55

When I run PowerShell's Get-ChildItem on a directory (or any cmdlet that returns file system items), it shows a column called Mode, like this:

    Directory: C:\MyDirectory


Mode                LastWriteTime     Length Name
----                -------------     ------ ----
d----          2/8/2011  10:55 AM            Directory1
d----          2/8/2011  10:54 AM            Directory2
d----          2/8/2011  10:54 AM            Directory3
-ar--          2/8/2011  10:54 AM        454 File1.txt
-ar--          2/8/2011  10:54 AM       4342 File2.txt

I searched and searched Google and my local PowerShell book, but I could not find any documentation on the meaning of the Mode column.

What are the possible values of the Mode column and what does each one mean?

60

Note that the mode you see is just a string representation of a bitfield enum that hides in the Attributes property. You can figure out what the individual letters mean by simply showing both side by side:

PS> gci|select mode,attributes -u

Mode                Attributes
----                ----------
d-----               Directory
d-r---     ReadOnly, Directory
d----l Directory, ReparsePoint
-a----                 Archive

In any case, the full list is:

d - Directory
a - Archive
r - Read-only
h - Hidden
s - System
l - Reparse point, symlink, etc.
  • 3
    PowerShell v5 have sixth spot l for link (ReparsePoint). – user4003407 Sep 27 '15 at 4:28
  • @PetSerAl: Oh, nice. Took them long enough (the attribute value was there before; I think the string with the dashes was constructed just for display from the types XML file. – Joey Sep 28 '15 at 6:39
  • Get-ChildItem in my user directory revealed a whole lot of items I can't see in File Explorer despite having "Hidden items" turned on. It seems the difference between them and hidden items I can see like AppData is that they have that system attribute. Is there any way I can see these in File Explorer? – Kyle Delaney Oct 9 '17 at 19:25
  • where is "x" for executable? – S.N. Jan 7 '19 at 2:38
  • 1
    @S.N.: This answer predates PowerShell on Linux and Windows has no file system attribute for a file being executable. – Joey Jan 7 '19 at 9:41
9

IMHO, the most explanatory is the code itself:

if (instance == null)
{
    return string.Empty;
}
FileSystemInfo baseObject = (FileSystemInfo) instance.BaseObject;
if (baseObject == null)
{
    return string.Empty;
}
string str = "";
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.Directory) == FileAttributes.Directory)
{
    str = str + "d";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.Archive) == FileAttributes.Archive)
{
    str = str + "a";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.ReadOnly) == FileAttributes.ReadOnly)
{
    str = str + "r";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.Hidden) == FileAttributes.Hidden)
{
    str = str + "h";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.System) == FileAttributes.System)
{
    return (str + "s");
}
return (str + "-");
  • 1
    @splattered: Reflector from the PowerShell assemblies, I guess. – Joey Feb 9 '11 at 0:14
  • 2
    As a side note: the full list of Attributes is way bigger than the five flags shows in the mode column, and they're property filled out on the objects. Try this: [Enum]::GetValues("System.IO.FileAttributes") ... – Jaykul Feb 9 '11 at 3:04
4

These are all the file attribute names and there meanings can be found here:

PS C:\> [enum]::GetNames("system.io.fileattributes")
ReadOnly
Hidden
System
Directory
Archive
Device
Normal
Temporary
SparseFile
ReparsePoint
Compressed
Offline
NotContentIndexed
Encrypted
0

Calling these "attributes" is a Windows-specific name and breaks from *nix tradition of calling this "mode". I.e. man chmod for "change mode".

It looks like Windows API design is bending (or acquiescing) toward the more popular term in the wider industry: "Mode".

+1 from me.

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