I want to refresh my memory on the conditions under which a compiler typically auto generates a default constructor, copy constructor and assignment operator.

I recollect there were some rules, but I don't remember, and also can't find a reputable resource online. Can anyone help?

  • 3
    Don't provide any of them. – DumbCoder Feb 9 '11 at 11:09
up vote 109 down vote accepted

In the following, "auto-generated" means "implicitly declared as defaulted, but not defined as deleted". There are situations where the special member functions are declared, but defined as deleted.

  • The default constructor is auto-generated if there is no user-declared constructor (§12.1/5).
  • The copy constructor is auto-generated if there is no user-declared move constructor or move assignment operator (because there are no move constructors or move assignment operators in C++03, this simplifies to "always" in C++03) (§12.8/8).
  • The copy assignment operator is auto-generated if there is no user-declared move constructor or move assignment operator (§12.8/19).
  • The destructor is auto-generated if there is no user-declared destructor (§12.4/4).

C++11 and later only:

  • The move constructor is auto-generated if there is no user-declared copy constructor, copy assignment operator or destructor, and if the generated move constructor is valid (§12.8/10).
  • The move assignment operator is auto-generated if there is no user-declared copy constructor, copy assignment operator or destructor, and if the generated move assignment operator is valid (e.g. if it wouldn't need to assign constant members) (§12.8/21).
  • 4
    Does an inherited destructor count? I mean, say I've got a base class with an empty virtual destructor. Does it prevent creation of move constructors in subclasses? If the answer is yes, will it help if I define a move constructor in the base class? – kamilk Jul 6 '14 at 13:29
  • 8
    I think that you should mention perhaps that having const members in the class will prevent the constructor from being auto-generated... – nonsensickle Jul 31 '14 at 23:08
  • Does "There are situations where the special member functions are declared, but defined as deleted." refer to where you for example have const or reference members where move will be impossible? No, that can't be, because there copy will be applied. – towi Sep 27 '16 at 7:37
  • I know that it's restricted to send hyperlinks in this forum. But it's also good article - cplusplus.com/articles/y8hv0pDG – bruziuz Oct 12 '16 at 0:54
  • Note, that as of the standard an implicitly defaulted copy constructor "is deprecated if the class has a user-declared copy assignment operator or a user-declared destructor" (12.8 Copying and moving class objects [class.copy]). – sigy Mar 29 '17 at 10:59

I've found the diagram below very useful.

C++ rules for automatic constructors and assignment operators from Sticky Bits - Becoming a Rule of Zero Hero

  • Beautiful. What does "independent" refer to? Independent from what? – towi Sep 27 '16 at 7:29
  • 4
    Copy ctor/assignment are 'independent' from each other. If you write just one, the compiler will provide the other. In contrast, if you provide either a move ctor or a move assignment, the compiler won't supply the other. – Marco M. Oct 3 '16 at 20:14
  • Wonder what's the reason behind copy operations are being independent. Historic reasons may be? or the fact that copy won't modify it's target but move does? – Explorer_N Jul 5 '17 at 7:47
  • @Explorer_N Yes, backward compatibility, so historic reasons. It was a bad design choice long time ago, so now there's a need for good practices like the "rule of three" (define all 3 or none: copy constructor, copy assignment operator, and often destructor) to avoid hard to find bugs. – atablash Mar 31 at 18:41

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