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Why I'm getting the following error when I try to use an const int std::array? I had to replace "<" for "<\" in the error message to show it correctly:

#include <array>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    array<const int, 4> vals;

    return 0;
}

test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:

test.cpp:7:22: error: use of deleted function ‘std::array::array()’

array<\const int, 4> vals; ^~~~

In file included from test.cpp:1:0: /usr/include/c++/7.3.0/array:94:12: note: ‘std::array<\const int, 4>::array()’ is implicitly deleted because the default definition would be ill-formed: struct array ^~~~~

/usr/include/c++/7.3.0/array:94:12: error: uninitialized const member in ‘struct std::array<\const int, 4>’

/usr/include/c++/7.3.0/array:110:56: note: ‘const int std::array<\const int, 4>::_M_elems [4]’ should be initialized typename _AT_Type::_Type _M_elems; ^~~~~~~~

marked as duplicate by jdehesa, R Sahu c++ Mar 19 '18 at 15:30

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  • I think it's better to format error messages as code. At least, fixed-width font will make the ^~~~ part align better. – user202729 Mar 19 '18 at 15:25
  • Then just initialize it. – user202729 Mar 19 '18 at 15:26
  • Related. – user202729 Mar 19 '18 at 15:27
  • const int make the int unable to change (just at the initialisation). Here, you would not be able to change vals after the initialisation, this array is useless. Either remove const, or initialize it array<const int, 4> vals = {1,2,3,4} – Raph Schim Mar 19 '18 at 15:28
  • 2
    You really ought to avoid using namespace std - it is a bad habit to get into, and can silently change the meaning of your program when you're not expecting it. Get used to using the namespace prefix (std is intentionally very short), or importing just the names you need into the smallest reasonable scope. – Toby Speight Mar 19 '18 at 15:28
5

How are you going to assign array values to const int elements? You should initialize them during declaration.

#include <array>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    array<const int, 4> vals{1, 2, 3, 4};

    return 0;
}

Without any initialization, your sample is similar to invalid const declaration:

const int a;

Since std::array itself can not be updated, I suppose the below code would be clearer for understanding.

#include <array>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    const array<int, 4> vals{1, 2, 3, 4};

    return 0;
}
  • Maybe the array is in write-only memory. – Jive Dadson Mar 19 '18 at 15:39
4

It is due to the fact that a constant object must be initialized when it is defined. However using this declaration

array<const int, 4> vals;

you did not provide an initializer.

Consider the following program

#include <iostream>
#include <array>

int main() 
{
    int x = 42;
    std::array<const int, 4> vals = { { 1, 2, 3, 4 } };

    for ( int x : vals ) std::cout << x << ' ';
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Its output is

1 2 3 4
  • 1
    What is the purpose of extra braces? – Killzone Kid Mar 19 '18 at 15:31
  • 1
    Why double { { } } to initialize the array? – FrankS101 Mar 19 '18 at 15:31
  • @KillzoneKid Because early some compilers did not allow to initialize an aggregate such a way without extra braces. – Vlad from Moscow Mar 19 '18 at 15:32
  • @VladfromMoscow Earlier like before C++11? std::array exists since C++11 so I think it is safe to assume single braces would work just fine everywhere with this code. – Killzone Kid Mar 19 '18 at 15:36
  • 1
    @KillzoneKid Early means when C++11 was adopted or before its final adoptation. – Vlad from Moscow Mar 19 '18 at 15:37

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