2

I have a huge .txt file (15 GB) and having almost 30 million lines.

I want to put its lines to different files based on the 4th column. And the unique number of 4th column is around 2 million.

file1.txt
1  10  ABC KK-LK
1  33  23  KK-LK
2  34  32  CK-LK,LK
11 332 2   JK@
11 23  2   JK2

Right now, I can separate these lines to different files in the same folder as following:

awk '{ print $0 >> $4"_sep.txt" }' file1.txt

And it results in 4 different files as:

KK-LK_sep.txt
1 10 ABC KK-LK
1 33 23  KK-LK

and

CK-LK,LK_sep.txt
2 34 32  CK-LK,LK

and

JK@_sep.txt
11 332 2 JK@

and finally,

JK2_sep.txt
11 23  2 JK2

What I want is, to not to put 2 million files in one folder, to separate them into 20 different folders. I can make folders as folder1,2,3....:

mkdir folder{1..20}

With the answers below, I suppose something like broken below code would work:

#!/bin/env bash

shopt -s nullglob
numfiles=(*)
numfiles=${#numfiles[@]}
numdirs=(*/)
numdirs=${#numdirs[@]}
(( numfiles -= numdirs ))
echo $numfiles
var1=$numfiles

awk -v V1=var1 '{ 
  if(V1 <= 100000) 
  { 
    awk '{ print $0 >> $4"_sep.txt" }' file1.txt

  } 

  else if(V1 => 100000) 
  { 
   cd ../folder(cnt+1)
   awk '{ print $0 >> $4"_sep.txt" }' file1.txt

  } 


}'

But then, how can I make this a loop and stop adding up to the folder1 once it has 100.000 files in it, and start adding files to folder2 and so on?

  • If you don't need the first 100k to go in the first folder, and the second 100k to go in the second, etc., you can output to (NR % 20) "/" $4 "_sep.txt". – jas Mar 16 '18 at 17:21
  • I just need the lines which share the 4th column to be in the same file, but how can this code direct the files to the second folder once the first folder is full? – bapors Mar 19 '18 at 8:54
3
+50

Maybe this is what you want (untested since your question doesn't include an example we can test against):

awk '
    !($4 in key2out) {
        if ( (++numKeys % 100000) == 1 ) {
            dir = "dir" ++numDirs
            system("mkdir -p " dir)
        }
        key2out[$4] = dir "/" $4 "_sep.txt"
    }
    { print > key2out[$4] }
' file1.txt

That relies on GNU awk for managing the number of open files internally. With other awks you'd need to change that last line to { print >> key2out[$4]; close(key2out[$4]) } or otherwise handle how many concurrently open files you have to avoid getting a "too many open files" error, e.g. if your $4 values are usually grouped together then more efficiently than opening and closing the output file on every single write, you could just do it when the $4 value changes:

awk '
    $4 != prevKey { close(key2out[prevKey]) }
    !($4 in key2out) {
        if ( (++numKeys % 100000) == 1 ) {
            dir = "dir" ++numDirs
            system("mkdir -p " dir)
        }
        key2out[$4] = dir "/" $4 "_sep.txt"
    }
    { print >> key2out[$4]; prevKey=$4 }
' file1.txt
  • I am trying at the moment – bapors Mar 19 '18 at 9:00
  • 1
    I added another possible solution to my answer but having a testable example in your question really is important when asking a question. – Ed Morton Mar 19 '18 at 13:37
  • 1
    I was writing exactly the same ;). The only difference I would do is have numDirs to be set to numDirs=sprintf("%0.4d",numDirs+1). This makes it always a 4 digit directory name, which makes browsing easier. – kvantour Mar 19 '18 at 15:27
  • 1
    Good idea but I'd do it on the assignment to the dir name variable: dir=sprintf("dir%04d",numDirs). – Ed Morton Mar 19 '18 at 19:36
  • 1
    Thank you for explaning. It works well! – bapors Mar 20 '18 at 8:36
0

something like this? count the unique keys and increment bucket after threshold.

count += !keys[$4]++; 
bucket=count/100000; 
ibucket=int(bucket); 
ibucket=ibucket==bucket?ibucket:ibucket+1;    
folder="folder"ibucket
  • So we count the unique keys and bucket has the number of folders.But then,where do I put the awk '{ print $0 >> $4"_sep.txt" }' file1.txt? – bapors Mar 19 '18 at 8:57
  • It produces an error of : bash: !keys[: event not found – bapors Mar 19 '18 at 9:17
  • You need to add these into your script. This is a sniplet not a full script. – karakfa Mar 19 '18 at 10:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.