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For a programming exam, I was asked to make an insertion sort algorithm to order numbers the teacher gave us.

I thought I nailed it. It maybe wasn't the shortest algorithm possible, but I did my best, and it sorted as was asked for.

The thing is, my teacher told me that I did a bubble sort instead of an insertion sort, and refuses to check it again. I'm pretty sure it is an insertion sort.

Could you tell me what you think?

We are suppose to show first the unordered array, then the steps and finally the ordered array.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "iostream"

using namespace std;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]) {

    double killme[34] = {7,5,6,5,78,9,63,36,32,5,78,63,2,1,9,45,23,32,21,45,78,32,58,23,36,41,23,45,21,45,6,9,36,7};   

    cout << "Arreglo desordenado: \n";

    for (int i = 0; i < 34; i++) {
        if(i != 33) {
            cout << killme[i] << ", ";
        }
        else {
            cout << killme[i] << ".";
        }
    }

    cout << endl;
    cout << endl;
    cout << "Pasos: " << endl;
    double var;
    int j = 1;
    int k = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < 33; i++) {
        if (killme[i+1] < killme[i]) {
            while (killme[i+1] < killme[i]) {
                var = killme[i];
                killme[i] = killme[i+1];
                killme[i+1] = var;
                i--;
                if (i<0) {
                    break;
                }
            }

            for (int i = 0; i < 34; i++) {
                if (i != 33) {
                    cout << killme[i] << ",";
                }
                else {
                    cout << killme[i] << ".";
                }
            }

            cout << endl;
            cout << endl;
        }

        i = k;
        k++;
    }

    cout << "Arreglo ordenado: \n";

    for (int i = 0; i < 34; i++) {
        if (i != 33) {
            cout << i+1 << "." << killme[i] << ", " << endl;
        }
        else {
            cout << i+1 << "." << killme[i] << "." << endl;
        }
    }

    cout << endl;
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

Output 1

OUTPUT1

Output 2

OUTPUT2

Output 3

OUTPUT3

  • 2
    And why is your array called killme? Is it something in another language? If not, you need to name your variables better so you don't confuse yourself. – BessieTheCow Mar 23 '18 at 2:30
  • What answer do you expect ?, please read How to Ask – eyllanesc Mar 23 '18 at 2:31
  • Sorry about it, I'm new on the site and I'm figuring out how things work. – Alan Mar 23 '18 at 2:32
  • 2
    It's neither, but it performs about as many comparisons as bubble sort because of the redundant comparisons when incrementing i. – Raymond Chen Mar 23 '18 at 2:39
  • 1
    Your means to find a new unsorted element is inefficient compared to insertion sort (you know thr first K elements are already sorted, but you compare again). Your means to insert the new element into the sorted sublist is bubble-like, which is what probably made your instructor dismiss it. Overall you do approx 2x the comparisons of insertion sort and spend 50%+ more time juggling elements compared to what it requires. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Mar 23 '18 at 3:11
1

This is insertion sort. well its very primitive. as you can see it take each element and trys to find its place by comparing between element before and after it using for looping

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