5

I'm running a quick test to make sure I have my pointer arithmetic down:

main.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define ADDRESS    0xC0DCA11501LL
#define LENGTH     5


void print_address( char *, char );

/* Main program */
int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    char nums[ LENGTH ];

    /* LSB first */
    for( int i = 0; i < LENGTH; i++ )
    {
        nums[ i ] = ( ADDRESS >> ( 8 * i ) ) & 0xFF;
    }

    print_address( nums, LENGTH );

    system("PAUSE");

    return 0;
}

void print_address( char *data, char len )
{
     char *data_ptr = data;

     while( len-- )
     {
            printf( "%X\n", *data_ptr++ );
     }
}

What I expect is the bytes of ADDRESS to be printed out LSB first in hex format. But the last 3 bytes appear to be printed with 32-bit lengths:

1
15
FFFFFFA1
FFFFFFDC
FFFFFFC0
Press any key to continue . . .

Is this due to my bit-shifting arithmetic, something compiler-specific, some printf() behavior?

(I'm using MinGW GCC v6.3.0 on Windows 10 to compile.)

6
  • 3
    Betcha that char is a signed value and that you are seeing the FFFFs because A1 is greater than 0x80 and is showing up signed. Try using unsigned char pointer. Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 18:18
  • 1
    @MichaelDorgan D'oh! You're right -- changing the A, D, and C to 7s made it go away. Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 18:19
  • I'll make it a quick answer then. Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 18:20
  • 1
    also 0xC0DCA11501LL should be 0xC0DCA11501ULL. Shifting signed integers is undefined behaviour Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 18:26
  • Shifting negative signed integers in undefined. Shift positive signed integers is implementation defined. Still, unsigned is a better choice in these cases for many reasons. stackoverflow.com/questions/4009885/… Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 18:48

3 Answers 3

5

I believe that your char is a being used as a signed value and that you are seeing the FFFFs because 0xA1 is greater than 0x80 and is therefore showing up signed. Try using unsigned char pointer (and for the nums array and data in your function prototype) and the problem should go away.

3
  • 1
    I assume that "Betcha" is a slang for "I bet that". Is my assumption correct?
    – machine_1
    Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 18:36
  • Yes - sorry for the slang. Betcha is I bet that. Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 18:47
  • Please compile it and let me know how that works. Because that was also my first guess but it didn't work to me. If it works, I remove my answer. If it does not work, upvote mine :-) Commented Mar 18, 2018 at 19:27
2

Type char seems to be signed in your environment, such that A1 as an 8 bit value actually represents a negative number. Note then that the varargs of printf are promoted to int type, and a negative number is filled up with leading 1-bits. In other words, signed A1 when promoted to 32 bit integer will give FFFFFFA1. That's why.

Use unsigned char instead:

void print_address( unsigned char *, char );

/* Main program */
int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    unsigned char nums[ LENGTH ];

    /* LSB first */
    for( int i = 0; i < LENGTH; i++ )
    {
        nums[ i ] = ( ADDRESS >> ( 8 * i ) ) & 0xFF;
    }

    print_address( nums, LENGTH );

    system("PAUSE");

    return 0;
}

void print_address( unsigned char *data, char len )
{
    unsigned char *data_ptr = data;

    while( len-- )
    {
        printf( "%X\n", *data_ptr++ );
    }
}
0

The problem is that printf does not know that the type of your data is char.

Try this

void print_address( char *data, char len )
{
     char *data_ptr = data;

     while( len-- )
     {
            printf( "%02X\n", *data_ptr++ &0xFF);
     }
}

Result:

[jmgomez@d1 tmp]$ a.o
01
15
A1
DC
C0
sh: PAUSE: command not found
[jmgomez@d1 tmp]$
1
  • 1
    While this does work, it does so by hiding the signed/unsigned issue with truncation. Better to work with unsigned when doing byte work to prevent the issue beforehand. Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 18:52

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