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I am just learning the Big O notation and wanted to ask how it works for nested loops.

Is it true that in the case of

for (int i = 0; i < N; i++){
    for (int j = 0; j < N; j++){
       do something;
    }
}

It would be O(N squared), while

for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++){
    for (int j = 0; j < N; j++){
        do something;
    }
}

It would be O(N) because the first loop has a constant? Or would it still be O(N squared)? Thank you

  • If doSomething is O(1), your first answer is correct. – cpp beginner Mar 21 '18 at 18:10
  • Welcome to StackOverflow. Please read and follow the posting guidelines in the help documentation, as suggested when you created this account. On topic and how to ask apply here. Research before you post. – Prune Mar 21 '18 at 18:14
  • Knowing this might help you with an answer on a test, but the reason you're learning it is so that you understand about the performance of algorithms. instead of "do something" try putting print("Number of loops = " + (i*j)); and running that. You'll see how your iterations grow as N grows. – Mark D Mar 21 '18 at 18:16
4

Your first statement is correct. N can be very large and O(n) takes it into account.

so first code is O(N^2) while second is O(1000*N) => still O(N)

BIG O notation does not include constants

  • so would the "do something" bit ever affect the Big O? I realised that the we drop the constant in 1000N, hence the O(N). My "do something" is "if (j == a (which is args[0] int) && b[i] == a) then increase counter by 1. In which case would the "do something" change the Big O? Thanks for the answer btw. I will check as answered later – A.Bg Mar 21 '18 at 18:30
  • 2
    Your "doSomething" runs also in O(1), so the overall complexity remains O(N) in this example. – m.raynal Mar 21 '18 at 21:19

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