6

I need to copy a large number of files to a backup folder but I want to maintain their relative paths. I only need specific files; i.e.

C:\scripts\folder\File.ext1
C:\scripts\folder2\file2.ext2
C:\scripts\file3.ext1

But I only need to copy the ext1 files like so:

C:\backup\folder\File.ext1.bak
C:\backup\file3.ext1.bak

The source paths are of multiple depths. This is what I have to copy the files:

$files = gci -path C:\scripts\ -recurse -include *.ext1 
$files | % { Copy-Item $_ "$($_).bak"; move-item $_ -destination C:\backup\ }

This just dumps all the files into C:\backup\ and does not appear to get any of the paths. Not sure how that part would be done.

6

Something like this could work:

gci -path C:\scripts\ -recurse -include *.ext1 | 
  % { Copy-Item $_.FullName "$($_.FullName).bak"
      move-item $_.FullName -destination ($_.FullName -replace 'C:\\scripts\\','C:\backup\') }

It is not clever, but it's quick & dirty and works without a lot of effort.

  • 1
    Might want to double those backslashes in 'C:\scripts\' in the replace. That's a regex. – mjolinor Feb 8 '11 at 23:20
  • Of course, thx. I'm always forgetting that :) – stej Feb 8 '11 at 23:52
  • This looks like it will do the job. I will give it a shot and let you know if it works. – MrGrant Feb 10 '11 at 4:14
3

get-childitem returns absolute paths, but you can make them relative to the current working directory as follows:

resolve-path -relative

So to copy a filtered set of files from the current directory recursively to a destination directory:

$dest = "c:\dest"
$filter = "*.txt"

get-childitem -recurse -include $filter | `
    where-object { !$_.PSIsContainer } | `
    resolve-path -relative | `
    % { $destFile = join-path $dest $_; new-item -type f $destFile -force | out-null; copy-item $_ $destFile; get-item $destfile; }

new-item is needed to create the parent directories

get-item provides a display of all the new files it created

Of course robocopy does all this, but there will be times when you want to do more special filtering or filename mangling...

  • You can pass the -File flag to get-childitem and thus not have to do where-object { !$_.PSIsContainer } – Polymorphix Mar 22 '17 at 11:32
2

Use robocopy.

robocopy c:\scripts c:\backup *.ext1 /s

Oops. I failed to notice you wanted to add the .bak extension too. I still think it is a good idea to use robocopy to copy the files then:

dir c:\backup -recurse -include *.ext1 | % { ren $_ "$_.bak" }
  • 1
    I could do this with robocopy yes but I wanted to see if there was a way to do it with purely powershell. – MrGrant Feb 10 '11 at 4:15
1

You can try this

Clear-Host
$from = "'C:\scripts\"
$to = "'C:\backup\"
$inc = @('*.ext1', '*.extx')
$files = get-childItem  -path $from -include $inc -Recurse
$files | % {$dest = (Join-Path $to $($_.FullName+".bak").SubString($from.length)); $dum = New-Item -ItemType file $dest -Force; Copy-Item -Path $_ -Destination $dest  -Recurse -Force } 

the new-item is there in order to force path creation.

Jean Paul

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