89

When I run PowerShell's Get-ChildItem on a directory (or any cmdlet that returns file system items), it shows a column called Mode, like this:

    Directory: C:\MyDirectory


Mode                LastWriteTime     Length Name
----                -------------     ------ ----
d----          2/8/2011  10:55 AM            Directory1
d----          2/8/2011  10:54 AM            Directory2
d----          2/8/2011  10:54 AM            Directory3
-ar--          2/8/2011  10:54 AM        454 File1.txt
-ar--          2/8/2011  10:54 AM       4342 File2.txt

I searched and searched Google and my local PowerShell book, but I could not find any documentation on the meaning of the Mode column.

What are the possible values of the Mode column and what does each one mean?

3 Answers 3

98

Note that the mode you see is just a string representation of a bitfield enum that hides in the Attributes property. You can figure out what the individual letters mean by simply showing both side by side:

PS> gci|select mode,attributes -u

Mode                Attributes
----                ----------
d-----               Directory
d-r---     ReadOnly, Directory
d----l Directory, ReparsePoint
-a----                 Archive

In any case, the full list is:

d - Directory
a - Archive
r - Read-only
h - Hidden
s - System
l - Reparse point, symlink, etc.
5
  • 1
    Get-ChildItem in my user directory revealed a whole lot of items I can't see in File Explorer despite having "Hidden items" turned on. It seems the difference between them and hidden items I can see like AppData is that they have that system attribute. Is there any way I can see these in File Explorer? Commented Oct 9, 2017 at 19:25
  • 2
    where is "x" for executable?
    – Motorhead
    Commented Jan 7, 2019 at 2:38
  • 5
    @S.N.: This answer predates PowerShell on Linux and Windows has no file system attribute for a file being executable.
    – Joey
    Commented Jan 7, 2019 at 9:41
  • Note that in the question, Mode is a 5-character string. That corresponds to what I am seeing on Server 2012 R2 with PowerShell 4.0. In this answer, Mode a 6-character string, which I can see in Windows 10 and PowerShell 5.1. Probably the "l" attribute was added. Don't get bit like I was by checking for Mode = "d-----". That will not identify directories on older versions.
    – Mark Berry
    Commented May 13, 2021 at 0:30
  • 5
    This isn't the full list. The real one is much longer: [Enum]::GetValues("System.IO.FileAttributes")
    – phuclv
    Commented Dec 19, 2021 at 5:12
16

These are all the file attribute names and there meanings can be found here:

PS C:\> [enum]::GetNames("system.io.fileattributes")
ReadOnly
Hidden
System
Directory
Archive
Device
Normal
Temporary
SparseFile
ReparsePoint
Compressed
Offline
NotContentIndexed
Encrypted
1
  • 2
    While I appreciate the code & the link, this doesn't explain the abbreviations seen in the 'Mode' column which is the topic at hand in the original question. So if you have another resource that shows 'which abbreviation goes to which attribute' that would be an immensely useful edit
    – gregg
    Commented Feb 14, 2022 at 21:01
14

IMHO, the most explanatory is the code itself:

if (instance == null)
{
    return string.Empty;
}
FileSystemInfo baseObject = (FileSystemInfo) instance.BaseObject;
if (baseObject == null)
{
    return string.Empty;
}
string str = "";
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.Directory) == FileAttributes.Directory)
{
    str = str + "d";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.Archive) == FileAttributes.Archive)
{
    str = str + "a";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.ReadOnly) == FileAttributes.ReadOnly)
{
    str = str + "r";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.Hidden) == FileAttributes.Hidden)
{
    str = str + "h";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.System) == FileAttributes.System)
{
    return (str + "s");
}
return (str + "-");
2
  • 1
    @splattered: Reflector from the PowerShell assemblies, I guess.
    – Joey
    Commented Feb 9, 2011 at 0:14
  • 7
    As a side note: the full list of Attributes is way bigger than the five flags shows in the mode column, and they're property filled out on the objects. Try this: [Enum]::GetValues("System.IO.FileAttributes") ...
    – Jaykul
    Commented Feb 9, 2011 at 3:04

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