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I am making a Stock Market Predictor machine learning application that will try to predict the price for a certain stock. It will take news articles/tweets regarding that particular company and the company's historical data for this reason.

My issue is that I need to first construct a sentiment analyser for the headlines/tweets for that company. I dont want to train a model to give me the sentiment scores rather, I want a sentiment lexicon that contains a bag of words related to stock market and finance.

Is there any such lexicons/dictionaries available that I can use in my project?

Thanks

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Not readily available, but trivial to build on your own. Simply download a sentiment annotated twitter dataset, construct a dictionary of words for it, iterate over the entries and add +1/(-1) to positive(/negative) words. Finally, divide each word's values by its respective occurrence count and you'll have a naive sentiment score for each word, with values close to 1(/-1) indicating strong sentiment charge, which you can use for your BoW task.

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    Constructing a dictionary of pos/neg words does'nt seem so trivial. I need to be particular about the kinds of words that I consider which are related to finance and there are so many words that I can categorize. – Talal Zahid Mar 19 '18 at 11:29
  • All the more likely you'll be unable to find something ready already tailored to your needs. Perhaps a post-processing on the above flow that filters out words that don't fit your needs? – KonstantinosKokos Mar 19 '18 at 11:35
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The people working at the Software Repository for Accounting and Finance at the University of Notre Dame have developed a financial-based lexicon which could be quite relevant for your purposes. I'm not quite sure how the lexicon was developed, however I believe it may have been generated through machine-learning on financial documents (i.e. 10-K's), or annotated qualitatively by staff.

The lexicon contains 354 positive-defined words, with 2355 negative-defined words. Unfortunately, words do not come with a spectrum-based score of sentiment, they are only identified by the year they were input into the lexicon. You can simply set a blanket score for all words, or if you have the time rate word-sentiment personally (make sure to publish your work if you do!). The lexicon also contains a number of categories excluding positive and negative, including uncertainty, Litigious, and Interesting.

I've tested the lexicon myself on individual-sentence news-excerpts, and it performed very well (I used vader as a base lexicon, then added the financial-lexicon on top).

Find the dictionary here.

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There are some publicly available sentiment lexicons (not domain specific but this is not usually a problem):

  1. English: http://saifmohammad.com/WebPages/NRC-Emotion-Lexicon.htm
  2. French: http://advanse.lirmm.fr/feel.php
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    I'd disagree, domain-dependency is a key challenge in lexicon-based approaches, and tailoring a lexicon to a specific domain can increase the accuracy exponentially. Lets say, for example, you are determining sentiment on a book-review vs a car-review. The use of the word 'unpredictable' is completely opposing in the context of each domain, and can skew results significantly. – Laurie Jul 25 '18 at 13:09
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    Of course, but i believe the above mentioned general lexicons are a good starting point (most terms are not domain specific). – Abdaoui Amine Jul 26 '18 at 14:07

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