1

I'm trying ES6 template literals for multiline strings. The following one works well:

var customer = { name: "Foo" }
var card = { amount: 7, product: "Bar", unitprice: 42 }
var message = `Hello ${customer.name},
want to buy ${card.amount} ${card.product} for
a total of ${card.amount * card.unitprice} bucks?`

Then I tried to apply it to a URL string as follows:

let topic = "pizza";
let url = `https://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php?action=parse&section=0&prop=text&format=json&page=${topic}`;

The single line version works well. But when I changed it to multiline, it didn't work:

let topic = "pizza";
let url = `https://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php
?action=parse&section=0&prop=text&format=json&page=${topic}`;

or  
let url = `https://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php\
?action=parse&section=0&prop=text&format=json&page=${topic}`;

I used this URL to retrieve data:

let https = require("https");
https.get(url, res => {...});

Can anyone tell me what's wrong with the multiline URL? How can I do correctly? Thanks a lot.

  • 6
    it didn't work ... what didn't work? did you get an error? or is it the .get that fails? The issue may be, that by using template literals, the line break (\n or \r\n) will be part of the resulting string - that's not good for an URL – Jaromanda X Mar 19 '18 at 22:19
  • Well at least URL-encode it ... encodeURIComponent (Probably more a problem of neglecting that, than ES6 functionality to begin with.) – CBroe Mar 19 '18 at 22:23
  • I don't think you want to encodeURIComponent on the url var itself - rather, just ${encodeURIComponent(topic)} – Jaromanda X Mar 19 '18 at 22:29
  • Of course, anything else would not make sense. – CBroe Mar 19 '18 at 22:32
  • Why not just removing that carriage return? – Ele Mar 19 '18 at 22:32
1

You have newline characters in your url. Template literal syntax allow you to add newline characters to your string if you have newline chars in side of ``, so your URL has newline characters in it.

console.log('\n' === `
`) // true

Either do a String.prototype.replace() on the url before making the HTTP call

let topic = "pizza";
let url = `https://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php
?action=parse&section=0&prop=text&format=json&page=${topic}`;

\\ removes newline characters from template string
url.replace('\n', ''); 

\\ do your stuff here
let https = require("https");
https.get(url, res => {...});

Or escape the newline characters in the template string

let topic = "pizza";
\\ escape the newline character
let url = `https://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php\
?action=parse&section=0&prop=text&format=json&page=${topic}`;

\\ do your stuff here
let https = require("https");
https.get(url, res => {...});
0

String literals retain the exact structure you write your lines in. So writing on a new line effectively adds a \n to your string.

let url = `https://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php\
?action=parse&section=0&prop=text&format=json&page=${topic}`;

As a string actually looks like this:

let url = `https://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php\\n?action=parse&section=0&prop=text&format=json&page=${topic}`;

That extra \n creates a an incorrect request to the server.

let str = `I
am
a
string
literal`
console.log(str.split('\n'))

edit: You can add an escape \ to the end of each line to remove the \n. Thank you for the correction.

let str = `I\
am\
a\
string\
literal`
console.log(str.split('\n'))

  • 1
    The second multi-line example from the question in which the newline is escaped with \ should be equivalent with writing it on a single line, shouldn't it? – tudorpavel Mar 19 '18 at 22:49
  • 1
    The backslash at the end of the second multi-line example is indeed an escape character. – lonesomeday Mar 19 '18 at 22:53
  • @tudorpavel Adjusted. Thank you – Andrew Mar 19 '18 at 22:55
  • Don't mention it, but OP should explain why the second multi-line example still didn't work with https.get(url). – tudorpavel Mar 19 '18 at 22:59

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