5

I was experimenting with different integer types in Visual Studio project in Windows using a simple exchange sort algorithm below. The processor is Intel. The code was compiled in Release x64. The optimization setting is "Maximize Speed (/O2)". The command line corresponding to the compilation settings is

/permissive- /GS /GL /W3 /Gy /Zc:wchar_t /Zi /Gm- /O2 /sdl /Fd"x64\Release\vc141.pdb" /Zc:inline /fp:precise /D "NDEBUG" /D "_CONSOLE" /D "_UNICODE" /D "UNICODE" /errorReport:prompt /WX- /Zc:forScope /Gd /Oi /MD /Fa"x64\Release\" /EHsc /nologo /Fo"x64\Release\" /Fp"x64\Release\SpeedTestForIntegerTypes.pch" /diagnostics:classic 

The code itself:

#include <ctime>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

void sort(int N, int A[], int WorkArray[]) // exchange sort
{
    int i, j, index, val_min;
    for (j = 0; j < N; j++)
    {
        val_min = 500000;
        for (i = j; i < N; i++)
        {
            if (A[i] < val_min)
            {
                val_min = A[i];
                index = i;
            }
        }
        WorkArray[j] = A[j];
        A[j] = val_min;
        A[index] = WorkArray[j];
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> A(400000), WorkArray(400000);
    for(size_t k = 0; k < 400000; k++)
        A[k] = 400000 - (k+1);

    clock_t begin = clock();

    sort(400000, &A[0], &WorkArray[0]);

    clock_t end = clock();
    double sortTime = double(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    std::cout << "Sort time: " << sortTime << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

The WorkArray is only needed to save the vector before sorting. The point is, this sorting took me 22.3 seconds to complete. The interesting part is that if I change type int to size_t for arrays A, WorkArray (both in std::vector and in the argument list of function sort), as well as for val_min, the time increases to 67.4! This is threefold slower! The new code is below:

#include <ctime>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

void sort(int N, size_t A[], size_t WorkArray[]) // exchange sort
{
    int i, j, index;
    size_t val_min;
    for (j = 0; j < N; j++)
    {
        val_min = 500000U;
        for (i = j; i < N; i++)
        {
            if (A[i] < val_min)
            {
                val_min = A[i];
                index = i;
            }
        }
        WorkArray[j] = A[j];
        A[j] = val_min;
        A[index] = WorkArray[j];
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<size_t> A(400000), WorkArray(400000);
    for(size_t k = 0; k < 400000; k++)
        A[k] = 400000 - (k+1);

    clock_t begin = clock();

    sort(400000, &A[0], &WorkArray[0]);

    clock_t end = clock();
    double sortTime = double(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    std::cout << "Sort time: " << sortTime << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Note that I still keep type int for function local variables i, j, index, N, and so the only two arithmetical operations that are i++ and j++ should take the same amount of time to perform in both cases. Therefore, this slowdown has to do with other reasons. Is it related to the memory alignment issue or register sizes or something else?

But the most outrageous part was when I changed int to unsigned int. Both unsigned int and int occupy the same number of bytes which is 4 (sizeof showed that). But the runtime for unsigned int was 65.8 s! While the first outcome was somewhat ok to accept, the second one totally confuses me! Why is there such a significant difference in time it takes to run such a simple algorithm that does not even involve sign checks?

Thanks to all addressing both of these questions. Where can I start reading more about these hardware-level optimization peculiarities? I don't care about the sorting algorithm itself, it's here for illustration of the problem only.

UPDATE: once again, I stress the fact that I use ints for array indices in all three cases.

  • 3
    When you change the types, do you change it everywhere or only in main? Could you post 2 versions of the code which behave differently to answer my question? – Benjamin Barrois Mar 16 '18 at 17:34
  • 4
    What are your optimization settings? In general, benchmarking should only be applied to released, non-debug, builds. – Thomas Matthews Mar 16 '18 at 17:35
  • 1
    No repro on GCC via Coliru. Also, there's a warning: main.cpp:23:16: warning: 'index' may be used uninitialized in this function [-Wmaybe-uninitialized] A[index] = WorkArray[j]; Unfortunately, I don't have MSVC in front of me to test this atm. – Mysticial Mar 16 '18 at 17:38
  • 1
    Tested the code on my machine. 42s for int, 41s for unsigned int. Was your machine otherwise idle when you tested both scenarios? (I'm uninterested in size_t as that's kind of a "duh it's twice as much data" thing to me.) – zzxyz Mar 16 '18 at 17:58
  • 1
    @StephenNewell That's pretty telling. MSVC is vectorizing with size_t but not int. But int vs. unsigned are almost identical. – Mysticial Mar 16 '18 at 18:04
7

Inspecting the generated assembly for all 3 variants (int, unsigned, size_t), the big difference is that in the int case the loop in the sort function is unrolled and uses SSE instructions (working on 8 ints at a time), while in the other 2 cases it does neither. Interestingly enough, the sort function is called in the int case, while it is inlined into main in the other two (likely due to the increased size of the function due to the loop unrolling).

I'm compiling from the command line using cl /nologo /W4 /MD /EHsc /Zi /Ox, using dumpbin to get the disassembly, with toolset Microsoft (R) C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 19.12.25830.2 for x64.

I get execution times of around 30 seconds for int and 100 seconds for the other two.

  • Thanks! Do you have any clue why it doesn't unroll for unsigned int considering it's the same size as int? – MajinSaha Mar 16 '18 at 20:09
  • 1
    That's the sad thing about closed-source compilers, unless you write it and violate the confidentiality agreement your employer, there is no way for anyone else to know why the compiler is doing what it does with specific optimizations. – David C. Rankin Mar 16 '18 at 20:13
  • 1
    Probably because there's an SSE instruction (pcmpgtd) to do a signed compare, but not one for an unsigned compare. – 1201ProgramAlarm Mar 16 '18 at 20:14
  • @1201ProgramAlarm - Interesting. Mine never generates this instruction or anything like it, although it uses other AVX/SSE instructions. – zzxyz Mar 16 '18 at 23:40
  • @1201ProgramAlarm - And VS 2015 and 2017 fairly different assembly (and 25s vs. 40s on 2015). – zzxyz Mar 17 '18 at 0:17
5

I tried this code in VS2017. I succeeded in reproducing.

I modified the code as follows so that the time is almost the same.

The cause seems to be due to the implicit casting of the array index.

#include <ctime>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

// exchange sort
template<typename elem_t, typename index_t>
void sort(index_t size, elem_t* a, elem_t* b)
{
    index_t index = 0, i, j;
    elem_t min;

    for (j = 0; j < size; j++)
    {
        min = 500000;
        for (i = j; i < size; i++)
        {
            if (a[i] < min)
            {
                min = a[i];
                index = i;
            }
        }
        b[j] = a[j];
        a[j] = min;
        a[index] = b[j];
    }
}

template<typename elem_t, typename index_t, index_t size>
void test() {
    //vector<elem_t> a(size);
    //vector<elem_t> b(size);

    elem_t a[size];
    elem_t b[size];

    for (index_t k = 0; k < size; k++)
        a[k] = (elem_t)(size - (k + 1));

    clock_t begin = clock();
    sort(size, &a[0], &b[0]);
    clock_t end = clock();

    double sortTime = double(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    cout << "Sort time: " << sortTime << endl;
}

int main()
{
    const int size = 40000;

    cout << "<size_t, int>" << endl;
    test<size_t, int, size>();
    cout << endl;

    cout << "<size_t, size_t>" << endl;
    test<size_t, size_t, size>();
    cout << endl;

    cout << "<int, int>" << endl;
    test<int, int, size>();
    cout << endl;

    cout << "<int, size_t>" << endl;
    test<int, size_t, size>();
    cout << endl;

    cout << "<uint, int>" << endl;
    test<unsigned int, int, size>();
    cout << endl;

    cout << "<uint, size_t>" << endl;
    test<unsigned int, size_t, size>();
    cout << endl;

    cout << "<uint, uint>" << endl;
    test<unsigned int, unsigned int, size>();
    cout << endl;
}

Personally, I do not like implicit casting. For troubleshooting this kind of problem, increase the warning level to the maximum, and resolve all warnings, and then convert to generic code. This will help you identify the problem.

The result of this code appears as a result of various combinations.

  • The phrase "Almost always auto" just keeps becoming more and more relevant – BTownTKD Mar 16 '18 at 18:19
  • How did you manage to reduce run times to 0.67 sec in all three cases!!!!!??????? But thanks for your great answer. I'll start digesting it slowly. – MajinSaha Mar 16 '18 at 18:20
  • @MajinSaha Decreased test size from 400000 to 40000. – Algirdas Preidžius Mar 16 '18 at 18:21
  • Oh, I see. Sorry, I didn't notice. – MajinSaha Mar 16 '18 at 18:22
  • 1
    Re: "I do not like implicit casting" -- there is no such thing. A cast is something you write in your source code to tell the compiler to do a conversion. That is, it's always explicit. Conversions can be implicit. – Pete Becker Mar 16 '18 at 18:24

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