,18], "nineteen"=> [1,19], 
            "twenty"=> [1,20], "thirty" => [1,30], "forty" => [1,40], 
            "fifty" => [1,50], "sixty" => [1,60], "seventy" => [1,70], 
            "eighty" => [1,80], "ninety" => [1,90],
            "hundred" => [100,0], "thousand" => [1000,0], 
            "million" => [1000000, 0]}

def text_2_int(string)
  numberWords = string.gsub('-', ' ').split(/ /) - %w{and}
  current = result = 0
  numberWords.each do |word|
    scale, increment = WORDNUMS[word]
    current = current * scale + increment
    if scale > 100
      result += current
      current = 0
    end
  end
  return result + current
end

I was looking to handle strings like two thousand one hundred and forty-six

0

This handles number in words of Indian style, some fractions, combination of numbers and words and also addition.

def words_to_number(words):
    numbers = {"zero":0, "a":1, "half":0.5, "quarter":0.25, "one":1,"two":2,
               "three":3, "four":4,"five":5,"six":6,"seven":7,"eight":8,
               "nine":9, "ten":10,"eleven":11,"twelve":12, "thirteen":13,
               "fourteen":14, "fifteen":15,"sixteen":16,"seventeen":17,
               "eighteen":18,"nineteen":19, "twenty":20,"thirty":30, "forty":40,
               "fifty":50,"sixty":60,"seventy":70, "eighty":80,"ninety":90}

    groups = {"hundred":100, "thousand":1_000, 
              "lac":1_00_000, "lakh":1_00_000, 
              "million":1_000_000, "crore":10**7, 
              "billion":10**9, "trillion":10**12}
    
    split_at = ["and", "plus"]
    
    n = 0
    skip = False
    words_array = words.split(" ")
    for i, word in enumerate(words_array):
        if not skip:
            if word in groups:
                n*= groups[word]
            elif word in numbers:
                n += numbers[word]
            elif word in split_at:
                skip = True
                remaining = ' '.join(words_array[i+1:])
                n+=words_to_number(remaining)
            else:
                try:
                    n += float(word)
                except ValueError as e:
                    raise ValueError(f"Invalid word {word}") from e
    return n

TEST:

print(words_to_number("a million and one"))
>> 1000001

print(words_to_number("one crore and one"))
>> 1000,0001

print(words_to_number("0.5 million one"))
>> 500001.0

print(words_to_number("half million and one hundred"))
>> 500100.0

print(words_to_number("quarter"))
>> 0.25

print(words_to_number("one hundred plus one"))
>> 101
1
  • I did some more tests, "seventeen hundred" = 1700 "one thousand and seven hundred" =1700 BUT "one thousand seven hundred" =(one thousand seven) hundred = 1007 * 100 = 100700. Is it technically wrong to say "one thousand seven hundred" instead of "one thousand AND seven hundred"?! Commented Jun 27, 2021 at 17:32
-1

I find I faster way:

Da_Unità_a_Cifre = {'one': 1, 'two': 2, 'three': 3, 'four': 4, 'five': 5, 'six': 6, 'seven': 7, 'eight': 8, 'nine': 9, 'ten': 10, 'eleven': 11,
 'twelve': 12, 'thirteen': 13, 'fourteen': 14, 'fifteen': 15, 'sixteen': 16, 'seventeen': 17, 'eighteen': 18, 'nineteen': 19}

Da_Lettere_a_Decine = {"tw": 20, "th": 30, "fo": 40, "fi": 50, "si": 60, "se": 70, "ei": 80, "ni": 90, }

elemento = input("insert the word:")
Val_Num = 0
try:
    elemento.lower()
    elemento.strip()
    Unità = elemento[elemento.find("ty")+2:] # è uguale alla str: five

    if elemento[-1] == "y":
        Val_Num = int(Da_Lettere_a_Decine[elemento[0] + elemento[1]])
        print(Val_Num)
    elif elemento == "onehundred":
        Val_Num = 100
        print(Val_Num)
    else:
        Cifre_Unità = int(Da_Unità_a_Cifre[Unità])
        Cifre_Decine = int(Da_Lettere_a_Decine[elemento[0] + elemento[1]])
        Val_Num = int(Cifre_Decine + Cifre_Unità)
        print(Val_Num)
except:
    print("invalid input")
-1

It's a cool solution, so I took @recursive's Python code from their answer and with help of ChatGPT I converted it to C# and also simplified it, formatted it, and made it a bit more compact.

Yes, I had to give a ton of instructions to ChatGPT. It took me a while, but here it is.

I believe it is clearer and easier to understand this code and how the algorithm works:

public class Parser
{
    public static int ParseInt(string s)
    {
        Dictionary<string, (int scale, int increment)> numwords = new Dictionary<string, (int, int)>
        {
            {"and", (1, 0)}, {"zero", (1, 0)}, {"one", (1, 1)}, {"two", (1, 2)}, {"three", (1, 3)},
            {"four", (1, 4)}, {"five", (1, 5)}, {"six", (1, 6)}, {"seven", (1, 7)}, {"eight", (1, 8)},
            {"nine", (1, 9)}, {"ten", (1, 10)}, {"eleven", (1, 11)}, {"twelve", (1, 12)}, {"thirteen", (1, 13)},
            {"fourteen", (1, 14)}, {"fifteen", (1, 15)}, {"sixteen", (1, 16)}, {"seventeen", (1, 17)}, {"eighteen", (1, 18)},
            {"nineteen", (1, 19)}, {"twenty", (1, 20)}, {"thirty", (1, 30)}, {"forty", (1, 40)}, {"fifty", (1, 50)},
            {"sixty", (1, 60)}, {"seventy", (1, 70)}, {"eighty", (1, 80)}, {"ninety", (1, 90)}, {"hundred", (100, 0)},
            {"thousand", (1000, 0)}, {"million", (1000000, 0)}, {"billion", (1000000000, 0)}
        };

        int current = 0;
        int result = 0;

        foreach (string word in s.Replace("-", " ").Split())
        {
            var (scale, increment) = numwords[word];

            current = current * scale + increment;

            if (scale > 100)
            {
                result += current;
                current = 0;
            }
        }

        return result + current;
    }
}
-2

This code works for a series data:

import pandas as pd
mylist = pd.Series(['one','two','three'])
mylist1 = []
for x in range(len(mylist)):
    mylist1.append(w2n.word_to_num(mylist[x]))
print(mylist1)
1
  • What's w2n? It is not defined anywhere
    – Tomerikoo
    Commented Aug 10, 2021 at 14:46
-3

This code works only for numbers below 99. Both word to int and int to word (for rest need to implement 10-20 lines of code and simple logic. This is just simple code for beginners):

num = input("Enter the number you want to convert : ")
mydict = {'1': 'One', '2': 'Two', '3': 'Three', '4': 'Four', '5': 'Five','6': 'Six', '7': 'Seven', '8': 'Eight', '9': 'Nine', '10': 'Ten','11': 'Eleven', '12': 'Twelve', '13': 'Thirteen', '14': 'Fourteen', '15': 'Fifteen', '16': 'Sixteen', '17': 'Seventeen', '18': 'Eighteen', '19': 'Nineteen'}
mydict2 = ['', '', 'Twenty', 'Thirty', 'Fourty', 'fifty', 'sixty', 'Seventy', 'Eighty', 'Ninty']

if num.isdigit():
    if(int(num) < 20):
        print(" :---> " + mydict[num])
    else:
        var1 = int(num) % 10
        var2 = int(num) / 10
        print(" :---> " + mydict2[int(var2)] + mydict[str(var1)])
else:
    num = num.lower()
    dict_w = {'one': 1, 'two': 2, 'three': 3, 'four': 4, 'five': 5, 'six': 6, 'seven': 7, 'eight': 8, 'nine': 9, 'ten': 10, 'eleven': 11, 'twelve': 12, 'thirteen': 13, 'fourteen': 14, 'fifteen': 15, 'sixteen': 16, 'seventeen': '17', 'eighteen': '18', 'nineteen': '19'}
    mydict2 = ['', '', 'twenty', 'thirty', 'fourty', 'fifty', 'sixty', 'seventy', 'eighty', 'ninty']
    divide = num[num.find("ty")+2:]
    if num:
        if(num in dict_w.keys()):
            print(" :---> " + str(dict_w[num]))
        elif divide == '' :
            for i in range(0, len(mydict2)-1):
                if mydict2[i] == num:
                    print(" :---> " + str(i * 10))
        else :
            str3 = 0
            str1 = num[num.find("ty")+2:]
            str2 = num[:-len(str1)]
            for i in range(0, len(mydict2)):
                if mydict2[i] == str2:
                    str3 = i
            if str2 not in mydict2:
                print("----->Invalid Input<-----")                
            else:
                try:
                    print(" :---> " + str((str3*10) + dict_w[str1]))
                except:
                    print("----->Invalid Input<-----")
    else:
        print("----->Please Enter Input<-----")
2
  • 1
    please explain what this code does, and how it does that. That way your answer is more valuable to those that don't understand coding that well yet.
    – Luuklag
    Commented Aug 21, 2017 at 12:14
  • If user gives digit as input program will return it in words and vice versa for example 5->five and for Five->5.program works for numbers below 100 but can be extended up to any range just by adding few lines of code. Commented Dec 6, 2017 at 6:45

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