38

I was surprised to find that these two programs produce the same output:

Program A

package main
import "fmt"

func main() {  
    defer fmt.Println(1)
    defer fmt.Println(2)
}  //prints 2 1

Program B

package main
import "fmt"

func main() {  
    {
        defer fmt.Println(1)
    }
    defer fmt.Println(2)
}  //prints 2 1

In other words, the "defer" statement appears to disregard lexical closures [edit: Thanks to @twotwotwo for correcting my terminology, I meant to say "block" not "lexical closure"] and is strictly scoped to the function. I wondered:

  1. is my understanding correct?
  2. is there a way to scope it to the block so that it triggers upon exiting the closure, not the function?

I can imagine doing several units of work in sequence, each requiring its own resource to be closed before proceeding... would be nice not to have to break them into separate functions solely for that purpose.

6
  • 4
    A "lexical closure" usually refers to a function, not a block, and bare braces don't create a function in Go. If you actually defined a function -- as func() { defer fmt.Println(1); }() -- the defer would be scoped to it. (Maybe the confusion is because blocks conventionally define "lexical scopes," even though they aren't "lexical closures.")
    – twotwotwo
    Commented Mar 23, 2018 at 19:30
  • 1
    @twotwotwo Thanks for the terminology correction, will update the question
    – Magnus
    Commented Mar 23, 2018 at 19:36
  • 4
    A deferred call is put on the call stack. Functions have call stacks, blocks don't and for this reason, they can only by function scoped. Commented Mar 25, 2018 at 22:11
  • 2
    This question has been closed as "opinion-based", but it isn't.
    – al45tair
    Commented Nov 12, 2021 at 20:30
  • 1
    @GrzegorzŻur Language design and implementation go hand-in-hand. For example, Swift's defer statement runs at the end of the block, not the end of the function. So it's certainly an implementable feature. Commented Nov 12, 2021 at 20:44

2 Answers 2

19
  1. Is my understanding correct?

Yes.

  1. Is there a way to scope it to the block [...]?

There is no way to change how defer works. Depending on the problem you are trying to solve, perhaps splitting your function (first example below) or defining anonymous functions (second example) would help. The latter just for reference and probably best avoided because of how it makes the code less readable.

More info on defer at Go Spec.

Split

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    fmt.Println("main")
    defer fmt.Println("defer from main")
    f()
}

func f() {
    fmt.Println("f")
    defer fmt.Println("defer from f")
}
main
f
defer from f
defer from main

→ playground

Anonymous functions

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    fmt.Println("outer func")
    defer fmt.Println("defer from outer func")
    func() {
        fmt.Println("first inner func")
        defer fmt.Println("defer from first inner func")
    }()
    func() {
        fmt.Println("second inner func")
        defer fmt.Println("defer from second inner func")
    }()
}
outer func
first inner func
defer from first inner func
second inner func
defer from second inner func
defer from outer func

→ playground

2
  • Simiar to my comment on the other answer, I think the anonymous function is probably what the asker wants, but they seem to be confusing "lexical closure" (which conventionally means an anonymous function) with a brace-enclosed block, maybe because those are associated with lexical scopes.
    – twotwotwo
    Commented Mar 23, 2018 at 19:34
  • Thanks, the anonymous function approach seems perfect. As you can prob tell, I'm new to go and tend to look for analogies to my old Java idioms.
    – Magnus
    Commented Mar 23, 2018 at 19:40
10

Correct?

Yes.

Why?

If you can only have one behavior, function vs. block, which one is easier to define the other?

  • Suppose defer works on block. If you want to defer to a wider scope, you can't. Sometimes, Go requires you to enter a new block, like in if statements, which makes it hard to control easily when defer is applied.

  • Now, if defer is scoped by functions, then you can easily add a new function to shrink the scope. You can even have an anonymous function that you call directly.

    func() {
        defer ...
    }()
    
3
  • I thought this was the answer, but realized that the question said "lexical closure" but the example just showed a block. (Maybe the confusion is because "lexical scoping" is usually block scoping, even though blocks aren't lexical closures.) So the answer to "is my understanding correct?" may be "not quite" if the root cause is that asker confused those things.
    – twotwotwo
    Commented Mar 23, 2018 at 19:33
  • 1
    Do you think there is a plausible situation where the behavior of defer in Go is useful? Commented Mar 2, 2022 at 19:30
  • 2
    Also, your statement is false. Building up a function-scoped defer is possible from a block-scoped. Declare a slice of values, append the values to be cleaned up from within the for/if/etc. to the slice and defer iterating over the values. That way, the unbounded allocation happening from using defer in a loop would be explicit. Commented Mar 2, 2022 at 19:36

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