2

I frequently use immutable objects composed of strings and numbers. For example:

const InternalServerError = {
    status: 500,
    message: 'Internal Server Error'
}

I never change the properties, so I would prefer the type of InternalServerError to use number and string literals, like this:

{
    status: 500,
    message: 'Internal Server Error'
}

However, TypeScript automatically widens the types in the inferred type of InternalServerError:

{
    status: number,
    message: string
}

I could cast each property to its literal type, like this:

const InternalServerError = {
    status: 500 as 500,
    message: 'Internal Server Error' as 'Internal Server Error'
}

But this has two problems:

  1. Repetition, especially for long strings
  2. It's possible to cast the value to the wrong literal type (500 as 501 for example) and the compiler will not complain, making this susceptible to typos.

What is the easiest (least boilerplate code or repetition) and most type safe (least possibility for uncaught type errors) way to achieve this?

1 Answer 1

0

You can create an helper function with generics to infer precise types (500 instead of number for example) :

function makeError<
    S extends number,
    M extends string
>(status: S, message: M): {status: S, message: M} {
    return {status, message}
}

const InternalServerError = makeError(500, 'Internal Server Error')
const NotFoundError = makeError(404, 'Not found')

// Code = 500
type Code = (typeof InternalServerError)['status']
// Message = Internal Server Error
type Message = (typeof InternalServerError)['message']

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