When a BUILD phaser is called, it overrides default attribute assignment in Perl6. Suppose we have to use that BUILD phaser, like we do in this module (that's where I met this problem). What's the way of assigning values to attributes in that phase? I have used this

class my-class {
    has $.dash-attribute;

    submethod BUILD(*%args) {
        for %args.kv -> $k, $value {
            self."$k"( $value );
        }
    }
};

my $my-instance = my-class.new( dash-attribute => 'This is the attribute' );

And I get this error

Too many positionals passed; expected 1 argument but got 2

Other combinations of $!or $., direct assignment, declaring the attribute as rw (same error) yield different kind of errors. This is probably just a syntax issue, but I couldn't find the solution. Any help will be appreciated.

  • 4
    Not sure why you would want to write it like that, if the absence of the BUILD method would already give you the same functionality. Assuming you want to add some logic later, maybe a TWEAK method would be better in that situation? Please see docs.perl6.org/language/objects#Object_Construction – Elizabeth Mattijsen Mar 17 at 12:07
  • 1
    It's the basic code to reproduce the error; in fact, it uses the BUILD phase to add roles. Which probably can be done elsewhere, too. – jjmerelo Mar 18 at 8:09
  • 1
    Ditto what @ElizabethMattijsen said above. If the only thing you want is to assign to attributes, you don't need the BUILD phase at all. – Christopher Bottoms Mar 22 at 13:07
up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are two things wrong in your example, the way I see it. First of all, if you want an attribute to be writeable, you will need to mark it is rw. Secondly, changing the value of an attribute is done by assignment, rather than by giving the new value as an argument.

So I think the code should be:

class my-class {
    has $.dash-attribute is rw;

    submethod BUILD(*%args) {
        for %args.kv -> $k, $value {
            self."$k"() = $value;
        }
    }
};

my $my-instance = my-class.new( dash-attribute => 'attribute value' );
dd $my-instance;
# my-class $my-instance = my-class.new(dash-attribute => "attribute value")
  • 1
    What is the parenthesis after "$k" for? – Christopher Bottoms Mar 21 at 11:32
  • 2
    That's the Perl 6 syntax to indicate that you want to call a method of which the name is in the variable $k. Compare: say Int.new; # 0 with say Int."new" # Quoted method name requires parenthesized arguments. If you meant to concatenate two strings, use '~'. with `say Int."new"() # 0 – Elizabeth Mattijsen Mar 21 at 22:14
  • Thanks! It caught me off guard when I saw parentheses and assignment together like that. – Christopher Bottoms Mar 22 at 13:08

You could do it the same way the object system normally does it under the hood for you.
(not recommended)

class C {
  has $.d;

  submethod BUILD ( *%args ){
    for self.^attributes {
      my $short-name = .name.substr(2); # remove leading 「$!」
      next unless %args{$short-name}:exists;
      .set_value( self, %args{$short-name} )
    }
  }
}

say C.new(d => 42)
C.new(d => 42)

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