1

I have a rather large model in which we had to shuffle a foreign key relation around. Apart from changing the relations the migration shouldn't do much. However, the behavior we observe is that the generated migration is bogus, in fact, it attempts to drop the primary key of the table. Which obviously fails.

The old situation was the following:

public class InvoiceStatus
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

public class InvoiceSample 
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public int InvoiceStatusId { get; set; }

    public InvoiceStatus InvoiceStatus { get; set; }
}

This has now been changed to:

public class InvoiceStatus
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public int? InvoiceSampleId { get; set; }

    public virtual InvoiceSample InvoiceSample{ get; set; }
}

public class InvoiceSample 
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public int InvoiceStatusId { get; set; }

    public InvoiceStatus InvoiceStatus { get; set; }
}

In addition to changing the entities themselves we added the following snippet to the ModelBuilder:

        modelBuilder.Entity<InvoiceStatus>()
                            .HasOptional(st => st.InvoiceSample)
                            .WithRequired(smp => smp.InvoiceStatus);

The migration generated for this change contains the following lines:

    public override void Up()
    {
        DropForeignKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "InvoiceStatusId", "dbo.InvoiceStatus");
        DropIndex("dbo.InvoiceSamples", new[] { "InvoiceStatusId" });
        DropColumn("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id");
        RenameColumn(table: "dbo.InvoiceSamples", name: "InvoiceStatusId", newName: "Id");
        DropPrimaryKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples");
        AddColumn("dbo.InvoiceStatus", "InvoiceSampleId", c => c.Int());
        AlterColumn("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id", c => c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true));
        AddPrimaryKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id");
        CreateIndex("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id");
        CreateIndex("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "InvoiceStatusId", unique: true);
        AddForeignKey("dbo.InvoiceStatus", "SetId", "dbo.InvoiceSets", "Id", cascadeDelete: true);
        AddForeignKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id", "dbo.InvoiceStatus", "Id");;
    }

Obviously this migration is not going to fly, as EF attempts to drop the primary key while it is still the primary key.

Additionally a migration I attempted to generate after the above migration also failed when executing. This second migration was to drop a foreign key relation between two entities. Manually executing the generated SQL statements one-by-one on the database worked while the automatic migration failed with an SQL Exception.

Is there any reason why EF in this case has such a considerable effort generating and executing valid migrations? Or is there something I am missing here?

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  • Could you add InvoiceSample model configuration also?
    – arekzyla
    Mar 22, 2018 at 12:45
  • I'm sorry but which configuration do you mean? Because AFAIK there is not additional configuration. At least there is no further configuration for InvoiceSample in the ModelBuilder. Mar 22, 2018 at 12:49

1 Answer 1

1

I'm going to make some assumptions here (it would help to see the current columns in your tables to confirm that I am making the right assumptions).

One-to-one relationships have a principal entity and a dependent entity. In the physical tables the dependent table includes a column that is a FK to the principal table. A register in the principal table is created first, it can exist without a related register in the dependent table. So in your updated model InvoiceStatus is the principal entity, and InvoiceSample is the dependent entity.

EF6 implements one-to-one relationships like this: the principal table has a PK, the dependent table has a PK that is also the column for a FK to the principal table. So the values in both PK fields are the same.

So EF expects your tables to be something like this:

InvoiceStatus: 
Column Id (PK)

InvoiceSamples:
Column Id (PK, FK to InvoiceStatus.Id)

But looking at the previous version of your entities you probably currently have something like this (which actually implements a one-to-many relationship, but you probably only have at most one existing record in InvoiceSamples for each record in InvoiceStatus, so it looks like a one-to-one):

InvoiceStatus: 
Column Id (PK)

InvoiceSamples:
Column Id (PK)
Column InvoiceStatusId (FK to InvoiceStatus.Id)

So the migration is trying to convert your existing tables to the schema shown in the first code above. The problem is that you already have existing records there, and the values in InvoiceSamples.Id do not match with the values of InvoiceSamples.InvoiceStatusId.

How to fix this? Unless your InvoiceSamples has other FKs and InvoiceSamples.Id is used anywhere else, I would let EF remove the existing Id column and apply the changes contained in your automatically generated migration. If you get errors as you say because the migration tries to drop the PK column before dropping the PK constraint, then try moving the DropPrimaryKey line before the DropColumn line. You can manually modify an automatically created migration if you need to.

Anyway before tuning that migration you should check that you really do not have more that one record in InvoiceSample for each record in InvoiceStatus. In that case you just can't convert the relationship to one-to-one unless you do some data fixing first.

You can use a query similar to this one:

select InvoiceStatus.Id, count(InvoiceSamples.Id) 
from InvoiceStatus
inner join InvoiceSamples
on InvoiceStatus.Id = InvoiceSamples.InvoiceStatusId
group by InvoiceStatus.Id
having count(InvoiceSamples.Id) > 1

Update: Try this migration methods:

public override void Up()
{
    DropForeignKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "InvoiceStatusId", "dbo.InvoiceStatus");
    DropIndex("dbo.InvoiceSamples", new[] { "InvoiceStatusId" });
    DropPrimaryKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples");   //Moved up
    RenameColumn(table: "dbo.InvoiceSamples", name: "Id", newName: "OldId");    //Instead of DropColumn
    RenameColumn(table: "dbo.InvoiceSamples", name: "InvoiceStatusId", newName: "Id");  //This will be the new PK
    AlterColumn("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id", c => c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true));
    AddPrimaryKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id");
    CreateIndex("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id");
    AddForeignKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id", "dbo.InvoiceStatus", "Id");
    DropColumn("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "OldId");  //Now we can delete the old PK column
}

public override void Down()
{
    DropForeignKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id", "dbo.InvoiceStatus");
    DropIndex("dbo.InvoiceSamples", new[] { "Id" });
    DropPrimaryKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples");
    RenameColumn(table: "dbo.InvoiceSamples", name: "Id", newName: "InvoiceStatusId");
    AlterColumn("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "InvoiceStatusId", c => c.Int(nullable: false, identity: false));
    AddColumn("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id", c => c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true));
    AlterColumn("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id", c => c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true));
    AddPrimaryKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "Id");
    CreateIndex("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "InvoiceStatusId");
    AddForeignKey("dbo.InvoiceSamples", "InvoiceStatusId", "dbo.InvoiceStatus", "Id", cascadeDelete: true);
}

I tested them on a small test project. I recommend you the same, to avoid the pain of restoring the real, big database after each test of the migration.

You can accomplish this with a few steps (believe me, it looks like a lot of trouble but it's not really that much):

  • Create a Console Application project.
  • Add the EF nuget package.
  • Run Enable-Migrations in Package Manager Console.
  • Add a connection string to the app.config file. Something like this (a new database will be created there):

      <connectionStrings>
        <add name="MyConnectionString" connectionString="Server=(localdb)\ProjectsV13;Database=EFSample;Trusted_Connection=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=True;App=EntityFramework" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
      </connectionStrings>
    
  • Add a simple DbContext that uses this connection string in a hard-coded parameter in the constructor, and uses a MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion database initializer:

    public class TestDbContext : DbContext
    {
        public TestDbContext() : base("MyConnectionString")
        {
            Database.SetInitializer(new MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion<TestDbContext, Migrations.Configuration>());
            Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = true;
        }
    
        public IDbSet<InvoiceStatus> InvoiceStatus { get; set; }
        public IDbSet<InvoiceSample> InvoiceSamples { get; set; }
    
        protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
        }
    }
    
  • Add a simplified version of your two model entities before the changes (just InvoiceStatus and InvoiceSample, keep it minimal). Generate a migration for them with Add-Migration (with name Initial, for example). Apply the migration with Update-Database. The test database will be created.

  • Change your entities with the new properties (including the new relationship configuration in OnModelCreating code), generate another migration (with name Final, for example). Modify that migration with the code I wrote in my update. Run Update-Database. To go back to the previous database version run Update-Database -TargetMigration Initial, or just delete the test database. It will be easily created again.

As a final note, I tested the migration code I pasted above and it worked, but my tables were empty, so the test scenario is ignoring problems related to duplicated data. It just tests that the migration does not have schema errors. You can try adding some data before running the second migration (manually, or using the Seed method in the Configuration class). It would be better if you import there the same Ids that you have in the real table. My guess is that you get errors when creating the FKs and indexes because you have duplicated Ids, as your previous schema didn't enforce the one-to-one integrity. If this is the case then you have to either keep your current one-to-many relationship, or either write some sql script to remove those duplicated values or some other way to fix your data. I strongly recommend you to use the query I wrote above to find out if your data are ready to apply the one-to-one relationship, before implementing the changes. If you find those duplicated Ids don't even try to change the schema until you fix that problem.

4
  • Thanks for the explanation on principal and dependent. I already found some explanation on that online, but this makes sense. Letting EF remove the ID column is fine by me, I know that in no other point in the application the ID of InvoiceSample is used. However, I tried playing with the migration for a while. And what I found is that even with the correct placement of DropPrimaryKey there are still other lines in the migration, around CreateIndex` and AddForeignKey, that then cause an exception. Manually hunting down that the correct order is time-consuming and. Mar 23, 2018 at 14:33
  • cont. not going to work if I have this happens again. Even for this relative small migration restoring the database every time so that I can test another order of SQL statements in the migration is very annoying. So I was actually hoping if there are some pointers on how I can ensure that EF fixes this migration for me. Mar 23, 2018 at 14:33
  • I added an update to my answer with the fixed migration code, and some instructions to test your changes in an easy way that does not require restoring the database. I hope it helps. Anyway, first you should make sure that your data are ready for the one-to-one relationship (I think you might have duplicated values in your InvoiceSamples.InvoiceStatusId column, and that is why you get errors when creating the index or PK on that column, but it is just my guess).
    – Diana
    Mar 23, 2018 at 23:10
  • Thanks for the expansion, I worked with this method yesterday and it made debugging the migration considerably easier. Still annoying but do-able. From what I remember from the error messages it was the migration attempting to reference something that did not exist, and not duplicate value in Invoicesample.InvoiceStatusId. Mar 27, 2018 at 8:00

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