3

I am having a file as :

file1.txt

1  10  ABC KK-LK
1  33  23  KK-LK
2  34  32  CK-LK,LK
11 332 2   JK@
21 525 1   JK@
31 902 9   JK@
11 23  2   JK2

I am trying to see the number of lines being used by identifiers in 4th column:

KK-LK 1-2
CK-LK 3-3
JK@   4-6
JK2   7-7

If I apply the code below, I can have the number of lines, but it prints it in a new line rather than a range, which would be a problem since each identifier has at least 1 million lines:

grep -n "KK-LK" file1.txt | awk -F  ":" '{print $1}'
1
2

How can I convert this to a range?

  • what if lines with same identifier are in different positions, what should be the range in that case? – RomanPerekhrest Mar 19 '18 at 11:02
  • Well, I have sorted it, so in case that they are not consecutive, it would sort first and then do the range? – bapors Mar 19 '18 at 11:20
  • 1
    for line 3 CK-LK,LK, why the LK is dropped in the output? – karakfa Mar 19 '18 at 15:03
2

awk solution:

awk '{ if ($4 in a) sub(/-[0-9]+/, "-"NR, a[$4]); else a[$4] = NR"-"NR }
     END{ for (i in a) print i, a[i] }' file

The output:

JK2 7-7
CK-LK,LK 3-3
JK@ 4-6
KK-LK 1-2
  • 1
    It works well and it is very quick! – bapors Mar 20 '18 at 8:37
2

Could you please try following and let me know if this helps you.

awk '{a[$NF]=a[$NF]?a[$NF] OFS FNR:FNR} END{for(i in a){num=split(a[i],array," ");if(num>1){print i,array[1] "-" array[num]} else {print i,a[i]"-"a[i]}}}'  Input_file

Adding a non-one liner form of solution too now.

awk '
{
  a[$NF]=a[$NF]?a[$NF] OFS FNR:FNR}
END{
  for(i in a){
    num=split(a[i],array," ");
    if(num>1){
      print i,array[1] "-" array[num]}
    else{
      print i,a[i]"-"a[i]}
}}
'   Input_file
2

another awk

$ awk '{if($NF in a) b[$NF]=NR; 
        else a[$NF]=b[$NF]=NR} 
    END{for(k in a) print k,a[k]"-"b[k]}' file | sort -k2 | column -t

KK-LK     1-2
CK-LK,LK  3-3
JK@       4-6
JK2       7-7

or, since NR>0

$ awk '!a[$NF]{a[$NF]=NR} {b[$NF]=NR} END{for(k in a) print k,a[k]"-"b[k]}'
1

You can do it in a one-pass fashion like this:

parse.awk

# Initialize start-line and id variables
NR == 1  { s=1; id = $4 }      

# When the id no longer matches print the range
$4 != id { 
  print id ": " s "-" NR-1

  # Reset variables for the next id
  s=NR; id=$4
}

# Print the last range when EOF occurs
END { 
  print id ": " s "-" NR
}

Run it like this:

awk -f parse.awk infile.txt

Output:

KK-LK: 1-2
CK-LK,LK: 3-3
JK@: 4-6
JK2: 7-7

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