179

I'm using fetch API within my React app. The application was deployed on a server and was working perfectly. I tested it multiple times. But, suddenly the application stopped working and I've no clue why. The issue is when I send a get request, I'm receiving a valid response from the server but also the fetch API is catching an exception and showing TypeError: Failed to fetch. I didn't even make any changes to the code and it's the issue with all of the React components.

I'm getting a valid response:

enter image description here

But also getting this error at the same time:

enter image description here

fetch(url)
.then(res => res.json())
.then(data => {
  // do something with data
})
.catch(rejected => {
    console.log(rejected);
});

When I remove credentials: "include", it works on localhost, but not on the server.

I tried every solution given on StackOverflow and GitHub, but it's just not working out for me.

5
  • 2
    I have the same issue: I have just one request (the DevTools confirm it), it's returning a success response with code 200, but the promise is being rejected with "Failed to fetch".
    – fiatjaf
    Commented Apr 17, 2018 at 20:39
  • @fiatjaf, can you remove the json parsing and see if it works fine? Commented Apr 17, 2018 at 21:04
  • 1
    @TarunLalwani, I've removed it and it doesn't work fine.
    – fiatjaf
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 16:27
  • Seems like Yugantar's answer has solved your issue? Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 16:29
  • 1
    @TarunLalwani the problem was because of http:// not mentioned in the address in ACAO. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 17:31

17 Answers 17

135
+300

This could be an issue with the response you are receiving from the backend. If it was working fine on the server then the problem could be within the response headers.

Check the value of Access-Control-Allow-Origin in the response headers. Usually fetch API will throw fail to fetch even after receiving a response when the response headers' Access-Control-Allow-Origin and the origin of request won't match.

3
  • 7
    Could you please elaborate on this answer? I am new to node.js and back-end environment. So, I could not understand a word you said. P.S. A code example would be great :) Commented Jan 21, 2019 at 7:34
  • 6
    An expanded explanation can be found at medium.com/@baphemot/understanding-cors-18ad6b478e2b. Commented Feb 16, 2019 at 22:51
  • 2
    I was testing the response to a lost session and got this error. The REST call sends back a redirect from a different server and if breaks Referrer Policy: strict-origin-when-cross-origin. This is a poor error response from the Fetch API. Commented Oct 26, 2020 at 17:27
46

I understand this question might have a React-specific cause, but it shows up first in search results for "Typeerror: Failed to fetch" and I wanted to lay out all possible causes here.

The Fetch spec lists times when you throw a TypeError from the Fetch API: https://fetch.spec.whatwg.org/#fetch-api

Relevant passages as of January 2021 are below. These are excerpts from the text.

4.6 HTTP-network fetch

To perform an HTTP-network fetch using request with an optional credentials flag, run these steps:
...
16. Run these steps in parallel:
...
2. If aborted, then:
...
3. Otherwise, if stream is readable, error stream with a TypeError.

To append a name/value name/value pair to a Headers object (headers), run these steps:

  1. Normalize value.
  2. If name is not a name or value is not a value, then throw a TypeError.
  3. If headers’s guard is "immutable", then throw a TypeError.

Filling Headers object headers with a given object object:

To fill a Headers object headers with a given object object, run these steps:

  1. If object is a sequence, then for each header in object:
    1. If header does not contain exactly two items, then throw a TypeError.

Method steps sometimes throw TypeError:

The delete(name) method steps are:

  1. If name is not a name, then throw a TypeError.
  2. If this’s guard is "immutable", then throw a TypeError.

The get(name) method steps are:

  1. If name is not a name, then throw a TypeError.
  2. Return the result of getting name from this’s header list.

The has(name) method steps are:

  1. If name is not a name, then throw a TypeError.

The set(name, value) method steps are:

  1. Normalize value.
  2. If name is not a name or value is not a value, then throw a TypeError.
  3. If this’s guard is "immutable", then throw a TypeError.

To extract a body and a Content-Type value from object, with an optional boolean keepalive (default false), run these steps:
...
5. Switch on object:
...
ReadableStream
If keepalive is true, then throw a TypeError.
If object is disturbed or locked, then throw a TypeError.

In the section "Body mixin" if you are using FormData there are several ways to throw a TypeError. I haven't listed them here because it would make this answer very long. Relevant passages: https://fetch.spec.whatwg.org/#body-mixin

In the section "Request Class" the new Request(input, init) constructor is a minefield of potential TypeErrors:

The new Request(input, init) constructor steps are:
...
6. If input is a string, then:
...
2. If parsedURL is a failure, then throw a TypeError.
3. IF parsedURL includes credentials, then throw a TypeError.
...
11. If init["window"] exists and is non-null, then throw a TypeError.
...
15. If init["referrer" exists, then:
...
1. Let referrer be init["referrer"].
2. If referrer is the empty string, then set request’s referrer to "no-referrer".
3. Otherwise:
1. Let parsedReferrer be the result of parsing referrer with baseURL.
2. If parsedReferrer is failure, then throw a TypeError.
...
18. If mode is "navigate", then throw a TypeError.
...
23. If request's cache mode is "only-if-cached" and request's mode is not "same-origin" then throw a TypeError.
...
27. If init["method"] exists, then:
...
2. If method is not a method or method is a forbidden method, then throw a TypeError.
...
32. If this’s request’s mode is "no-cors", then:
1. If this’s request’s method is not a CORS-safelisted method, then throw a TypeError.
...
35. If either init["body"] exists and is non-null or inputBody is non-null, and request’s method is GET or HEAD, then throw a TypeError.
...
38. If body is non-null and body's source is null, then:
1. If this’s request’s mode is neither "same-origin" nor "cors", then throw a TypeError.
...
39. If inputBody is body and input is disturbed or locked, then throw a TypeError.

The clone() method steps are:

  1. If this is disturbed or locked, then throw a TypeError.

In the Response class:

The new Response(body, init) constructor steps are:
...
2. If init["statusText"] does not match the reason-phrase token production, then throw a TypeError.
...
8. If body is non-null, then:
1. If init["status"] is a null body status, then throw a TypeError.
...

The static redirect(url, status) method steps are:
...
2. If parsedURL is failure, then throw a TypeError.

The clone() method steps are:

  1. If this is disturbed or locked, then throw a TypeError.

In section "The Fetch method"

The fetch(input, init) method steps are:
...
9. Run the following in parallel:
To process response for response, run these substeps:
...
3. If response is a network error, then reject p with a TypeError and terminate these substeps.

In addition to these potential problems, there are some browser-specific behaviors which can throw a TypeError. For instance, if you set keepalive to true and have a payload > 64 KB you'll get a TypeError on Chrome, but the same request can work in Firefox. These behaviors aren't documented in the spec, but you can find information about them by Googling for limitations for each option you're setting in fetch.

4
  • 1
    But do all of these type errors say "Failed to fetch" as their error message?
    – ADJenks
    Commented Jul 21, 2021 at 18:21
  • 2
    @ADJenks No. The spec does not specify what the annotation attached to an error should be. Therefore the included message (or lack thereof) is browser-dependent. Commented Jul 22, 2021 at 19:17
  • 1
    " if you set keepalive to true and have a payload > 64 KB " Saved my day. Thank you!
    – terpimost
    Commented Feb 6, 2023 at 20:51
  • 2
    MDN has a pretty readable list of error reasons: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/fetch#exceptions
    – tagurit
    Commented Apr 2 at 14:56
26

I've simply input "http://" before "localhost" in the url.

2
  • This worked for me. But I would like to know why that worked.
    – Sushant
    Commented Feb 23, 2023 at 13:22
  • This should be at the top. The reason for the error is unkown scheme. All fetch urls need a valid url scheme http://localhost:3000.
    – Ethan
    Commented Mar 17 at 17:34
9

Note that there is an unrelated issue in your code but that could bite you later: you should return res.json() or you will not catch any error occurring in JSON parsing or your own function processing data.

Back to your error: You cannot have a TypeError: failed to fetch with a successful request. You probably have another request (check your "network" panel to see all of them) that breaks and causes this error to be logged. Also, maybe check "Preserve log" to be sure the panel is not cleared by any indelicate redirection. Sometimes I happen to have a persistent "console" panel, and a cleared "network" panel that leads me to have error in console which is actually unrelated to the visible requests. You should check that.

Or you (but that would be vicious) actually have a hardcoded console.log('TypeError: failed to fetch') in your final .catch ;) and the error is in reality in your .then() but it's hard to believe.

3
  • actually once CORS check failed failure appers on Console tab only but Network shows request was successful(it does make some sense - in general meaning request itself was successful but content does not pass security check).
    – skyboyer
    Commented Apr 22, 2018 at 20:04
  • 2
    Actually, I have the same issue: Network shows DELETE request was successful with a 202 response but the f"etch request got a "TypeError: failed to fetch" error in the app. And response headers on an external rest call show "Access-Control-Allow-Origin" = *. May have something to do with OPTIONS support on the server?
    – JESii
    Commented Mar 15, 2019 at 16:03
  • I have a similar problem, we are doing a POST, but in chrome, it says type = fetch and get the error "TypeError: Failed to fetch" almost immediately Commented Aug 22, 2019 at 8:35
8

If your are invoking fetch on a localhost server, use non-SSL unless you have a valid certificate for localhost. fetch will fail on an invalid or self signed certificate especially on localhost.

3
  • 3
    Ca you elaborate on how to use non-SSL? Commented Dec 27, 2021 at 13:59
  • @AdityaGarg I'd guess pingle60 means using http instead of https (i.e. http://localhost...) Commented May 26, 2023 at 19:08
  • Using non https solved Load Failed issue for me. That's all that's caught in the exception.
    – hackerl33t
    Commented Aug 20, 2023 at 13:18
4

In my case I got "TypeError" when using online JS tools like jsfiddle or stackblitz and the problem was that my url was http instead of https.

1
  • 2
    This was exactly my problem. Specifically, I was using Swagger to test my service and somehow Swagger defaulted all the curl calls to http in stead of https. Once I got that fixed, the problem was solved. That was a tricky one.
    – Forrest
    Commented Apr 6, 2021 at 21:34
4

Behind the scenes the XHR client sends an HTTPOPTIONS request, called pre-flight, to look for certain security permission headers, called CORS Allow headers. If the required headers are not found (as in you might not have the necessary permissions), TypeError is the result since it has not actually tried to send your POST/GET request. You can observe this behavior in the browser console: it looks like the browser makes two requests to the same location, first having the HTTP Method: OPTIONS.

3

I spent a few hours on this error in my project involving Vue / Nuxt 3.0.0 and Supabase Edge Functions. I finally realized that I wasn't including the corsHeader on the success response, only the error response. So everything worked, and it returned Status Code 201, but it popped as error. Simple solution to a frustrating problem. Left this here because my search brought me back here multiple times. Hope it helps!

See how they add ...corsHeaders to both the successful and error responses here: https://supabase.com/docs/guides/functions/cors

1

I was getting this issue since I have not added CORS in my flask app. I need to add it, then it worked, here are the lines:

...
from flask_cors import CORS

def create_app(test_config=None ):

    app = Flask(__name__)

    app.config.from_object('config')  # Import things from config

    CORS(app)

    # CORS Headers 
    @app.after_request
    def after_request(response):
        response.headers.add('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'Content-Type,Authorization,true')
        response.headers.add('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'GET,PUT,POST,DELETE,OPTIONS')
        return response

    ...

1

In my case, this error was caused by the missing always parameter to the add_header directive of nginx.

For example, when our backend was sending an error response, such as in PHP header('HTTP', ERROR_CODE), was resulting in CORS headers missing from response.

As the docs states about add_header directive

Adds the specified field to a response header provided that the response code equals 200, 201 (1.3.10), 204, 206, 301, 302, 303, 304, 307 (1.1.16, 1.0.13), or 308 (1.13.0).

and about always parameter

If the always parameter is specified (1.7.5), the header field will be added regardless of the response code.

Adding the always parameter to any required headers fixed the issue for me, like so:

add_header HEADER_NAME "HEADER_VALUE" always;
1

In my case I was trying to make fetch requests to my Django API via localhost and I was able to make it work by changing my URL from:

var url = "http://127.0.0.1:8000/";

to:

var url = "http://localhost:8000/";
1

In my case the error is due to not able to find the certificate locally.

I called the await fetch (url) inside the try block and then console.log(err.cause). The output is {"code":"UNABLE_TO_GET_ISSUER_CERT_LOCALLY"}.

For me the issue is only in local development environment. I fixed this by setting the environment variable export NODE_TLS_REJECT_UNAUTHORIZED=0

0

This question comes up first when googling the same error, so sharing the solution here for others:

If you use Sentry, you need to add the 'sentry-trace' value to your servers Access-Control-Allow-Headers list.

Issue here https://github.com/getsentry/sentry-javascript/issues/3185

0

after struggling a few hours on that error, I would like to share my solution

<a
    :href="some_props_with_default_value"
    @click="externalCalculationViaFetch()"
>
Calculate 
</a>

There was a problem with some_props_with_default_value that generating a page refresh.

The page refresh was canceling the fetch request before getting a response and raising this error.

Went back to normal when fixing the page refresh :

<a
    @click="externalCalculationViaFetch()"
>
Calculate 
</a>

Hope it helps someone.

0

I was getting this issue when upload file, the file size is too large, choose smaller file works, reference to this post.

0

Came back after an hour of research and the reason for this might be that the server and client are running on different domains, hence you encounter cross-origin-resource-sharing issues. So what I did was configure my server to handle CORS like so

Install cors package

npm i cors

Then in your server code

// Include cors 
const cors = require('cors');

// Use cors middleware
app.use(cors({
    origin: '*', // Wildcard is NOT for Production
    methods: 'GET,HEAD,PUT,PATCH,POST,DELETE',
    credentials: true,
}));

If you are sending form data you might want to modify your fetch api to add 'Content-Type': 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded' specifying that you are sending form data like so

fetch(url,
 headers: {
        'Content-Type': 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded',
    },
)
.then(res => res.json())
.then(data => {
  // do something with data
})
.catch(rejected => {
    console.log(rejected);
});

This worked for me.

-2

React Query/ Tanstack Query | Next JS

The API causing the issue is a GET API implemented with useMutation()

As per docs queries are used to get data from a server whereas mutations are used to do CUD operations

Here in our case, we are using a mutation to get data from the server which is against DOCS.

Tanstack nowhere mentioned that using them interchangeably would lead to this error.

But changing useMutation to useQuery for the GET request fixed the issue.

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