5

I have several character vectors of genes containing names of the species in which they're found, and I made an UpSetR plot to show the number of species in common across genes. Now I'd like to do the opposite: Plotting the number of genes in common across species, yet I don't know how to do it.

Example of what I have:

gene1 <- c("Panda", "Dog", "Chicken")
gene2 <- c("Human", "Panda", "Dog")
gene3 <- c("Human", "Panda", "Chicken")  
...#About 20+ genes with 100+ species each

Example of what I would like to have as a result:

Panda <- c("gene1", "gene2", "gene3")
Dog <- c("gene1", "gene2")
Human <- c("gene2", "gene3")
Chicken <- c("gene1", "gene3")
...  

I know it is conceptually easy, yet logistically more complicated. Can anyone give me a clue?

Thank you!

5 Answers 5

8

You can use unstack from base R:

unstack(stack(mget(ls(pattern="gene"))),ind~values)
$Chicken
[1] "gene1" "gene3"

$Dog
[1] "gene1" "gene2"

$Human
[1] "gene2" "gene3"

$Panda
[1] "gene1" "gene2" "gene3"

You can end up listing this to the environment by list2env function

Breakdown:

 l = mget(ls(pattern="gene"))#get all the genes in a list
 m = unstack(stack(l),ind~values)# Stack them, then unstack with the required formula
 m
$Chicken
[1] "gene1" "gene3"

$Dog
[1] "gene1" "gene2"

$Human
[1] "gene2" "gene3"

$Panda
[1] "gene1" "gene2" "gene3"

 list2env(m,.GlobalEnv)
 Dog
 [1] "gene1" "gene2"
0
3

First of all I think for most purposes it's better to store gene vectors in a list, as in

genes <- list(gene1 = gene1, gene2 = gene2, gene3 = gene3)

Then one base R approach would be

genes.v <- unlist(genes)
names(genes.v) <- rep(names(genes), times = lengths(genes))
species <- lapply(unique(genes.v), function(g) names(genes.v)[g == genes.v])
names(species) <- unique(genes.v)
species
# $Panda
# [1] "gene1" "gene2" "gene3"
#
# $Dog
# [1] "gene1" "gene2"
#
# $Chicken
# [1] "gene1" "gene3"
#
# $Human
# [1] "gene2" "gene3"

genes.v is a named vector of all the species with the genes being their names. However, when to species have the same, e.g., gene1, then those names are gene11 and gene12. That's what I fix in the second line. Then in the third line I go over all the species and create the resulting list, except that in the fourth line I add species names.

3

Put the data in a list, to begin with. That makes it easier to work with.

genes <- list(
    gene1 = c("Panda", "Dog", "Chicken"),
    gene2 = c("Human", "Panda", "Dog"),
    gene3 = c("Human", "Panda", "Chicken")
)

Then we can get the species names from there.

species <- unique(unlist(genes))

With this data

> species
[1] "Panda"   "Dog"     "Chicken" "Human" 

For each of these, we want to check if the name is contained in a gene. That is a job for Map (or its cousin lapply, but I like Map):

get_genes_for_species <- function(s) {
    contained <- unlist(Map(function(gene) s %in% gene, genes))
    names(genes)[contained]
}
genes_per_species <- Map(get_genes_for_species, species)

Now you have a list of lists, one list per species, containing the genes found in that species.

> genes_per_species
$Panda
[1] "gene1" "gene2" "gene3"

$Dog
[1] "gene1" "gene2"

$Chicken
[1] "gene1" "gene3"

$Human
[1] "gene2" "gene3"
1

You can try this.

gene  <-unique(c(gene1,gene2,gene3))
TF    <-data.frame(Species = gene)

TF$gene1 <- gene%in%gene1
TF$gene2 <- gene%in%gene2
TF$gene3 <- gene%in%gene3

> TF
  Species gene1 gene2 gene3
1   Panda  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
2     Dog  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
3 Chicken  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
4   Human FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
4
  • That seems useful too! I was thinking now in creating a 1-and-0 matrix (species in rows, genes in cols, just like yours) from a list containing my vectors, do you know how to do it? Thanks! Mar 19, 2018 at 19:57
  • 1
    @GuillermoReales table(reshape2::melt(l)), where l is your list.
    – Henrik
    Mar 19, 2018 at 20:10
  • @Henrik I managed to do it eventually using mtabulate function from qdapTools package. In case it'd be useful from someone, it does the trick too. Mar 19, 2018 at 20:20
  • And from d <- reshape2::melt(l) you could easily create the 'transposed' list: split(d$L1, d$value).
    – Henrik
    Mar 19, 2018 at 20:26
1

Here's a variation that embraces the tidyverse and puts the result in a neat dataframe.

The trick is to concatenate results with str_c and summarise.

   tibble(gene1 = gene1, 
          gene2 = gene2, 
          gene3 = gene3) %>% 
   gather(gene_name, gene_type) %>% 
   group_by(gene_type) %>% 
   summarise(genes = str_c(gene_name, collapse = ", "))

# A tibble: 4 x 2
  gene_type genes              
  <chr>     <chr>              
1 Chicken   gene1, gene3       
2 Dog       gene1, gene2       
3 Human     gene2, gene3       
4 Panda     gene1, gene2, gene3

I agree with Julius (above) that best way to store gene vectors is with a list. A named list would be even better, as:

my_gene_list <- set_names(list(gene1, gene2, gene3), str_c("gene", 1:3) ) 

This would neatly produce the same result...

 my_gene_list %>% as_tibble() %>% 
   gather(gene_name, gene_type) %>% 
   group_by(gene_type) %>% 
   summarise(genes = str_c(gene_name, collapse = ", "))

# A tibble: 4 x 2
  gene_type genes              
  <chr>     <chr>              
1 Chicken   gene1, gene3       
2 Dog       gene1, gene2       
3 Human     gene2, gene3       
4 Panda     gene1, gene2, gene3

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.