17

In Postgres 9.5:

select to_char(111, 'FM9,999'); -- gives 111
select to_char(1111, 'FM9,999'); -- gives 1,111
select to_char(11111, 'FM9,999'); -- gives #,### !!!

How can I format my numbers with commas without advance knowledge/assumption of maximum number of possible digits preferably by using built-in stuff like above?

1

3 Answers 3

23

Add another digit or the maximum possible value:

select to_char(11111, 'FM9,999,999');
4
  • 4
    i need a solution without advance knowledge/assumption of maximum number of possible digits
    – mehmet
    Mar 19, 2018 at 19:12
  • 6
    This will work fine, just make your format big enough for largest possible value that can be stored in DB. Max int value is 2 billion, so "FM9,999,999,999" will display them all.
    – Hitobat
    Mar 20, 2018 at 8:14
  • 3
    Well if you use sum(some_column) then you can get over that 2 billion limit quite easily.
    – Nux
    Oct 25, 2019 at 14:03
  • i guess the solution is always use the largest possible value "FM9,999,999,999"
    – CJ Chang
    Nov 5, 2021 at 13:38
2

Another work around is to convert to money, then to varchar and replace the $ symbol

Select replace(round(sum(quantity), 2)::money::varchar, '$', '') as Total from...
0

Similar to @rudy_dark_1's answer, I'm using

SELECT
  rtrim(ltrim(
    -------------------------
    -- Value / Calculation here
    11111.15
    -------------------------
  ::money::varchar, '$'), '.00') AS column_name_here
;

I include AS column_name_here, because replace/ltrim/rtrim, will change the outputted "column name".

^I particularly like this, because I'm using non-decimal values(typically getting info on row query counts for instance).

rtrim and ltrim are a slight "enhancement", because there's one less argument that has to go to them.

If you are working with a decimal/float, it becomes even simpler (no rtrim):

SELECT
  ltrim(
    -------------------------
    -- Value / Calculation here
    11111.15
    -------------------------
  ::money::varchar, '$') AS column_name_here
;

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