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I am trying to make some rounding for money in Java. I send it to Fiscal printer which has defined some rounding parameters.

There is one number which defines number of decimals ... for example x = 0.0100; Second number is some coefficient for rounding. For example y = 0.0050; All greater than 0.0050 should be rounded to 0.01 and all less than 0.0050 should be rounded to 0.00. BigDecimal is not solution because of this number which defines rounding mode.

In documentation of printer I have some table with examples of rounding numbers...

  • x = 0.0100; y = 0.0001; 15.2241 = 15.23; 15.0009 = 15.01
  • x = 0.0100; y = 0.0010; 15.2241 = 15.23; 15.0009 = 15.00
  • x = 0.0100; y = 0.0100; 15.2241 = 15.23; 15.0009 = 15.00
  • x = 0.0100; y = 0.0040; 15.2241 = 15.23
  • x = 0.0100; y = 0.0041; 15.2241 = 15.23
  • x = 0.0100; y = 0.0042; 15.2241 = 15.22
  • x = 0.1000; y = 0.0100; 15.2241 = 15.30; 0.0010 = 0.00
  • x = 1.0000; y = 0.5000; 15.2241 = 15.00; 0.0010 = 0.00
  • x = 1.0000; y = 0.0010; 15.2241 = 16.00; 0.0010 = 1.00

I was trying to solve this for few hours and I can't find the solution. This is my current code... handling decimal points with number x.

Math.round(value / x) * x;

How should I add there number "y" ... I tried few solutions and I still get bad values for some combinations of variables.

I checked this also, but it didn't work fine ... How to customize the form of rounding

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  • 1
    I see "greater than" and "less than", what is with "exactly equal"? Mar 23 '18 at 17:14
  • This isn't standard rounding, you'll probably have to implement your own algorithm : extract the significant part from the whole number, check whether the rest is above or beyond the rounding threshold (or equal as mentionned by Andrey), then modify the significant part accordingly
    – Aaron
    Mar 23 '18 at 17:20
  • I don't understand the third example (x = 0.0100; y = 0.0100; 15.2241 = 15.23;), shouldn't that round down to 15.22 since 0.0041 < 0.0100? Or is there a special case when x and y are the same? Mar 23 '18 at 17:52
  • @SeanVanGorder I think it is like ... 4 > 0 (numbers at same decimal place) ... so it goes up and you get 15.23 because you have two decimal places.
    – Viktor 36
    Mar 23 '18 at 18:09
  • @Viktor36 But then 15.0009 should round up to 15.01, since 9 > 0. The two results on that line are inconsistent. Are you sure that's the intended output? Mar 23 '18 at 18:15
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This matches all the examples except for x = 0.0100; y = 0.0100, where it returns 15.2241 = 15.22; 15.0009 = 15.00 instead of 15.23. Based on the description, that should be the correct result.

static BigDecimal round(BigDecimal val, BigDecimal x, BigDecimal y) {
    BigDecimal remainder = val.remainder(x);
    BigDecimal base = val.subtract(remainder);
    return remainder.compareTo(y) < 0 ? base : base.add(x);
}

(EDIT: Updated to handle x = 0.0200 example)

This is as close as I can get without an explanation for why the third example is inconsistent. Adding special-case code just for that example might not accurately reflect the rules behind it and could give incorrect results for similar values.

Also note that you should never use floating point (float/double) values when you're dealing with money, inaccuracies can build up quickly. BigDecimal instances should be created directly from a String of the value, and they should be converted back to String using DecimalFormat.

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  • It is not good because of rounding by number x when it is 0.0200 for example. It should round to first 2. Check my code here stackoverflow.com/questions/49455061/…
    – Viktor 36
    Mar 23 '18 at 23:11
  • You said x was the number of decimals, and all the examples used 1, so I went with that. Can you give more examples with other digits for x? Can it be something like 0.0300 or 0.0700? Also, do you have more examples where x and y are equal? Mar 26 '18 at 17:10
  • I updated the code to work with arbitrary x values, so it now matches x = 0.0200; y = 0.0030; 15.2241 = 15.24 and still uses BigDecimal to avoid floating-point inaccuracies. It still doesn't match the third example, since as I said, it's inconsistent; either both should round up or both should round down. Mar 26 '18 at 17:40
  • I wrote email to manufacturer of fiscal printer and he replied that it should be val + y and then just remove decimals by x.. Example 15.2241 + 0.01 (y) = 15.2341 use 0.01 (x) = 15.23 and 15.2241 + 0,005 = 15.2291 use 0.01 = 15,22, It is weird, because its wrong if I look into their manual for programmers. He wrote something like 15.0009 + 0.01 = 15.0109 and if you have x = 0.01 (two decimal places), you remove all but two decimals and you get 15.01. I tried to set some of values on printer and sometimes I got wrong values even without rounding in code. Their manual must be wrong!
    – Viktor 36
    Mar 26 '18 at 20:29
  • @Viktor36 Wow. Does that mean x should always be a 1 digit? And it sounds like y is actually the offset from the ceiling, not the floor. Try experimenting with the printer and make a list of accurate examples, maybe post it as a separate question. Mar 26 '18 at 22:40
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I made function like this ... values seems to be ok, but one is still wrong ... x = 0.0100; y = 0.0100; 15.0009 = 15.01 It should be 15.00

Code that was created by @SeanVanGorder is not very good because if x = 0.0200 ... value is wrong. My function makes x = 0.0200; y = 0.0030; 15.2241 = 15.24 and it should be like this ... rounding to first 2.

Return type is double, because I didn't manage to make good rounding depended to variable x with BigDecimal. I will use return value only for writing to printer, so there shouldn't be problem with floating points etc., but if someone knows solution, feel free to post it. It is probably the best solution I made, but it is still not 100% fine.

UPDATE: I updated to code... now it is working fully with BigDecimal and it is probably best solution for this problem. I wrote an email to manufacturer of printer and I got some reply that was in a conflict with description in manual for programmers. So, this is not 100% fine solution and one value is still wrong value = 15.0009; x = 0.0100; y = 0.0100; should be 15.00 (manual), but manufacturer wrote 15.01 and my code returns 15.01.

static BigDecimal roundVaros(BigDecimal value, BigDecimal x, BigDecimal y) {
    BigDecimal a = value.divide(x, RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
    BigDecimal b = y.divide(x, RoundingMode.HALF_UP);

    a = a.subtract(BigDecimal.valueOf(a.longValue()));
    b = b.subtract(BigDecimal.valueOf(b.longValue()));

    if (a.compareTo(b) >= 0) {
        return value.divide(x, RoundingMode.HALF_UP).setScale(0, RoundingMode.CEILING).multiply(x);
    } else {
        return value.divide(x, RoundingMode.HALF_UP).setScale(0, RoundingMode.FLOOR).multiply(x);
    }
}

Thanks to @SeanVanGoder (his code helped me also)

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Try this add 0.0050 to the number. The logic is that if it is less than 0.50 then will stay less than 1 and when chopped the rest it would automatically go to 0. If bigger will go above 1 so when chopped will stay 1.

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  • I already tried this, but it worked only for some combinations.
    – Viktor 36
    Mar 23 '18 at 17:50

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