213

Possible Duplicates:
Statistics: combinations in Python
counting combinations and permutations efficiently
Project euler problem in python (problem 53)

I'm looking to see if built in with the math library in python is the nCr (n Choose r) function:

enter image description here

I understand that this can be programmed but I thought that I'd check to see if it's already built in before I do.

| |
233

The following program calculates nCr in an efficient manner (compared to calculating factorials etc.)

import operator as op
from functools import reduce

def ncr(n, r):
    r = min(r, n-r)
    numer = reduce(op.mul, range(n, n-r, -1), 1)
    denom = reduce(op.mul, range(1, r+1), 1)
    return numer // denom  # or / in Python 2

As of Python 3.8, binomial coefficients are available in the standard library as math.comb:

>>> from math import comb
>>> comb(10,3)
120
| |
  • 2
    Why comprehension not just xrange? – gorlum0 Feb 9 '11 at 7:50
  • 4
    The denominator can be computed using factorial, which is comparable in Python 2 (slightly slower as r increases?) and much faster in Python 3. – leewz Feb 1 '14 at 20:47
  • 1
    @Netzsooc: op.mul is approximately 25% faster in my quick timing test I did on my computer. YMMV. – Jake Griffin May 8 '17 at 6:26
  • 3
    seriously? There is no standard library that does this, like numpy etc? – Charlie Parker Sep 5 '17 at 19:25
  • 3
    If you want to handle impossible scenario's (r< 0 or r > n), then and: if r < 0: return 0 after reseting r to the min. – combinatorist Oct 5 '17 at 14:45
197

Do you want iteration? itertools.combinations. Common usage:

>>> import itertools
>>> itertools.combinations('abcd',2)
<itertools.combinations object at 0x01348F30>
>>> list(itertools.combinations('abcd',2))
[('a', 'b'), ('a', 'c'), ('a', 'd'), ('b', 'c'), ('b', 'd'), ('c', 'd')]
>>> [''.join(x) for x in itertools.combinations('abcd',2)]
['ab', 'ac', 'ad', 'bc', 'bd', 'cd']

If you just need to compute the formula, use math.factorial:

import math

def nCr(n,r):
    f = math.factorial
    return f(n) / f(r) / f(n-r)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print nCr(4,2)

In Python 3, use the integer division // instead of / to avoid overflows:

return f(n) // f(r) // f(n-r)

Output

6
| |
  • 7
    Yeah, but that would be much slower. – Mikel Feb 9 '11 at 6:14
  • 21
    See stackoverflow.com/questions/3025162/… for better answers, e.g. scipy.comb or gmpy.comb. – Mikel Feb 9 '11 at 6:16
  • 4
    For some definition of "slow". If computing poker odds it is perfectly acceptable. The OP didn't specify. – Mark Tolonen Feb 9 '11 at 6:28
  • 7
    @Renato: what are you talking about? This answer isn't dangerous at all. Do you think that math.factorial returns a float, and not an arbitrary-precision integer, maybe? – DSM Mar 25 '13 at 19:03
  • 2
    On my system it takes 10ms to compute 10000 C 500 and returns an answer of 861 digits. Accurate and not particularly "slow" :^) – Mark Tolonen Mar 26 '13 at 0:51

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.