I've wrote a program that creates 4 threads which each sort 20.000 numbers from low to high 50 times. I've runned this test several times on .NET Core 2.0 and .NET Framework 4.6.1. In this test .NET Framework always outperforms .NET Core.

Setup

  • .NET Core in release mode & published
  • Windows 10, i7 duo core, 4 threads (hyperthreading)

The following code has been used to benchmark the two frameworks.

static void Main()
    {
        const int amountParallel = 4;
        var globalStopwatch = new Stopwatch();

        globalStopwatch.Start();

        var tasks = new Task<double[]>[4];

        for (int i = 0; i < amountParallel; i++)
        {
            tasks[i] = Start();
        }

        Task.WaitAll(tasks);

        globalStopwatch.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine("Averages: {0}ms", tasks.SelectMany(r => r.Result).Average(x => x));
        Console.WriteLine("Time completed: {0}", globalStopwatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
    }

    private static Task<double[]> Start()
    {
        return Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            var numbersToSort = new int[20000];

            var globalStopwatch = new Stopwatch();
            var individualStopwatch = new Stopwatch();
            var stopwatchTimes = new double[50];
            int temp;

            globalStopwatch.Start();

            for (int i = 0; 50 > i; i++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Running task: {0}", i);
                numbersToSort = Enumerable.Range(0, 20000).Reverse().ToArray();
                individualStopwatch.Start();

                for (int indexNumberArray = 0; numbersToSort.Length > indexNumberArray; indexNumberArray++)
                {
                    for (int sort = 0; numbersToSort.Length - 1 > sort; sort++)
                    {
                        if (numbersToSort[sort] > numbersToSort[sort + 1])
                        {
                            temp = numbersToSort[sort + 1];
                            numbersToSort[sort + 1] = numbersToSort[sort];
                            numbersToSort[sort] = temp;
                        }
                    }
                }

                individualStopwatch.Stop();

                Console.WriteLine("Task {0} completed, took: {1}ms", i, Math.Round(individualStopwatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds));

                stopwatchTimes[i] = individualStopwatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds;

                individualStopwatch.Reset();
            }

            globalStopwatch.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine("Total time: {0}s", Math.Round(globalStopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds, 2));
            Console.WriteLine("Average: {0}ms", Math.Round(stopwatchTimes.Average(time => time)));

            return stopwatchTimes;
        }, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
    }

Test results:

.NET Core

  • Average: 761ms
  • Total time: 38s

.NET Framework

  • Average: 638ms
  • Total time: 32s

.NET Core isn't slower on only CPU related tasks. It's also slower on disk I/O tasks.

Any idea's why .NET Core is a bit slower on this part? Are these improvements I could do to improve the performance of .NET Core?

  • Maybe .NET Framework leans directly on Win32 to manage threading, whereas .NET Core needs an additional layer of interoperability to work with Windows, Linux and Mac. I can't say for sure but if I were to hazard a guess, it would be that. – series0ne Mar 22 at 9:57
  • 1
    @series0ne I guess so. According to andrewlock.net/… .NET Core seems to have an extra layer called the Runtime Adaptation Layer. This probably causes the overhead. – Jamie Mar 22 at 10:12
  • 3
    Comparing apples and oranges is an easy mistake. A .NETFramework project by default runs 32-bit code, .NETCore likes 64-bit code. Very different fruits on floating point-heavy code. Untick the "Prefer 32-bit" checkbox and try again. – Hans Passant Mar 22 at 10:39
  • 2
    Score another one for psychic debugging. Feel free to use the guess to complete this Q+A. – Hans Passant Mar 22 at 10:56
  • 2
    Another point of note is that the desktop x86 JIT is a separate code base from the x64 JIT. For 64-bit, both .NET Framework and .NET Core use RyuJIT now; for 32-bit .NET Core still uses RyuJIT, but .NET Framework uses the legacy JIT, so you've got both different bitness and a different jitter. – Jeroen Mostert Mar 22 at 12:04
up vote 8 down vote accepted

.NET Framework projects default to 32-bit code. This option is visible in the build settings of a project and selected by default. .NET Core projects default to 64-bit code. If you untick the "Prefer 32-bit" box you will notice .NET Framework drops in performance.

Another point of note is that the desktop x86 JIT is a separate code base from the x64 JIT. For 64-bit, both .NET Framework and .NET Core use RyuJIT now; for 32-bit .NET Core still uses RyuJIT, but .NET Framework uses the legacy JIT, so you've got both different bitness and a different jitter.

The answers were provided in the comments by Hans Passant and Jeroen Mostert.

This should be fixed in .Net Core 2.0.7 and .Net Framework 4.7.2, via https://github.com/dotnet/coreclr/pull/15323

Root cause was a bug in the JIT's Common Subexpression Elimination (aka CSE) optimization. See issue (linked from PR) for gory details.

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