82

If I have an NSTimeInterval that is set to say 200.0, is there a way to convert that into 00:03:20, I was thinking I could initialise an NSDate with it and then use NSDateFormatter using HH:mm:ss. My question is, is there a quick way to do this or do I have to break up the number myself and use [NSString stringWithFormat: %02d:%02d:%02d, myHour, myMin, mySec]?

12 Answers 12

193

No need to use NSDateFormatter or anything else than division and modulo. NSTimeInterval is just a double containing seconds.

Swift

func stringFromTimeInterval(interval: NSTimeInterval) -> String {
    let interval = Int(interval)
    let seconds = interval % 60
    let minutes = (interval / 60) % 60
    let hours = (interval / 3600)
    return String(format: "%02d:%02d:%02d", hours, minutes, seconds)
}

Objective-C

- (NSString *)stringFromTimeInterval:(NSTimeInterval)interval {
    NSInteger ti = (NSInteger)interval;
    NSInteger seconds = ti % 60;
    NSInteger minutes = (ti / 60) % 60;
    NSInteger hours = (ti / 3600);
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02ld:%02ld:%02ld", (long)hours, (long)minutes, (long)seconds];
}
  • Much appreciated, thats what I was thinking but I just wanted to check that I was not missing something already included as part of the iOS SDK. – fuzzygoat Feb 8 '11 at 13:11
  • Than you. Just saved me a headache. – Robert Jul 18 '13 at 13:41
  • 1
    I want to point out that ":" works as a delimiter only in English and some other languages. Finnish, for example, uses "." - like this "15.02.59" – sgosha Aug 5 '14 at 20:09
  • 20
    this is the wrong answer since it doesn't localize the delimiter (as other comments mention). using NSDateCompomentsFormatter you can correctly format your time interval in a single line, e.g. NSDateComponentsFormatter().stringFromTimeInterval(NSTimeInterval(duration)) in swift – Ilias Karim Jun 3 '15 at 18:06
  • 4
    For localization and future proofing, the correct solution is to use NSDateComponentsFormatter as described by @jrc – voidref Jul 2 '15 at 0:52
101

On iOS 8, use NSDateComponentsFormatter.

NSDateComponentsFormatter *dateComponentsFormatter = [[NSDateComponentsFormatter alloc] init];
NSLog(@"%@", [dateComponentsFormatter stringFromTimeInterval:200.0]);

outputs "3:20".

NSDateComponentsFormatter *dateComponentsFormatter = [[NSDateComponentsFormatter alloc] init];
dateComponentsFormatter.zeroFormattingBehavior = NSDateComponentsFormatterZeroFormattingBehaviorPad;
dateComponentsFormatter.allowedUnits = (NSCalendarUnitHour | NSCalendarUnitMinute | NSCalendarUnitSecond);
NSLog(@"%@", [dateComponentsFormatter stringFromTimeInterval:200.0]);

outputs "0:03:20".

  • 2
    Nice update. But if it's really just such a simple calculation, wouldn't be using these object a huge overhead (as long as there is no dynamic format involved)? – Julian F. Weinert Aug 28 '15 at 17:08
  • 2
    you need the formatting to ensure the string appears correctly for different locales etc. – Max MacLeod Apr 14 '16 at 10:20
  • Really tiny comment, but it is weird to give an example of C function for ObjectiveC question. Probably worth changing it into ObjectiveC format? – Rilakkuma May 24 '16 at 6:56
  • this should be the accepted answer @fuzzygoat , for obvious localisation reasons. – Bersaelor Jun 9 '16 at 12:58
  • Saved me a ton of code! This is how I used it for OrangeIRC. – ahyattdev Dec 27 '16 at 4:13
16

Swift 3 version of onmyway133's answer:

import Foundation

func format(_ duration: TimeInterval) -> String {
    let formatter = DateComponentsFormatter()
    formatter.zeroFormattingBehavior = .pad
    formatter.allowedUnits = [.minute, .second]

    if duration >= 3600 {
        formatter.allowedUnits.insert(.hour)
    }

    return formatter.string(from: duration)!
}


print(format(12)) // 0:12
print(format(65)) // 1:05
print(format(1750)) // 29:10
print(format(3890)) // 1:04:50
print(format(45720)) // 12:42:00
  • Is creating a DateComponentsFormatter expensive performancewise, like a DateFormatter or NumberFormatter? – Moshe Sep 15 '17 at 22:07
  • 1
    Instead of checking if there's an hour value, setting zeroFormattingBehavior to be [.dropLeading, .pad] might be a better (less code) option. – MaddTheSane Oct 28 '18 at 23:47
10

Some extra lines of code, but I feel using NSDateComponents will give a more precise value.

- (NSString *)getTimeRepresentationFromDate:(NSDate *)iDate withTimeInterval:(NSTimeInterval)iTimeInterval {
    NSString *aReturnValue = nil;
    NSDate *aNewDate = [iDate dateByAddingTimeInterval:iTimeInterval]; 

    unsigned int theUnits = NSHourCalendarUnit | NSMinuteCalendarUnit | NSSecondCalendarUnit;
    NSCalendar *aCalender = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
    NSDateComponents *aDateComponents = [aCalender components:theUnits fromDate:iDate toDate:aNewDate options:0];

    aReturnValue = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d:%d:%d", [aDateComponents hour], [aDateComponents minute], [aDateComponents second]];

    return aReturnValue;
}
  • The above method uses the 2 dates using which the TimeInterval is created. You can also pass [NSDate date] to iDate parameter as a default value. – Roshit Nov 13 '11 at 10:30
  • 2
    In what way is this "more precise" than the method used by @matthias-bauch? – j b Jul 1 '13 at 16:59
  • 1
    with this method u get time interval in seconds, hours , min i.e. in terms of 60 while @matthias-bauch's answer gives you in decimal terms for example if you wait for sufficient time you will see 1 min 79 sec instead of 2 min 19 sec – Ashish Pisey Jan 28 '14 at 8:38
  • This is a much better solution than the accepted solution. The use of ":" is still a problem for internationalization, but at least this is robust across leap days and daylight savings boundaries. – evanflash Aug 26 '14 at 18:30
  • @AshishPisey The modulo operator prevents anything bigger than 59. – Matthias Bauch Oct 4 '14 at 14:11
8

In Swift 2, iOS 8+. This makes sure we only show hour when necessary

func format(duration: NSTimeInterval) -> String {
  let formatter = NSDateComponentsFormatter()
  formatter.zeroFormattingBehavior = .Pad

  if duration >= 3600 {
    formatter.allowedUnits = [.Hour, .Minute, .Second]
  } else {
    formatter.allowedUnits = [.Minute, .Second]
  }

  return formatter.stringFromTimeInterval(duration) ?? ""
}

So you have

print(format(12)) // 0:12
print(format(65)) // 1:05
print(format(1750)) // 29:10
print(format(3890)) // 1:04:50
print(format(45720)) // 12:42:00
4
NSTimeInterval ti = 3667;
double hours = floor(ti / 60 / 60);
double minutes = floor((ti - (hours * 60 * 60)) / 60);
double seconds = floor(ti - (hours * 60 * 60) - (minutes * 60));
3

To "extend" Matthias Bauch's suggestion, in Swift I would make this a computed property of NSTimeInterval:

extension NSTimeInterval {
  var stringValue: String {
    let interval = Int(self)
    let seconds = interval % 60
    let minutes = (interval / 60) % 60
    let hours = (interval / 3600)
    return String(format: "%02d:%02d:%02d", hours, minutes, seconds)
  }
}

The advantage of this is it's attached to the NSTimeInterval type, not your view controller or wherever else you put that function. To use you'd go something like:

let timeInterval = NSDate().timeIntervalSinceDate(start)        
self.elapsedTimeLabel.text = timeInterval.stringValue
  • Thanks, Kenny! In my case I needed them separately, so I added additional variables to your extension: "var seconds: Int { let interval = Int(self); let seconds = interval % 60; return seconds }" and so on for minutes and hours. So that usage will be: print("minutes spent: (timeInterval.minutes)") – Vitalii Aug 19 '16 at 13:07
2

Swift 4

DateComponentsFormatter().string(from: <# TimeInterval #>)

ex:

DateComponentsFormatter().string(from: 59.0)
1

Based on answer by @onmyway133 here is the Swift 4 version:

func format(duration: TimeInterval) -> String {
    let formatter = DateComponentsFormatter()
    formatter.zeroFormattingBehavior = .pad

    if duration >= 3600 {
        formatter.allowedUnits = [.hour, .minute, .second];
    } else {
        formatter.allowedUnits = [.minute, .second];
    }

    return formatter.string(from: duration) ?? "";
}
0

straight from apple docs: in h file:

 @property(strong,nonatomic)NSDateComponentsFormatter *timerFormatter;

in m file

@synthesize timerFormatter;

- (void)viewDidLoad {
[super viewDidLoad];
NSDateComponentsFormatter *timerFormatter = [[NSDateComponentsFormatter alloc] init];
timerFormatter.unitsStyle = NSDateComponentsFormatterUnitsStylePositional; 
//10:59 Positional THIS ONE DOES NOT SEEM TO WORK iOS<9 WHEN <1Minute JUST SHOWS 01, 10m 59s Abbreviated, 10min 59sec Short, 10minutes 59seconds Full ...
timerFormatter.allowedUnits = NSCalendarUnitHour|NSCalendarUnitMinute|NSCalendarUnitSecond;
}

whereever you need to convert your NSTimeInterval timeInterval to hh:mm:ss string, do this:

NSString *txt=[timerFormatter stringFromTimeInterval:timeInterval];
0

I guess, the timer fraction should be ceiled out. As Matthias' code was creating that issue in seconds, I use the following slightly modified from that of Matthias

    - (NSString *)stringFromTimeInterval:(NSTimeInterval)interval {
        int ti = (int) ceil(interval);
        int seconds = ti % 60;
        int minutes = (ti / 60) % 60;
        int hours = (ti / 3600);
        return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02d:%02d:%02d",hours, minutes, seconds];
    }
0

Objective C version of onmyway133's answer

- (NSString*) formatTimeInterval:(NSTimeInterval) timeInterval {

    NSDateComponentsFormatter *formatter = [[NSDateComponentsFormatter alloc] init];

    formatter.zeroFormattingBehavior = NSDateComponentsFormatterZeroFormattingBehaviorPad;

    if (timeInterval > 3600) {
        formatter.allowedUnits = NSCalendarUnitHour | NSCalendarUnitMinute | NSCalendarUnitSecond;
    } else {
        formatter.allowedUnits = NSCalendarUnitMinute | NSCalendarUnitSecond;
    }

    return [formatter stringFromTimeInterval:timeInterval];
}

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